Rabindranath Tagore: A beacon for humanity

Sep 17, 2017 | Views: 3,234

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Rabindranath Tagore (1861 – 1941) was an illustrious man of many talents. A prolific writer, poet, songwriter, playwright, actor, and painter, he revolutionised Indian art and literature, and was also a pioneer of the Bengal Renaissance Movement. Rabindranath’s works have influenced numerous writers, artists, painters, activists, humanitarian workers, social workers, the poor and the rich across the globe, and his works have been translated into Dutch, English, Spanish, German, and many other languages.

Rabindranath was the first non-European to have won a Noble Prize in Literature in 1913, and he was granted a knighthood by King George V in 1919. However, he was unattached to honours and accolades and in 1919, Rabindranath renounced his knighthood in protest of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre, during which a crowd of non-violent protesters and Sikh pilgrims were brutally fired upon by the British Indian Army.

Rabindranath’s principles, ideals, works, and great deeds garnered admiration from many famous personalities of his time. Not only did he command respect from his fellow writers, but he also maintained relationships and correspondence with the likes of eminent scientist and fellow Nobel laureate Albert Einstein. Rabindranath was also a friend of, and the person who gave Gandhi the name ‘Mahatma’.

After his passing in 1941, Rabindranath continued to inspire a younger generation of artists, writers, and many others to value spiritualism and humanity, and to live their lives to their fullest potentials. You can read more about his life and works below.

Tsem Rinpoche

The Grasp of your Hand

Let me not pray to be sheltered from dangers, but to be fearless in facing them.
Let me not beg for the stilling of my pain, but for the heart to conquer it.
Let me not crave in anxious fear to be saved, but hope for the patience to win my freedom.

Grant me that I may not be a coward, feeling your mercy in my success alone; but let me find the grasp of Your hand in my failure.

– Rabindranath Tagore

Early Life and Family Influence (1861 – 1884)

Rabindranath’s parents: Debendranath Tagore (left) and Sarada Devi (right)

Rabindranath’s parents: Debendranath Tagore (left) and Sarada Devi (right)

Rabindranath Tagore was born on May 7, 1861 at the Jorasanko Mansion in North Calcutta to the illustrious and wealthy Tagore family. He was the youngest surviving son of Debendranath Tagore (1817 – 1905), a Hindu philosopher, and his wife, Sarada Devi (1830 – 1875). Debendranath sought to reform the Hindu way of life, and adopted the Brahmo religion, also known as Brahmoism. Rabindranath’s grandfather, Dwarkanath Tagore (1794 – 1846), was one of the first Indian industrialists and entrepreneurs.

Rabindranath grew up in an artistic environment and was introduced to the world of music, literature, and theatre from an early age. The Tagore family were known to be ardent art-lovers and patrons of the arts, and they were a dominant force in the development of Bengali literature and culture.

Rabindranath’s grandfather, Dwarkanath Tagore, was one of the first Indian industrialists and entrepreneurs.

Rabindranath’s grandfather, Dwarkanath Tagore, was one of the first Indian industrialists and entrepreneurs.

The Jorasanko Mansion, Rabindranath’s birthplace

The Jorasanko Mansion, Rabindranath’s birthplace

Rabindranath had several distinguished siblings:

  • Dwijendranath (1840 – 1926) was a renowned philosopher and poet
  • Satyendranath (1842 – 1923) was known to be the first ethnically Indian member of the Indian Civil Service
  • Jyotirindranath (1849 – 1925) was a musician and a playwright
  • Swarnakumari Devi (1855 – 1932) was one of the pioneering female novelists in India

Debendranath Tagore was deeply influenced by the Upanishads, a collection of ancient philosophical texts written in Sanskrit regarding the concept of Hinduism; and Vedas, a collection of ancient Hindu scriptures about philosophy, hymns, and guidance on rituals for Vedic priests. In 1839, Debendranath established the Society of the Knowledge of Truth (Tattvabodhini Sabha) and in 1842, he established a well-known Brahmo treatise, the Brahmo Dharma. Debendranath instilled the value of spiritualism in Rabindranath’s mind. As a child, Rabindranath visited the Himalayas three times with his father, and during one of these journeys, they stopped at his father’s ashram and estate, Santiniketan.

Rabindranath as a teenager

Rabindranath as a teenager

As a child, Rabindranath struggled academically. He attended and dropped out from four different schools in quick succession – Oriental Seminary, Normal School, Bengal Academy, and St. Xavier’s School. He disliked the closed classroom environment and found it limiting, so his father arranged for Rabindranath to be tutored privately on Sanskrit, English, Bengali, Geometry, Physics, History, Arithmetic, Physiology, Geography, and Anatomy. He was also trained in gymnastics and wrestling. Rabindranath is said to have written his first poem at the age of eight.

When he was 11 years old, Rabindranath went on a tour across India with his father. During this journey, Rabindranath used the opportunity to read the works of famous literary writers such as Kalidasa, a renowned Sanskrit poet. After his return in 1877, he composed a long poem in the Maithili language.

During his younger days, Rabindranath was especially close to his brother, Jyotirindranath, and his wife, Kadambari Devi. Left – The Beautiful Kadambari Devi; Middle – Jyotirindranath (seated) and his wife, Kadambari Devi (right) with another couple; Right – Rabindranath and Jyotirindranath

During his younger days, Rabindranath was especially close to his brother, Jyotirindranath, and his wife, Kadambari Devi. Left – The Beautiful Kadambari Devi; Middle – Jyotirindranath (seated) and his wife, Kadambari Devi (right) with Sayendranath Tagore (standing) and his wife, Jnanadanandini Devi; Right – Rabindranath and Jyotirindranath

Among his family members, Rabindranath was especially close to his brother, Jyotirindranath, and his wife, Kadambari Devi (1858 – 1884). Kadambari Devi played an important role in refining Rabindranath’s literary talents. Kadambari Devi was nine years younger than her husband, as she was married at the age of 10 on July 5, 1868. Jyotirindranath arranged for his wife to be educated, and since she was only two years older than Rabindranath, they developed a fast friendship. Kadambari Devi inspired the young Rabindranath to pursue his literary talent. When he was older, Rabindranath remembered their relationship affectionately:

Enamelled with melody, that cloudy day on the Ganga shore survives, even now, in the jewel casket of my rain songs. I remember the gusts of wind that assailed the treetops every now and then, causing a great stirring and swaying, among the branches, the dinghies scudding along the river, their white sails tilting in the wind, the splash of tall plunging waves upon the ghat. When Bouthakrun (sister-in-law) returned, I sang the song for her. She listened in silence, without uttering a word of praise. I was 16 or 17 then. We argued about the pettiest of things, but our exchange had lost their sharpness.

Source: ‘She, my Queen, has died’- https://www.telegraphindia.com/1130915/jsp/7days/17345231.jsp

After Rabindranath lost his mother at the age of 14, Kadambari Devi became a mother figure to Rabindranath. She often cooked delicious meals for him; even when he was old and dying, Rabindranath could still remember the taste of mashed chorchori, the tasty mixed vegetables cooked with shrimp and chilies that Kadambari cooked for him.

Rare pictures of the young Rabindranath

Rare pictures of the young Rabindranath

In the evenings, Rabindranath often joined his brother and sister-in-law on the terrace garden of their two-storied house on the bank of the Ganges. Often, the garden was filled with the sweet smell of flowering shrubs of Champa, Chameli, Tuberose, and Oleander, which he remembered fondly.

Debendranath had wanted Rabindranath to become a barrister. In 1878, he sent Rabindranath to study law at the University College London but Rabindranath was not passionate. Instead, he studied the works of Shakespeare. As a result, Rabindranath returned to India in 1880 without a law degree but with many ideas on how to fuse European and Bengali tradition in his writings and art. In 1882, Rabindranath wrote one of his acclaimed nationalist poems, Nirjharer Swapna Bhanga.

University College London where Rabindranath studied for two years

University College London where Rabindranath studied for two years

In 1884, his father arranged for Rabindranath to marry 10-year old Mrinalini Devi (1872 – 1902).

In 1884, his father arranged for Rabindranath to marry 10-year old Mrinalini Devi (1872 – 1902).

In 1884, his father arranged for Rabindranath to marry 10-year old Mrinalini Devi (1872 – 1902). Four months after the wedding took place, Rabindranath encountered a major tragedy that would affect him for the rest of his life. For reasons that are not clear, his beloved sister-in-law, Kadambari Devi, committed suicide. Rabindranath was devastated by her death. For many years after her demise, Rabindranath wrote many poems and songs in her memory.

 

Marriage and Managing the Family Estate in Shelaidaha (1884 – 1901)

Left - Rabindranath and Mrinalini Devi with their first child Madhurilata Devi, 1886. Image credit- Ministry of Culture, Government of India Right - Rabindranath with his son, Rathindranath Tagore, and daughter, Madhurilata Devi

Left – Rabindranath and Mrinalini Devi with their first child Madhurilata Devi, 1886. Image credit- Ministry of Culture, Government of India
Right – Rabindranath with his son, Rathindranath Tagore, and daughter, Madhurilata Devi

Rabindranath and Mrinalini Devi had a relatively happy marriage. Mrinalini Devi was a supportive and devoted wife, and together they had two sons and three daughters: Madhurilata Devi (Bela), Rathindranath Tagore (Rathi), Renuka Devi (Rani), Mira Devi (Atasi), and Samindranath Tagore (Sami).

Tagore house in Shelaidaha

Tagore’s house in Shelaidaha

In addition to pursuing his literary aspirations, Rabindranath began to help his father. He assumed the role of secretary in his father’s Adi Brahmo Samaj (Society of Brahma). In 1891, Rabindranath’s responsibilities in managing the family businesses increased, as his father entrusted him with the management of the family estates in Shajadpur, Patisar, and Shelaidaha. These new responsibilities required Rabindranath to spend a significant amount of time on a houseboat in the Padma River, which allowed him to experience rural life, and be exposed to the life of commoners in Bengal, including their manners, customs, sorrows, sufferings, rituals, and rites.

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Rabindranath established himself as a visionary when he wrote his famous essay Swadeshi Samaj, where he elaborated his ideas on programmes that included village cooperative movements, mass education, and local self-governance to instill the spirit of self-reliance among the Bengali villagers, in order to rejuvenate their lives and give them hope. Unfortunately, his ideas did not get much support, but these challenging circumstances did not deter him, as he experimented with rural reconstruction at his family estate. Later in 1912, Rabindranath bought a large manor and the surrounding land in Surul, approximately three kilometres from Santiniketan where he established the Institute of Rural Reconstruction.

During this period, in the midst of his duties in managing the family estates, Rabindranath wrote some of his best short stories, and published them as Galpaguchcha. He also wrote various letters to his niece about the natural beauty of North Bengal. These letters were later published as Chinnapatra and Chinnapatravali. These two compilations of Rabindranath’s letters were later translated into English, and published with the title Glimpses of Bengal. Rabindranath also proved himself as a talented poet through the publication of several compilations of his poetic work such as Chaitali, Chitra, Kshanika, Sonar Tari, Kalpana, and Katha o Kahini.

Rare pictures of the young Rabindranath

Rare pictures of the young Rabindranath

Rabindranath with his son Rathindranath and daughters Madhurilata Devi, Mira Devi, Renuka Devi

Rabindranath with his son, Rathindranath, and daughters, Madhurilata Devi, Mira Devi, and Renuka Devi

Rabindranath with his newly-wedded son and daughter-in-law, Rathindranath and Pratima Devi.

Rabindranath with his newly-wedded son and daughter-in-law, Rathindranath and Pratima Devi.

Rabindranath and his family

Rabindranath and his family

 

Santiniketan

The green expanse of Santiniketan

The green expanse of Santiniketan

Debendranath Tagore had visited in Santiniketan 1862 while touring his family estates. When he meditated under a Chatim tree and found peace of mind, Debendranath named the place Santiniketan, which means ‘abode of peace’, and established a family estate there. Many years later, his youngest son, Rabindranath, visited the place and experienced the same peace and calm, which inspired him to share Santiniketan and establish a meaningful destination for the world. He reflected this aspiration in a letter to his wife:

Today I arrived in Santiniketan and immersed myself in an ocean of peace. Unless one comes down here, it is not possible to imagine from a distance how much one needs to come here. I feel as if I am alone – surrounded by the boundless sky, wind, and light, seated in the lap of the primal mother…

– Rabindranath Tagore, in a letter to his wife Mrinalini Devi
(Santiniketan, July 20, 1901)

Source: https://happinesshomeandhealth.wordpress.com/2016/01/13/santiniketan-the-soul-of-rabindranath-tagore/

 

Patha Bhavana (Institution of Primary and Secondary Education)

The students of Patha Bhavana

The students of Patha Bhavana

In 1901, Rabindranath established Patha Bhavana, formerly known as Brahmacharya Ashram, with the help of Brahmabandhav Upadhyay, a Roman Catholic, as a school for children. This venture revealed his true mind as a visionary, as his straightforward and path-defying ideas about education embodied the principles of ancient Indian hermitages, and purported to encourage children to grow into responsible, sensible, and mature individuals.

Rabindranath had reservations about teaching students within a crammed four-wall classroom because he believed that the walls represented the conditioning of the mind. He believed that children should be taught beneath the open skies, under the cool shade of trees, that teachers should not limit themselves and not be afraid to borrow ideas from various sources, come up with their own hypotheses, and be forward-thinking, open-minded, and willing to learn new things as they taught. Rabindranath was so passionate about this project that he moved his whole family to Santiniketan and enrolled his son Rathindranath as the first student in this school.

Rabindranath believed that children should be taught beneath the open skies under the cool shade of trees.

Rabindranath believed that children should be taught beneath the open skies under the cool shade of trees.

However, this venture was met with obstacles and funding constraints as initially only a few students were interested to study at Patha Bhavana. In the book, Letters by Tagore Volume I, several letters Rabindranath wrote to his family members, including his wife Mrinalini Devi, reflected his anxiety about the funding constraints to develop this education institution, and his feeling of helplessness.

To meet the growing expenses, Rabindranath sold one of his personal properties in Puri, and Mrinalini Devi voluntarily parted with her jewellery in order to support her husband’s venture. While Rabindranath managed the school, Mrinalini Devi took care of the students in the boarding house. Unfortunately, the ideal family life in Santiniketan did not last for long. In 1902, Mrinalini Devi fell ill and was taken to Calcutta to receive better medical care. Tragically, she passed away. The demise of his wife was the start of a period of grief for Tagore. His married daughter, Renuka, passed away two years later in 1904. His beloved father, Debendranath, passed away in 1905, and his beloved son Shamindranath passed away in 1907. In the midst of personal tragedy, Rabindranath continued his venture to provide others with an education.

 

Kala Bhavana (Institute of Fine Arts)

Kala Bhavana

Kala Bhavana

In the process of developing his educational venture, Rabindranath continued to learn from his travels around the world. He learned about local cultures and evaluated how nature influenced the daily lives of local people. Trying to figure out how he could bring the positive influences of these places back to Santiniketan, Rabindranath invited artists, academics, and scholars to share their knowledge with his fellow Indians in Santiniketan.

After his first venture with Patha Bhavana, Rabindranath established the Institution of Education and Research in Visual Arts, Kala Bhavana, in 1919. Rabindranath understood very well that art could be a powerful tool for conveying the message of nationalism. Rabindranath encouraged artists to break away from tradition, preferring them to be inspired by the daily objects used in life, the screen paintings of Japan, and by nature. Rabindranath established Kala Bhavana with these thoughts in mind, and Rabindranath mentored Nandalal Bose (1882 – 1966), one of the pioneers of modern Indian art, who had previously been mentored by Rabindranath’s nephew, Abanindranath Tagore in Calcutta.

Another picture of Kala Bhavana

Another picture of Kala Bhavana

Since its establishment, Kala Bhavana has produced many renowned artists, including:

  • Ramkinkar Baij (1906 – 1980) – an award-winning Indian sculptor and painter, considered to be one of the pioneers of modern Indian sculpture
  • Beohar Rammanohar Sinha (1929 – 2007) – an Indian artist best known for his illustrations in the Constitution of India’s original manuscript
  • Raman Siva Kumar (b. 1956) – an internationally-acclaimed contemporary Indian curator, art critic, and art historian
  • Achutan Ramachandran Nair (b. 1935) – an Indian painter awarded the Padma Bhushan, India’s third highest civilian honour for his outstanding service to the nation
  • Satyajit Ray (1921 – 1992) – an Indian author and filmmaker considered to be one of the greatest filmmakers of the 20th century.
Rabanindranath and Satyajit Ray

Rabindranath and Satyajit Ray

 

Visva Bharati University

Visva Bharati University

Visva Bharati University

In 1916 – 1917, during his visit to the United States, Rabindranath was inspired by the diversity of the American population that had a mixture of different cultures, creeds, and nationalities. The experience caused Rabindranath to rethink the relationship between the individual and the world, and to establish an international centre of humanistic studies.

In 1921, Rabindranath established Visva Bharati University in Santiniketan with the Nobel Prize money he received in 1913, and his son, Rathindranath, became the first vice chancellor (upacharya) for the new university. Rabindranath established Visva Bharati with the idea that every individual is a genius, but not all of them bloom at the same time. Therefore, at Visva Bharati, the students were allowed to continue their course until both the teacher and the students were satisfied. If a course demanded by the students was not available, the university would design the course and bring in teachers for that course regardless if there was a commercial demand for it or not. Kala Bhavana became one of the faculties in Visva Bharati, and in 1951, the government of independent India granted the institution the status of a full university.

Visva Bharati University

Visva Bharati University

 

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Rabindranath the Writer, Poet, and Playwright

After he wrote his first poem at the age of 8, Rabindranath’s literary talents continued to blossom. He dedicated the poems he composed between the ages of 13 and 18 to his beloved sister-in-law, Kadambari Devi. Rabindranath wrote most of these poems sitting next to her, and there were many affectionate moments with Kadambari Devi that were immortalised in these poems.

In 1874, his poem Abhilash (Desire) was published anonymously in his father’s weekly newspaper Tattwabodhini Patrika (Truth Searching Newspaper). Rabindranath’s first poem published under his name was Banaphul (Wild Flower), in the Jnanankar Magazine in 1876. Around this time, he also composed several poems under the pseudonym ‘Bhanusinha Thakur’.

Although Rabindranath was a renowned poet, he was also an accomplished short story writer, novelist, playwright, lyricist, and essayist. Most of his writings reflected his love of nature and brought awareness to social issues, customs, and tenets, such as child marriage, rigid customs and norms, his criticism of societal dogmas, and the role of women in a male dominated society

In 1877, Dwijendranath Tagore, one of Rabindranath’s brothers, established Bharati, a monthly magazine. Rabindranath made regular contributions to the magazine by writing essays, poems, and literary criticisms. In 1878, his first book containing a collection of his poems, Kabi-Kahini, was published.

In 1878, when he attended University College London, Rabindranath took time to study European music and English literature. He also contributed a series of Letters from Europe (Prabasir Patra) to Bharati that recorded his impression of the English people and England. Around this time, Rabindranath started to write his first play, Bhagna Hriday (Broken Heart) that would later be published in 1881.

Rabindranath played the lead role in the premier of his first Bengali opera, Valmiki Pratibha

Rabindranath played the lead role in the premier of his first Bengali opera, Valmiki Pratibha

Although he returned from London without his degree in law, Rabindranath returned to India as a man with a refined taste in music. In 1881, he wrote Valmiki Pratibha (Genius of Valmiki), his first Bengali opera with a fusion of Western and Indian music. Valmiki Pratibha was performed for the first time at the Tagore family home, the Jorasanko Mansion, in the presence of distinguished personalities such as Indian author Bankimchandra Chatterjee. Rabindranath played the lead role in the premiere, which marked the start of his career in theatrical performances.

In 1882, Rabindranath published another compilation of poems that included the iconic Nirjharer Swapnabhanga, about his mystic vision where men and nature bathed together in streams of joy, which unleashed and liberated his poetic genius. After this event, Rabindranath published his plays, poetry complications, essays, and novels one after another, in quick succession:

No. Title Year
1. Bouthakuranir Hat 1883
2. Chhabi o Gan 1884
3. Prakritir Pratishodh 1884
4. Kodi o Komal 1886
5. Rajarshi 1887
6. Mayar Khala 1888
7. Manasi 1890

In 1901, after he moved to Santiniketan, Rabindranath composed Naivedra and Khenya, which were published in 1901 and 1906 respectively. Around that time, Rabindranath was immensely popular amongst Bengali readers.

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Rabindranath continued his career as a prolific writer. In 1910, he published his most notable work, Gitanjali (the Songs of Offering), a collection of 157 poems on themes of spirituality, nature, complicated human emotions, and suffering. Gitanjali was translated into English in 1912 and brought Rabindranath much success, acclaim, and earned him a Nobel Prize in 1913. One year after the India Society published the English version of Gitanjali, the book would be reprinted over a dozen times in the subsequent 12 months alone. Another of his notable and popular works is Galpaguchchha, a collection of 61 short stories on illiteracy, femininity, marriage, and poverty.

Ghare Baire (The Home and the World)

Ghare Baire (The Home and the World)

When the opportunity came to have his work translated into foreign languages, Rabindranath chose to translate his works that had mystical and spiritual themes. These themes appealed to Western readers, and established his reputation as a mystic in the Western world. In 1912, Rabindranath went to England and showed his translated works to prominent European writers such as William Butler Yeats, Robert Bridges, Thomas Sturge Moore, Ezra Pound, and Ernest Rhys. His works were well-received and won critical acclaim from these writers.

In 1916, Rabindranath infused the idea of dynamism in his writings which were later collected in his works titled Balaka, Chaturanga, and Ghare Baire. Throughout his life, Rabindranath continued to write prolifically. Some of his other well-known works include novels such as Sesher Kabita and Jogagog, plays such as Tapati and Seshraksha, compilations of poetry such as Mahua, and musical dramas such as Rituranga.

 

Rabindranath the Songwriter

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Rabindranath composed over 2,230 songs during his lifetime, including the national anthem of India, ‘Jana Gana Mana’, and the national anthem of Bangladesh ‘Amar Sonar Bangla’.

A collection of his songs, called Rabindra Sangeet, covered various topics from introspection, psychology, yearning, romance, nostalgia, reflection, modernism, humanism, and even structuralism. Rabindra Sangeet appealed to all social strata and backgrounds, as they were filled with beauty and emotive strength. Through his songs, Rabindranath sought to give voice to all, rich and poor. Rabindranath primarily worked with two subjects: human beings, and how nature affected the expression and behaviour of human beings.

Through his travels around the world, Rabindranath became familiar with the musical styles and narratives of South India and the West. Although Rabindranath never classified his songs, after his passing, those who wanted to preserve his work felt the need to categorise them. In general, his songs are classified as follows:

  • Devotional (Puja Porjaay)
  • Romantic (Prem Porjaay)
  • Seasonal (Prokriti Porjaay) – Spring (Boshonto), Monsoon (Borsha), Summer (Grishho), Autumn (Shorot), Early winter (Hemonto), Winter (Sheet)
  • Diverse (Bichitro)
  • Patriotic (Deshattobodhok)
  • Songs for certain occasions (Aanushtthanik)
  • Songs for dance-dramas and plays

What music critics said about Rabindra Sangeet:

[Rabindra Sangeet] transcend the mundane to the aesthetic and express all ranges and categories of human emotion. The poet gave voice to all – big or small, rich or poor. The poor Ganges boatman and the rich landlord air their emotions in them. They birthed a distinctive school of music whose practitioners can be fiercely traditional.

– Dhan Gopal Mukerji, the first successful Indian Man of Letters

[t]here is in Bengal no cultured home where Rabindranath’s songs are not sung or at least attempted to be sung… Even illiterate villagers sing his songs.

– Modern Review, a Calcutta based magazine

[Rabindra Sangeet is a] vehicle of a personality … [that] go behind this or that system of music to that beauty of sound which all systems put out their hands to seize.

– A.H. Fox Strangways (1859 – 1948), Chief Music Critic for the Observer

In 1931 and 1932, three volumes of Gitabitan (Garden of Songs), the books that contain the collection of all 2,233 songs written by Rabindranath, were published.

 

Bangladesh National Anthem


Or view the video on the server at:
https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/BangladeshAnthem.mp4

 

Indian National Anthem


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https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/IndianAnthem.mp4

 

Selected Popular Songs from Rabindra Sangeet


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https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/RabindraSangeet.mp4

 

Rabindranath the Actor, Producer, and Choreographer

Rabindranath was a talented actor, producer, and choreographer

Rabindranath was a talented actor, producer, and choreographer

After his 1881 debut as an actor in his first musical drama Valmiki Pratibha, Rabindranath continued to act in his own plays. He was a talented actor with a powerful tenor voice, which could reach the furthest corners of the auditorium when he sang or spoke, and he could turn his voice into a powerful tool to communicate his art.

Rabindranath was not satisfied just to have his writings printed. As soon as he composed his writings, he would hunt for an audience. According to Sisirkumar Bhaduri, a Bengali stage personality, he was amazed with the way Rabindranath used his arms on stage ‘in gestures that lay a spell on the whole audience’ at a time when most actors thought that the use of arms were an embarrassment or simply did not know how to use them.

In addition to being a talented actor, Rabindranath was a competent, imaginative, meticulous, and conscientious producer and choreographer. All the plays he produced were preceded by long periods of rehearsals where he spared no one, including himself. In the dance dramas that he wrote, Rabindranath was not merely satisfied with writing the tune and the play, but he would also make sure that the dance would interpret his songs appropriately.

Rabindranath with Tasher Desh drama group

Rabindranath with Tasher Desh drama group

Rabindranath with a group of girls in costume for a Drama Performance

Rabindranath with a group of girls in costume for a Drama Performance

Rabindranath on stage as Raghupati

Rabindranath on stage as Raghupati

 

Rabindranath the Painter

Left - Rabindranath at his painting desk, Government School of Art, Calcutta 1932 Right - One of Rabindranath's paintings

Left – Rabindranath at his painting desk, Government School of Art, Calcutta 1932
Right – One of Rabindranath’s paintings, Veiled Woman – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Rabindranath only began exploring the visual arts in the form of paintings and drawings in his late 60s, but even though he started painting late in life, he was still very prolific. He produced 2,500 drawings and paintings during his lifetime, and became the first Indian artist whose works were exhibited in the United States, Russia, and across Europe. His first exhibition was held at the Pigalle Gallery in Paris, followed by England, Germany, and Denmark. His admirers around the world were amazed at this new display of creativity.

Rabindranath’s painting style was characterised by a rhythmic quality and simple bold forms, and have since inspired modern Indian artists. His paintings revolved around the following themes:

  • Animals or imaginary creatures imbued with vitality and humour
  • Human figures with expressive gestures
  • Human faces
  • Landscapes

 

Awards and Accolades

Rabindranath’s Nobel Prize in Literature

Rabindranath’s Nobel Prize in Literature

Rabindranath’s accomplishments as an artist was further confirmed by the awards and accolades that he received during his lifetime. In 1913, Rabindranath became the first Indian to win a Nobel Prize in Literature for Gitanjali. He won the award due to “his profoundly sensitive, fresh, and beautiful verse, by which, with consummate skill, he has made his poetic thought, expressed in his own English words, a part of the literature of the West.”

In 1915, George V of England granted Rabindranath a knighthood, and the West Bengal government, Indian government, and many private firms showed their reverence to Rabindranath by opening many charitable organisations, health centres, and institutions in the name of Rabindranath. One of these institutions is the Rabindra Bharati University, which is currently located at Jorasanko Mansion, the Tagore family home in Calcutta.

In 1931, Rabindranath’s 70th birthday was celebrated on a grand scale, marked by the publication of The Golden Book of Tagore, which contains glowing tributes from great women and men of the world. In 1940, Oxford University awarded Rabindranath with the title Doctorate of Literature, and in 1961, the Indian Postal Department released a stamp in the name of Rabindranath as a tribute to the great poet.

On Rabindranath’s 70th birthday in 1931, The Golden Book of Tagore which contains the glowing tributes to the poet from the great women and men of the world was published.

On Rabindranath’s 70th birthday in 1931, The Golden Book of Tagore which contains the glowing tributes to the poet from the great women and men of the world was published.

In 1940, Oxford University awarded Rabindranath with the title Doctorate of Literature

In 1940, Oxford University awarded Rabindranath with the title Doctorate of Literature

In 1961, Indian Postal Department released stamps in the name of Rabindranath as a tribute to the great poet.

In 1961, the Indian Postal Department released stamps with the likeness and name of Rabindranath as a tribute to the great poet.

 

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Rabindranath and Politics

Rabin035

Between the late 1890s and the first decade of the 20th century, the nationalist movement was rampant in India. Although he was not a politician and did not hold any official position in the government, Rabindranath was a patriot and an astute political analyst. He contributed articles on the subject of politics in various periodicals, such as Bharati, Bangadarshan, and Sadhana. In 1896, Rabindranath sang Vande Mataram, a poem composed by Bankin Chandra Chattopadhyay that is synonymous with the Indian independence movement at the Congress Session inauguration in Calcutta.

In July 1905, when the Viceroy of India, Lord Curzon, announced the Separation of Bengal which divided the eastern Muslim area from the western Hindu area, Rabindranath became involved with the Swadeshi Movement, which took the form of an economic strategy that was aimed at removing the British Empire from power and improving India’s economic condition.

Rabindranath and Mahatma Gandhi

Rabindranath and Mahatma Gandhi

Nationalism contains Rabindranath’s opinion on the nationalism in the West, Japan, and India

Nationalism contains Rabindranath’s opinion on the nationalism in the West, Japan, and India

In 1914, Rabindranath met with Mahatma Gandhi for the first time when one of Rabindranath’s best friends, C.F. Andrews, brought students from Phoenix School in South Africa to Santiniketan. Upon observing the life in Santiniketan, Gandhi suggested that the daily chores were to be done by the students, and not by the servants. Rabindranath agreed with the idea, and since then, Gandhi Punyaha is celebrated in Santiniketan through self-service on March 10. Since the first fateful meeting, Rabindranath and Gandhi became lifelong friends, with Gandhi referring to Rabindranath as Gurudev.

During his journey to Japan and the United States in 1916 – 1917, Rabindranath gave a series of lectures in Japan, and warned against the militarism and fanatic nationalism in Japan, reminding the Japanese of their noble culture. It seems that Rabindranath had predicted that Japanese fanatic nationalism would contribute to the disasters of World War II. In the United States, Rabindranath continued to give lectures on Nationalism, which were later compiled into the book Personality that was published in 1917.

An artist illustration of Jallianwala Bagh massacre

An artist’s illustration of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre

Back in India in 1918, Rabindranath was caught in more political turmoil. While activists under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi were negotiating to gain swaraj (self-rule) from the British, a group of youths was initiating an armed revolution to gain their freedom from Britain. The British established the Rowlatt Committee to investigate and report on the subject, which resulted in the Rowlatt Act that allowed certain political cases to be tried without a jury and/or imprisonment of the subjects without trial.

The Rowlatt Act provoked dissatisfaction amongst Indians, and resulted in strong protests from all over India. On April 13, 1919, a crowd of non-violent protesters gathered in Jallianwala Bagh to protest the Rowlatt Act. The British Indian Army, under the leadership of Colonel Reginald Dyer, fired mercilessly at the protesters and killed hundreds of people in the process. In protest of this unimaginable cruelty, Rabindranath chose to renounce the knighthood that was conferred upon him by the British crown in 1915 in a famous letter to Lord Chelmsford:

Your Excellency,

The enormity of the measures taken by the Government in the Punjab for quelling some local disturbances has, with a rude shock, revealed to our minds the helplessness of our position as British subjects in India. The disproportionate severity of the punishments inflicted upon the unfortunate people and the methods of carrying them out, we are convinced, are without parallel in the history of civilised governments, barring some conspicuous exceptions, recent and remote. Considering that such treatment has been meted out to a population, disarmed and resourceless, by a power which has the most terribly efficient organisation for destruction of human lives, we must strongly assert that it can claim no political expediency, far less moral justification. The accounts of the insults and sufferings by our brothers in Punjab have trickled through the gagged silence, reaching every corner of India, and the universal agony of indignation roused in the hearts of our people has been ignored by our rulers—possibly congratulating themselves for what they imagine as salutary lessons. This callousness has been praised by most of the Anglo-Indian papers, which have in some cases gone to the brutal length of making fun of our sufferings, without receiving the least check from the same authority—relentlessly careful in smothering every cry of pain and expression of judgement from the organs representing the sufferers. Knowing that our appeals have been in vain and that the passion of vengeance is blinding the nobler vision of statesmanship in our Government, which could so easily afford to be magnanimous as befitting its physical strength and moral tradition, the very least that I can do for my country is to take all consequences upon myself in giving voice to the protest of the millions of my countrymen, surprised into a dumb anguish of terror. The time has come when badges of honour make our shame glaring in the incongruous context of humiliation, and I for my part wish to stand, shorn of all special distinctions, by the side of those of my countrymen, who, for their so-called insignificance, are liable to suffer degradation not fit for human beings.

These are the reasons which have painfully compelled me to ask Your Excellency, with due reference and regret, to relieve me of my title of Knighthood, which I had the honour to accept from His Majesty the King at the hands of your predecessor, for whose nobleness of heart I still entertain great admiration.

Yours faithfully,
Rabindranath Tagore

Source: Selected Letters of Rabindranath Tagore
Letter published in Modern Review (Calcutta monthly), July 1919

In 1922, Rabindranath staged his first play that carried themes of nationalism, Muktadhara. In 1924, Rabindranath went to China together with Kalidas Nag (1892 – 1966), an Indian historian, parliamentarian, and author. Rabindranath was attracted to the leadership of Sun Yat-sen (1866 – 1925), the founding father of the Republic of China. In China, Rabindranath delivered a series of lectures about Eastern ideals and the disadvantages of excessive materialism in various universities in Hangchow, Shanghai, Beijing and Nanjing.

Rabindranath in China with Chinese academics at Tsinghua University in 1924.

Rabindranath in China with Chinese academics at Tsinghua University in 1924.

In 1932, Mahatma Gandhi undertook a fast unto death in protest of the caste separation in Jarbeda Prison imposed by the British government in India. Rabindranath wrote a letter to Gandhi to express his solidarity and respect to him. He also went to Jarbeda Prison to be at Mahatma Gandhi’s side. When a deal was reached with the British Government and Mahatma Gandhi ended his fast, Rabindranath sang his famous song, ‘When the Heart is Hard and Parched Up.’

In 1940, one year before Rabindranath’s passing, Mahatma Gandhi visited him in Santiniketan. During this time, Rabindranath expressed his wish for Mahatma Gandhi to look after his beloved Visva Bharati.

Another picture of Rabindranath and Mahatma Gandhi

Another picture of Rabindranath and Mahatma Gandhi

Rabindranath and Jawaharlal Nehru. The picture was taken in Bolpur, Bengal on November 4, 1936.

Rabindranath and Jawaharlal Nehru. The picture was taken in Bolpur, Bengal on November 4, 1936.

 

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Rabindranath and Buddhism

Left - Buddha statue at Visva Bharati University in Santiniketan Right - Rabindranath with William Pearson and Paul Risher and wife in front of the Great Buddha of Kamakura in Japan

Left – Buddha statue at Visva Bharati University in Santiniketan
Right – Rabindranath with William Pearson and Paul Risher and wife in front of the Great Buddha of Kamakura in Japan

Although Rabindranath played an important role in the development of Brahmoism, he had a deep respect and admiration for Lord Buddha Shakyamuni and the Buddhist doctrines. Rabindranath admired the spirit of compassion and mercy of Lord Buddha.

Rabindranath delivered a lecture at the Mahabodhi Society in Calcutta during the anniversary of Lord Buddha’s birth, where he expressed his personal feelings on Lord Buddha. The lecture was later published in Provasi, a Bengali journal, under the title Buddhadeva (Lord Buddha). In his various poems, essays, lectures, and novel, Rabindranath used superlative words to describe Lord Buddha such as “an eminent or distinguished personage” (mahäpuruSah), “the most excellent human being” (sarvasresthamänava), “great serene” (mahäsänta), “the chief of men” (narottama), “most sacred” (mahäpunya), “most peaceful (mahäkSema), “the compassionate one” (karunämaya), “the illimitable light” (amitäbha), “the greatest monk” (mahäbhikSu), and so forth.

Rabindranath’s affection and admiration for Lord Buddha was apparent in his presidential address on the anniversary of Buddha’s enlightenment (Buddha Purnima) on May 18, 1935:

On this full-moon day of Vaisakha I have come to join in the birthday celebrations of the Lord Buddha and to bow my head in reverence to him whom I regard in my inmost being as the greatest man ever born on this earth. This is no formal demonstration of adoration on my part, befitting the occasion. I offer him here, today, the homage I have offered him again and again in the deep privacy of my soul.

– Rabindranath Tagore
May 18, 1935

Another reference to Rabindranath’s admiration for Lord Buddha can be seen in his poem titled Siam:

Still on his lotus seat!
Lord Buddha is ever there –
Whose silence imparts infinite peace?
Whose speech is the soothing flow of forgiveness?
In another poem, Mülyapräpti, we have a similar description:
In the hushed shade of the mango grove beyond the city wall Sudas stood before
Lord Buddha, on whose lips sat the silence of love and whose eyes beamed peace
like the morning star of the dew-washed autumn.

– Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath’s nephew, Abanindranath Tagore (1871 – 1951) shared his reverence for Lord Buddha. Abanindranath was a famous painter. During his lifetime, he painted several paintings on Buddhism.

Paintings of Lord Buddha by Abanindranath Tagore. Left - Buddha as Medicant (1914) Right - The Victory of Buddha (1914)

Paintings of Lord Buddha by Abanindranath Tagore. Left – Buddha as Medicant (1914); Right – The Victory of Buddha (1914)

 

Selected poems on Lord Buddha composed by Rabindranath

THE DUE PRICE

It was a wintry night in the month of Agrahayan
There was a heavy fall of dew
All the lotus flowers were destroyed
Save one that somehow survived
In the pond of Sudas, the florist.
He plucked it and went to the palace gate
Seeking to see the king.
A passer-by saw the flower
He was filled with joy and said,
‘I want to buy this off-season lotus
What is its price?
It will be my offering to Lord Buddha
Who is now staying in the city ‘.
‘I expect one grain of gold’, said Sudas,
Which the man agreed to pay.
At that very moment king Prasenjit
Suddenly came out of his palace
He was on his way to see Lord Buddha
Carrying many offerings
And singing the Lord’s praise.
He also offered to buy that flower
To present it to the Lord
And asked its price.
The florist told the king
‘It has already been sold to this man
At a price of one grain of gold’.
‘I shall pay ten grains’, says the king.
The man says, ‘I shall pay twenty’.
None was ready to give up,
They went on bidding
And the price went higher and higher.
The florist thought
His flower must fetch much much more
From the man for whom these two want it to buy.
So he told them I won’t sell the flower
I have changed my mind.
He rushed to the grove
Which was filled with light
By Buddha’s presence.
Seated in the posture of a lotus,
Smiling and calm,
The Lord was an embodiment of joy
Peace was raining from his look
And mercy from his face.
Sudas kept on gazing at the Lord
With his eyes wide open
And he was speechless.
Suddenly he fell himself down on the floor
And placed the flower on Buddha’s feet.
The Lord smiled and asked him in a sweet voice,
‘What is it that you want, my son?’
Choked with emotion Sudas said, ‘My Lord,
Nothing more than a grain of dust of your feet’.

– Transcreation of the poem Mulyaprapti from the collection Katha by Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath at Borobudur Temple, one of the most famous Buddhist pilgrimage places in Indonesia

Rabindranath at Borobudur Temple, one of the most famous Buddhist pilgrimage places in Indonesia

BORO-BUDUR

THE SUN shone on a far-away morning, while the forest murmured its hymn of praise to light; and the hills, veiled in vapour, dimly glimmered like earth’s dream in purple.
The King sat alone in the coconut grove, his eyes drowned in a vision, his heart exultant with the rapturous hope of spreading the chant of adoration along the unending path of time:
‘Let Buddha be my refuge.’
His words found utterance in a deathless speech of delight, in an ecstasy of forms.
The island took it upon her heart; her hill raised it to the sky.
Age after age, the morning sun daily illumined its great meaning.
While the harvest was sown and reaped in the near-by fields by the stream, and life, with its chequered light, made pictured shadows on its epochs of changing screen, the prayer, once Uttered in the quiet green of an ancient morning, ever rose in the midst of the hide-and-seek of tumultuous time:
‘Let Buddha be my refuge.’
The King, at the end of his days, is merged in the shadow of a nameless night among the unremembered, leaving his salutation in an imperishable rhythm of stone which ever cries:
‘Let Buddha be my refuge.’
Generations of pilgrims came on the quest of an immortal voice for their worship; and this sculptured hymn, in a grand symphony of gestures, took up their lowly names and uttered for them:
‘Let Buddha be my refuge.’
The spirit of those words has been muffled in mist in this mocking age of unbelief, and the curious crowds gather here to gloat in the gluttony of an irreverent sight.
Man to-day has no peace,his heart arid with pride. He clamours for an ever-increasing speed in a fury of chase for objects that ceaselessly run, but never reach a meaning.
And now is the time when he must come groping at last to the sacred silence, which stands still in the midst of surging centuries of noise, till he feels assured that in an immeasurable love dwells the final meaning of Freedom, whose prayer is:
‘Let Buddha be my refuge.’

– Rabindranath Tagore

 

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Travels and Meetings with Other Famous Personalities

Rabindranath was a widely-travelled man. During his lifetime, he visited over 30 countries on five continents.

In 1912, Rabindranath visited England with his son and daughter-in-law. During this visit, he brought the English version of Gitanjali, which he had translated, and showed it to William Rothenstein (1872 –1945), an English painter and printmaker whom he had previously met during the latter’s visit to Calcutta in 1911. Rothenstein introduced Rabindranath to renowned writers such as C.F. Andrews (1871 – 1940) and W.B. Yeats (1865 – 1939). They became lifelong friends and would later sometimes travel together. Many Europeans regarded Rabindranath as a great visionary and poet from the East.

Rabindranath and William Rothenstein

Rabindranath and William Rothenstein

After his successful visit to England, Rabindranath went to the United States to deliver a series of lectures on human relationships and the cosmos. This series of lectures were later published as a book titled Sadhana (1913). One month after Rabindranath returned to India in October 1913, he received the happy news that he had won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Between May 1916 and April 1917, Rabindranath visited Japan and the United States to deliver a series of lectures on Nationalism and Personality. Rabindranath’s good friends, William Pearson (1881 – 1923) and C.F. Andrews accompanied him during his visit to Japan.

Rabindranath in Japan in 1916

Rabindranath in Japan in 1916

Rabindranath at Tomitaro Hara’s Sankeien, Yokohama 1916 Mukul Dey Archives

Rabindranath at Tomitaro Hara’s Sankeien, Yokohama (1916). Photo: Mukul Dey Archives

Rabindranath during his tour to the West in 1921

Rabindranath during his tour to the West in 1921

Between the 1920s and 1930s, Rabindranath travelled extensively, visiting various places around the world including Europe, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. In each of the places he visited, he gained large followings and countless admirers.

Rabindranath visited Germany after World War I in 1921 to infuse the spirit of courage and consolation that were very much needed by the Germans who had just suffered from a humiliating defeat. Prior to visiting Germany, Rabindranath expressed his sympathy for the Germans and his intention to visit for the purpose of giving them strength. During his month-long visit from one city to another, Rabindranath managed to fascinate his German audiences. The German press reported his every movement, and the halls where he was scheduled to speak were always packed. There were some reports of fights among those who were refused entry.

Rabindranath revisited Germany again in 1926 and 1930. Rabindranath continued to enthuse German audiences and readers until the Nazi Germany viewed him as an anathema and suppressed his popularity.

In addition to Europe, India and the United States, Rabindranath enjoyed immense popularity in Russia as attested by Nicholas Roerich and Anatoly Lunacharsky, The Soviet Minister of Education:

Gitanjali came like a revelation. The poems were read at gatherings and a private ‘at homes.’ Only true talent could create such a precious mutual understanding. Now everyone at once became imbued with love for Tagore. It was evident how most contradictory people, the most irreconcilable psychologists were united by the call of the poet.

– Nicholas Roerich on Rabindranath Tagore

Tagore’s works are so full of colour, subtle spiritual experiences and truly noble ideas that they now constitute a treasure of human culture.

– Anatoly Lunacharsky in his article ‘The Indian Tolstoy’

Rabindranath visited the Soviet Union in September 1930 at the invitation of Anatoly Lunacharsky. In Moscow, his paintings were exhibited, and he had the opportunity to discuss about post-czarist Russia with distinguished citizens of that country. These discussions were later collected and published in a book titled Russiar Chithi.

Rabindranath with the school children in the Soviet Union

Rabindranath with school children in the Soviet Union

Rabindranath in front of Hotel Gellert, Budapest On his right are Prashanta and Nirmal Kumari (Rani) Mahalanobis

Rabindranath in front of Hotel Gellert, Budapest. On his right are Prashanta and Nirmal Kumari (Rani) Mahalanobis

From Russia, Rabindranath travelled to the United States to exhibit his paintings and returned to India in January 1931. This was his last journey to the West.

During his travels around the world to deliver various lectures to express his ideas of humanity, Rabindranath had the opportunity to meet with famous personalities to discuss various topics and issues. The following are some of the personalities that he met during his travels.

 

W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats

On July 7, 1912, Sir William Rothenstein introduced Rabindranath to W.B. Yeats. Prior to this meeting, William Rothenstein had passed the English translation of Gitanjali to the Irish poet, who immediately burst into praise. He was known to have said:

If someone were to say he could improve this piece of writing, that person did not understand literature.

– W.B. Yeats on Rabindranath’s Gitanjali

W.B. Yeats agreed to write an introduction to Rabindranath’s Gitanjali where he wrote about how moved he was by the lyrics of the poems:

I have carried the manuscript of these translations about with me for days, reading it in railway trains, or on the top of omnibuses and in restaurants, and I have often had to close it lest some stranger would see how much it moved me. These lyrics… display in their thought a world I have dreamed of all my live [sic] long… a tradition, where poetry and religion are the same thing.

– W.B. Yeats on Gitanjali

Just like others of Rabindranath’s Western admirers, W.B. Yeats was drawn to the devotional and religious nature of the Rabindranath’s poetry that pervaded all class distinctions, backgrounds, and nationalities. After this fateful meeting, Rabindranath went to the United States to deliver a series of lectures at Harvard University. During his absence, W.B. Yeats, who was by then an established poet in London cultural’s scene, praised Rabindranath in the circles where he had influence. By the time Rabindranath returned to Britain, he had become “the latest epitome of all stereotypes oriental”.

Rabindranath enjoyed immense popularity in Europe. This picture was taken during one of his visits to London.

Rabindranath enjoyed immense popularity in Europe. This picture was taken during one of his visits to London.

 

Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig (1881 – 1941) was a novelist and a humanitarian who lived in Salzburg, Austria. In the summer of 1921, Kurt Wolff, the German publisher of Rabindranath’s books, introduced Stefan Zweig to Rabindranath when the latter visited Austria.

Stefan Zweig was an altruistic humanitarian who had had the opportunity to visit India in the winter of 1908 – 1909. He was deeply affected by the misery and poverty that he saw in that country. Upon his return to Austria, Zweig remained interested in India’s intellectual life and struggle for freedom, and observed Rabindranath’s rise to fame in Europe. Zweig discussed and exchanged views on Rabindranath with another European intellectual, Romain Rolland (1866 – 1944), and in the process developed an admiration for the Indian poet. Therefore, when Kurt Wolff informed him that Rabindranath was to transit in Salzburg on the way to Vienna, Zweig jumped at a chance to meet with him. The short meeting made a deep impression on Zweig, and he wrote to Kurt Wolff:

Thank you very much for the information regarding Tagore’s travel programme. This enabled me to spend half an hour in his company today at Salzburg railway station while he changed trains. Thanks to you, I have encountered this great personality, of whom I formed a strong and profound impression.

– Stefan Zweig

After the meeting, Stefan Zweig continued to observe the growth of Rabindranath’s influence in Europe. While he appreciated Rabindranath’s message of humanism, he was not particularly fond of Rabindranath’s penchant to seek publicity.

Rabindranath and Romain Rolland

Rabindranath and Romain Rolland

Rabindranath and Kurt Wolff

Rabindranath and Kurt Wolff

 

Victoria Ocampo

Rabindranath and Victoria Ocampo

Rabindranath and Victoria Ocampo

While travelling to Peru by invitation from the Peruvian government to celebrate the country’s independence, Rabindranath fell ill and had to recuperate in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Victoria Ocampo (1890 – 1979), a distinguished female intellectual, poet, and Argentine aristocrat, offered her care and hospitality to Rabindranath. This fateful encounter was the start of a lifelong relationship. Rabindranath immortalised Victoria Ocampo in his poems that were included in the book compilation of his poems, titled Purabi.

 

Albert Einstein

Rabindranath and Albert Einstein

Rabindranath and Albert Einstein

On July 14, 1930, Rabindranath met with the famous scientist Albert Einstein in the latter’s house in Caputh, near Berlin. The two great men discussed and explored the fundamental questions of existence, and touched on the subjects of science, consciousness, beauty, and philosophy. The exchange was recorded and published in the 1931 issue of Modern Review.

This exchange more than 80 years ago still resonates with us today because despite the advances in science, the questions of fundamental truth, the nature of the universe are still relevant to modern lives.

 

When Einstein Met Tagore: A Remarkable Meeting of Minds on the Edge of Science and Spirituality

Collision and convergence in Truth and Beauty.

BY MARIA POPOVA

On July 14, 1930, Albert Einstein welcomed into his home on the outskirts of Berlin the Indian philosopher, musician, and Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore. The two proceeded to have one of the most stimulating, intellectually riveting conversations in history, exploring the age-old friction between science and religion. Science and the Indian Tradition: When Einstein Met Tagore (public library) recounts the historic encounter, amidst a broader discussion of the intellectual renaissance that swept India in the early twentieth century, germinating a curious osmosis of Indian traditions and secular Western scientific doctrine.

The following excerpt from one of Einstein and Tagore’s conversations dances between previously examined definitions of science, beauty, consciousness, and philosophy in a masterful meditation on the most fundamental questions of human existence.

EINSTEIN: Do you believe in the Divine as isolated from the world?

TAGORE: Not isolated. The infinite personality of Man comprehends the Universe. There cannot be anything that cannot be subsumed by the human personality, and this proves that the Truth of the Universe is human Truth.

I have taken a scientific fact to explain this — Matter is composed of protons and electrons, with gaps between them; but matter may seem to be solid. Similarly humanity is composed of individuals, yet they have their interconnection of human relationship, which gives living unity to man’s world. The entire universe is linked up with us in a similar manner, it is a human universe. I have pursued this thought through art, literature and the religious consciousness of man.

EINSTEIN: There are two different conceptions about the nature of the universe: (1) The world as a unity dependent on humanity. (2) The world as a reality independent of the human factor.

TAGORE: When our universe is in harmony with Man, the eternal, we know it as Truth, we feel it as beauty.

EINSTEIN: This is the purely human conception of the universe.

TAGORE: There can be no other conception. This world is a human world — the scientific view of it is also that of the scientific man. There is some standard of reason and enjoyment which gives it Truth, the standard of the Eternal Man whose experiences are through our experiences.

EINSTEIN: This is a realization of the human entity.

TAGORE: Yes, one eternal entity. We have to realize it through our emotions and activities. We realized the Supreme Man who has no individual limitations through our limitations. Science is concerned with that which is not confined to individuals; it is the impersonal human world of Truths. Religion realizes these Truths and links them up with our deeper needs; our individual consciousness of Truth gains universal significance. Religion applies values to Truth, and we know this Truth as good through our own harmony with it.

EINSTEIN: Truth, then, or Beauty is not independent of Man?

TAGORE: No.

EINSTEIN: If there would be no human beings any more, the Apollo of Belvedere would no longer be beautiful.

TAGORE: No.

EINSTEIN: I agree with regard to this conception of Beauty, but not with regard to Truth.

TAGORE: Why not? Truth is realized through man.

EINSTEIN: I cannot prove that my conception is right, but that is my religion.

TAGORE: Beauty is in the ideal of perfect harmony which is in the Universal Being; Truth the perfect comprehension of the Universal Mind. We individuals approach it through our own mistakes and blunders, through our accumulated experiences, through our illumined consciousness — how, otherwise, can we know Truth?

EINSTEIN: I cannot prove scientifically that Truth must be conceived as a Truth that is valid independent of humanity; but I believe it firmly. I believe, for instance, that the Pythagorean theorem in geometry states something that is approximately true, independent of the existence of man. Anyway, if there is a reality independent of man, there is also a Truth relative to this reality; and in the same way the negation of the first engenders a negation of the existence of the latter.

TAGORE: Truth, which is one with the Universal Being, must essentially be human, otherwise whatever we individuals realize as true can never be called truth – at least the Truth which is described as scientific and which only can be reached through the process of logic, in other words, by an organ of thoughts which is human. According to Indian Philosophy there is Brahman, the absolute Truth, which cannot be conceived by the isolation of the individual mind or described by words but can only be realized by completely merging the individual in its infinity. But such a Truth cannot belong to Science. The nature of Truth which we are discussing is an appearance – that is to say, what appears to be true to the human mind and therefore is human, and may be called maya or illusion.

EINSTEIN: So according to your conception, which may be the Indian conception, it is not the illusion of the individual, but of humanity as a whole.

TAGORE: The species also belongs to a unity, to humanity. Therefore the entire human mind realizes Truth; the Indian or the European mind meet in a common realization.

EINSTEIN: The word species is used in German for all human beings, as a matter of fact, even the apes and the frogs would belong to it.

TAGORE: In science we go through the discipline of eliminating the personal limitations of our individual minds and thus reach that comprehension of Truth which is in the mind of the Universal Man.

EINSTEIN: The problem begins whether Truth is independent of our consciousness.

TAGORE: What we call truth lies in the rational harmony between the subjective and objective aspects of reality, both of which belong to the super-personal man.

EINSTEIN: Even in our everyday life we feel compelled to ascribe a reality independent of man to the objects we use. We do this to connect the experiences of our senses in a reasonable way. For instance, if nobody is in this house, yet that table remains where it is.

TAGORE: Yes, it remains outside the individual mind, but not the universal mind. The table which I perceive is perceptible by the same kind of consciousness which I possess.

EINSTEIN: If nobody would be in the house the table would exist all the same — but this is already illegitimate from your point of view — because we cannot explain what it means that the table is there, independently of us.

Our natural point of view in regard to the existence of truth apart from humanity cannot be explained or proved, but it is a belief which nobody can lack — no primitive beings even. We attribute to Truth a super-human objectivity; it is indispensable for us, this reality which is independent of our existence and our experience and our mind — though we cannot say what it means.

TAGORE: Science has proved that the table as a solid object is an appearance and therefore that which the human mind perceives as a table would not exist if that mind were naught. At the same time it must be admitted that the fact, that the ultimate physical reality is nothing but a multitude of separate revolving centres of electric force, also belongs to the human mind.

In the apprehension of Truth there is an eternal conflict between the universal human mind and the same mind confined in the individual. The perpetual process of reconciliation is being carried on in our science, philosophy, in our ethics. In any case, if there be any Truth absolutely unrelated to humanity then for us it is absolutely non-existing.

It is not difficult to imagine a mind to which the sequence of things happens not in space but only in time like the sequence of notes in music. For such a mind such conception of reality is akin to the musical reality in which Pythagorean geometry can have no meaning. There is the reality of paper, infinitely different from the reality of literature. For the kind of mind possessed by the moth which eats that paper literature is absolutely non-existent, yet for Man’s mind literature has a greater value of Truth than the paper itself. In a similar manner if there be some Truth which has no sensuous or rational relation to the human mind, it will ever remain as nothing so long as we remain human beings.

EINSTEIN: Then I am more religious than you are!

TAGORE: My religion is in the reconciliation of the Super-personal Man, the universal human spirit, in my own individual being.

Source: https://www.brainpickings.org/2012/04/27/when-einstein-met-tagore/

Another picture of Rabindranath and Albert Einstein

Another picture of Rabindranath and Albert Einstein

 

Tomito Hara

Left - Tomito Hara, a successful Japanese silk merchant and an ardent art lover Right - Mukul Dey, Kiyo-san and Rabindrath Tagore at Tomitaro Hara’s Sankeien. August 1916 Photo: Mukul Dey Archives

Left – Tomito Hara, a successful Japanese silk merchant and an ardent art lover
Right – Mukul Dey, Kiyo-san and Rabindrath Tagore at Tomitaro Hara’s Sankeien. August 1916 – Photo: Mukul Dey Archives

Tomito Hara built a beautiful Japanese garden called Sankeien in Honmoku, Japan.

Tomito Hara built a beautiful Japanese garden called Sankeien in Honmoku, Japan.

Tomito Hara was a successful silk merchant in Japan who built a magnificent mansion and Japanese garden called Sankeien in Honmoku. Hara transported and reconstructed buildings of historic importance from Kamakura and Kyoto to this garden. The garden was opened to the public in 1906.

At the request of a famous Japanese painter, Yokoyama Taikan (1868 – 1958), Hara hosted Rabindranath and his three travelling companions, C.F. Andrews, William Pearson, and Mukul Dey, in his mansion from mid-June to August 1916. During this stay, Rabindranath developed an appreciation for traditional Japanese landscaping and architecture. Several unique houses in Santiniketan such as Udayan, Shyamali, Konarka, Udichi, Chitrabhanu, and Punashcha were the result of his stay in Sankeien. In addition, Rabindranath had a lily pond with an artificial island, weeping willows, and a Japanese lantern built in the backyard of his Uttarayan in Santiniketan.

Uttarayan in Santiniketan

Uttarayan in Santiniketan

 

Meetings with Other Famous Personalities and Leaders Around the World

Rabindranath met members of Iran's parliament. The image is from early 1930s in Tehran's Parliament. (Fabienkhan/ Wikimedia Commons)

Rabindranath met members of Iran’s parliament. The image is from early 1930s in Tehran’s Parliament. (Fabienkhan/ Wikimedia Commons)

Rabindranath met Helen Keller in 1930s

Rabindranath met Helen Keller in 1930s (click to enlarge)

Another picture of Rabindranath and Helen Keller

Another picture of Rabindranath and Helen Keller (click to enlarge)

Rabindranath with Ramananda Chattopadhyay and C.F. Andrews

Rabindranath with Ramananda Chattopadhyay and C.F. Andrews

Rabindranath with King Faisal of Iraq and King Ali of Hejaz

Rabindranath with King Faisal of Iraq and King Ali of Hejaz

Rabindranath with Maharaja Virchandra of Tripura

Rabindranath with Maharaja Virchandra of Tripura

Go to Later Life, Death, & Legacies >>

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Later Life and Death

Professor Tan Yun Shan presented Chinese Books to Rabindranath.

Professor Tan Yun Shan presented Chinese Books to Rabindranath.

Old age was not a deterrent for Rabindranath to continue his work. His last decade was filled with constructive works. He inaugurated two new departments at Visva Bharati: Cheena Bhavana or the Institute of Chinese Language and Culture in 1937, and Hindi Bhavana, or the Institute of Hindi Language in 1938.

The first Director of Cheena Bhavana was Professor Tan Yun Shan, whom Rabindranath had met during his visit to China, and had raised funds for the establishment of Cheena Bhavana. The Hindi Bhavana was funded by Hindi-speaking wealthy merchants, and Hazariprasad Dwivedi, the eminent Hindi litterateur, became the first director of Hindi Bhavana. Towards the end of Rabindranath’s life, Santiniketan had evolved into the centre of learning that attracted teachers and students from all over the world.

Rabindranath on his last birthday function

Rabindranath on his last birthday function

In the field of literature, Rabindranath published three novels, 15 volumes of poetry, dance dramas, reflective and critical essays, travelogues, and songs. He created dance dramas from his old poems such as Chitrangada, Shyama and Chandalika. He experimented with free verse in Punascha (1932), Sesh Saptak (1934), Patraput (1936), and Shyamali (1936).

As his last days approached, Rabindranath’s mind became restless. He could foresee a crisis in human civilisation. Japan had invaded China, and Russia dropped a bomb in Finland. His last message was published in the form of Crisis in Civilization (1941). Rabindranath became physically weak in the last years of his life. In September 1940, he fell ill during a visit to Kalimpong and he never fully recovered. On July 25, 1941, he was moved from Santiniketan to his childhood home of Jorasanko, where he passed away peacefully at the age of 80 on August 7, 1941.

Rabindranath in his bed in a railway compartment at Howrah Station (Calcutta) on November 22,1940.

Rabindranath in his bed in a railway compartment at Howrah Station (Calcutta) on November 22,1940.

The funeral procession of Rabindranath Tagore

The funeral procession of Rabindranath Tagore

 

Legacy

Tagore Residence Heritage Complex

Tagore Residence Heritage Complex

Today, almost 80 years after his death, Rabindranath’s legacy can be felt around the world. In Berlin, there is a street named after him, and busts resembling his likeness can be seen in notable places around the world. Many people are still inspired by his ideas of humanity and nationalism, and his writings have been reprinted countless times.

One of his most notable legacies is perhaps the university complex at Santiniketan that continues to produce many distinguished artists, writers, and humanitarians.

Visitors to Santiniketan can visit the Tagore Residence Heritage Complex (the five houses where Rabindranath would write, read or stay, depending on his mood). There is also a museum where various family objects are exhibited, including the replica of Rabindranath’s Nobel Prize (the original medal was stolen from the museum premise in 2004).

A sign by London County Council marking a property that Rabindranath had stayed in during his visit

A sign by London County Council marking a property that Rabindranath had stayed in during his visit

Rabindranath’s bust in Thakurova area of Prague, the Czech Republic

Rabindranath’s bust in Thakurova area of Prague, the Czech Republic

Rabindranath’s bust in the garden at Shakespeare’s birthplace

Rabindranath’s bust in the garden at Shakespeare’s birthplace

Monument to Rabindranath in Gordon Square next to University College London where he studied in 1879

Monument to Rabindranath in Gordon Square next to University College London where he studied in 1879

Rabindranath’s statue in Moscow, Russia

Rabindranath’s statue in Moscow, Russia

Left - A street named after Rabindranath in Berlin; Right – A lane named after Rabindranath Tagore in Tel Aviv, Israel

Left – A street named after Rabindranath in Berlin; Right – A lane named after Rabindranath Tagore in Tel Aviv, Israel

Rabin077

 

Rabindranath Tagore (1961, Documentary)
By Satyajit Ray


Or view the video on the server at:
https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/RabindranathDocumentary.mp4

 

Go to Download >>

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Selected Writings by Rabindranath Tagore for Download

Chitra (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Creative Unity (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Fruit-Gathering (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Gitanjali (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Glimpses of Bengal (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Mashi and Other Stories (click on the image to download in PDF form)

My Reminiscences (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Nationalism (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Selected Short Stories (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Sadhana (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Songs of Kabir (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Stories from Tagore (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Stray Birds (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Crescent Moon (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Cycle of Spring (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Fugitive (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Gardener (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Home and the World (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Hungry Stones and Other Stories (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The King of the Dark Chamber (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Post Office (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The Spirit of Japan (click on the image to download in PDF form)

Poems (click on the image to download in PDF form)

The texts above were sourced from legitimate book-hosting services offering these texts for free download. They are made available here for purely educational, non-commercial purposes.

 

Go to Painting Gallery >>

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Selected Paintings by Rabindranath

Bird Fantastic - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Bird Fantastic – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Brooding - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Brooding – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Face – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Figure - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Figure – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Head Study - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Head Study – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Head Study - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Head Study – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Man and Woman - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Man and Woman – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Seven Figures - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Seven Figures – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

On Being

On Being

Standing Figure - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Standing Figure – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Study in Face - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Study in Face – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Landscape

Landscape

Two Figures - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Two Figures – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Two Figures - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Two Figures – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Vase - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Vase – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Veiled Woman - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Veiled Woman – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Woman - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Woman – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Woman Face - National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

Woman Face – National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi

 

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Known Published Works of Rabindranath Tagore in English

  • The Beggar Woman or The Beggar Girl
  • The Tale of the Poet
  • Letters from an expatriate in Europe, Letters of a sojourner in Europe, Letters of a visitor to Europe, Letters of an exile in Europe
  • The Flower of the Woods
  • The Genius of Valmiki
  • Music and Feeling
  • The Broken Heart
  • Evening Songs
  • Morning Songs
  • The Fatal Hunt
  • The Young Queen’s Market
  • Miscellaneous Topics
  • Nature’s Revenge
  • The Songs of Bhanushingho Thakur
  • Poems of Childhood
  • Pictures and Songs
  • The Shadow of the Sun
  • Discussions
  • A pamphlet on Ram Mohan Roy
  • Sharps and Flats
  • The River Stairs or The Ghat’s Story
  • The Royal Sage
  • Reviews
  • The Play of Illusions
  • King and Queen
  • Sacrifice
  • The Heart’s Desire or Mental Images
  • Lecture on Lord Cross’s India Bill
  • Diary of a traveller to Europe
  • The Rift or The Divide
  • Exercise-book, The Copybook, The Notebook
  • The Matronly Boy or The Housewife
  • Little Master’s Return, Return of the Little Master, The Return of Khokababu, The Child’s Return [stories 4), or My Lord, the Baby[Stories 5]
  • The Postmaster
  • The Matrimonial Deal, Profit and Loss, Debts and Dues
  • Taraprasanna’s Achievement, Taraprasanna’s Fame, Taraprasanna’s Masterpiece
  • A Bequest of Property, Wealth Surrendered, The Trust Property
  • Dalia
  • A Tale of Fantasy, A Fanciful Story, An Absurd Story, The Kingdom of Cards[Stories 5]
  • The Golden Deer, Fool’s Gold, The Golden Mirage, The Fugitive Gold
  • The Pedlar from Kabul, Kabuliwallah, Kabuliwala, Kabuli, The Fruitseller
  • The Living and the Dead, Alive and Dead, Living or Dead?
  • A Single Night, The Supreme Night, One Night
  • The Skeleton, A Study in Anatomy
  • The Victory
  • The Silent Girl, Subha, The Dumb Girl
  • The Renunciation, Outcast, Sacrifice
  • Holiday, The School Closes, The Home-Coming
  • Wrong at the Start
  • Emancipation
  • Diary of a traveller to Europe
  • The Englishmen and the Indians
  • The Ending, The Conclusion
  • The Editor
  • A Problem Solved, The Solution of the Problem, The Riddle Solved
  • Punishment or The Sentence
  • Once there was a King
  • Reciprocation
  • Gift and Return
  • The Intervening Woman, The Girl Between, or The In-between Girl
  • Collection of songs incorporating Valmiki Pratibha
  • Forbidden Entry, Trespass, The Trespass
  • At Dead of Night, In the Middle of the Night, or At Midnight, In the Night
  • Judge
  • Atonement
  • Farewell Curse
  • The Golden Boat
  • Hungry Stones, Hungry Stone, The Hunger of Stones, The Hungry Stones, or The Spirit of the Marble Palace
  • Elder Sister, The Elder Sister
  • Resentment Appeased, Fury Appeased, Appeasement, Giribala
  • The Visitor, Visitor, Guest, The Guest, The Wandering Guest, or The Runaway
  • Grandfather, Thakurda, The Babus of Nayanjore
  • Nuisance, The Nuisance, Unwanted, The Troublemaker, or The Castaway
  • Wish-fulfilment, Wishes Granted
  • Malini
  • River
  • Five Elements
  • Manuscripts of Baikuntha
  • The Trial
  • Professor
  • The Detective
  • Woman Bereft of Jewels, The Lost Jewels, or Missing My Bejeweled
  • Forlorn Hope, False Hope, False Hopes, A Shattered Dream
  • The Royal Mark[7]
  • Royal Mark, The Raj Seal, or We Crown Thee King
  • Fertility Sacrifice or Son-sacrifice
  • The Gift of Sight or The Gift of Vision
  • A collection of short poems and epigrams
  • The Auspicious Vision
  • Raja and Rani
  • Saved
  • Folly, Thoughtlessness or A Lapse of Judgement
  • Failure, Fail, F is for Fail
  • My Fair Neighbour
  • Tales
  • The Fleeting One
  • Imagination
  • Stories
  • A religious essay – Brahma Upanishad
  • A religious essay – Aupanishad Brahma
  • A religious essay – Brahma-mantra
  • The Broken Nest
  • A Grain of Sand, Speck in the Eye, Eye Sore
  • Offerings
  • List of Bengali verbs
  • Child
  • Hero
  • Pride Surrendered
  • Nemesis
  • The Bachelor’s Club
  • My Golden Bengal
  • If no one responds to your call, then go your own way alone
  • Collection of political essays and lectures
  • The Wreck, Ship Wreck, Boat Accident
  • Ferry
  • India (collection of political essays and lectures)
  • Political essay – Deshnayak
  • Political essay – Rajbhakti
  • Hidden Treasure, The Hidden Treasure, Buried Treasure
  • Master Mashai or Mr. Teacher
  • Literature
  • Ancient Literature
  • Modern Literature
  • Literature of the People
  • Tributes to Great Lives
  • The King and his Subjects (collection of political essays)
  • Collection of political essays
  • My Country (collection of political and sociological essays)
  • Society
  • Ends and Means
  • Autumn Festival
  • The Crown
  • Two essays on Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar printed before in Charitrapuja
  • On Bengali philology
  • Penance
  • An anthology of poems
  • Fair-Faced
  • Rasmani’s Son, Rashmoni’s Son, or The Son of Rashmani
  • The King of the Dark Chamber
  • Where the Mind is Without Fear
  • Dispenser of the Destiny of India
  • My Reminiscences
  • The Post Office
  • The Immovable
  • Gitanjali (Song Offerings)
  • Glimpses of Bengal
  • Torn Leaves
  • Sadhana: The Realisation of Life
  • The Gardener
  • The Crescent Moon
  • Chitra (translation of Chitrangada)
  • A Garland of Songs
  • Dedication
  • The Devotee, The Baishnav Woman
  • Haimanti: Of Autumn
  • Last Night,or Mashi
  • A Wife’s Letter or The Wife’s Letter
  • Songs of Kabir
  • Ten volumes
  • Selection for the use of students
  • The Inscrutable Woman, The Unknown Woman, or Woman Unknown
  • The Flight of Cranes, A Flight of Swans, Wild Geese, or The Swan
  • Fruit-Gathering
  • Stray Birds (325 epigrams)
  • Chaturanga, Quartet, or Broken Ties
  • The Home and the World
  • Cycle of Spring
  • The Spirit of Japan
  • In Quest of a Bride or Bride and Bridegroom
  • The Austere Woman or The Austere Wife
  • As the Master Wills
  • Personality (lectures delivered in America)
  • The Parrot’s Training
  • The Trial of the Horse
  • Old Man’s Ghost
  • The Runaway (stories in verse)
  • Crossing (poetry from Naivedya, Kheya, Gitanjali, Gitimalya and Gitali)
  • Lover’s Gift[Poetry 7] (from Naivedya, Kheya, Gitanjali, Gitimalya and Gitali)
  • Stage version of Achalayatan
  • Nationalism (in the West, Japan and India)
  • The Centre of Indian Culture
  • Travel in Japan
  • House Number One
  • Stage version of Raja
  • Stage version of Saradotsav
  • New Doll
  • The Wrong Heaven
  • Fugitive
  • Thought Relics (short meditative texts)
  • Greater India (four lectures 1902-1908)
  • Meeting of Cultures
  • Call of Truth
  • Rain Festival
  • Welcome to the Rains
  • Letter
  • The Waterfall
  • Creative Unity
  • Spring
  • Red Oleanders (or Blood Oleanders)
  • The Cult of the Charkha
  • The Last Shower
  • Fireflies or Autographs
  • All Square
  • Stage version of Prajapatir Nirbandha
  • The Dancing Girl’s Worship
  • The King of Dance
  • The Play of the Seasons
  • Stage version of Goray Galad (The Last-Ditch Dave or Saved at Last)
  • Letters from Java
  • The Patriot, Purification, or Ritual and Reform
  • Nature’s Child, Balai, or Bolai
  • On the anniversary of Sriniketan
  • The Artist
  • Relationships, Crosscurrents, or Nexus
  • Farewell Song, Farewell, My Friend, The Last Poem
  • Stage version of Prayaschitta
  • Sheaves
  • Traveller
  • The Philosophy of Leisure
  • The Religion of Man
  • Garden of Songs
  • Letters from Russia
  • Journey to Persia
  • The Dancing Girl’s Worship
  • Man the Artist
  • The Stolen Treasure
  • Land of Cards (based on the 1892 short story Ekti Ashare Golpo)
  • Kingdom of Cards
  • The Flute
  • The Untouchable Woman
  • Two Sisters
  • The Garden[
  • The Arbour
  • Four Chapters
  • Avenue
  • Essays on Bengali prosody
  • Article on modern astronomy
  • The Smiling One
  • The Newly Born
  • The Pipe
  • My Boyhood Days
  • The Laboratory or Laboratory
  • Sunday
  • The Epilogue or The Final Word
  • From the Sick Bed
  • Recovery
  • Ill-repute
  • The Story of a Mussalmani or The Story of a Muslim Woman
  • Great News
  • Garden of Songs
  • Crisis in Civilization
  • Birthday
  • Last Writings
  • The Ascetic
  • Autumn-Festival
  • King and Rebel
  • Talks in China
  • Vision
  • The Haldar Family
  • Feast for Rats
  • Jajneshwar’s Offering
  • Mahamaya
  • The Wedding Garland, The Garlanding, or Exchange of Garlands
  • Master Ji or Master Zi
  • Cloud and Sunshine or Clouds and Sunshine
  • Means of Freedom
  • An Unapproved Story, The Unapproved Story, or The Rejected Story
  • Throttling Progress
  • Retaliation or Revenge
  • Ramkanai’s Folly
  • Yagneswar’s Ceremony
  • Finally
  • Inheritance
  • The Middle One

 

Collections of Short Stories

  • Collection of fifteen short stories
  • Collection of four short stories
  • Collection of ten short stories
  • Lores and Legends
  • A Bouquet of Stories
  • Stories (part II of Galpoguchha)
  • Collection of eight short stories
  • Collection of four short stories
  • Glimpses of Bengal. Includes 13 stories: The Fruit-Seller, The School Closes, A Resolve Accomplished, The Dumb Girl, The Wandering Guest, The Look Auspicious, A Study in Anatomy, The Landing Stairway, The Sentence, The Expiation, The Golden Mirage, The Trespass, The Hungry Stone.
  • The Hungry Stones and other stories. Includes 13 stories: The Hungry Stones, The Victory, Once There Was a King, The Home-Coming, My Lord, The Baby, The Kingdom of Cards, The Devotee, Vision, The Babus of Nayanjore, Living or Dead?, “We Crown Thee King”, The Renunciation, The Cabuliwallah)
  • Mashi and Other Stories. Includes 14 stories: Mashi, The Skeleton, The Auspicious Vision, The Supreme Night, Raja and Rani, The Trust Property, The Riddle solved, The Elder Sister, Subha, The Postmaster, The River Stairs, The Castaway, Saved, My Fair Neighbour.
  • Stories from Tagore. Includes 10 stories: The Cabuliwallah, The Home-Coming, Once there was a King, The Child’s Return, Master Mashai, Subha, The Postmaster, The Castaway, The Son of Rashmani, The Babus of Nayanjore.
  • Broken Ties and Other Stories. Includes the novel Broken Ties (Chaturanga) and 6 stories: In the Night, The Fugitive Gold, The Editor, Giribala, The Lost Jewels, Emancipation.
  • He
  • Three Stories (Laboratory, Rabibar, Shesh Katha)
  • The Parrot’s Training and Other Stories Includes 4 stories The Parrot’s Training, The Trial of the Horse, Old Man’s Ghost, Great News.
  • The Runaway and Other Stories.[18] Translated by Somnath Maitra.
  • The Housewarming and Other Selected Writings. Translated by Mary Lago, Amiya Chakravarty and Tarun Gupta.
  • Selected Short Stories. Translated by William Radice; includes 30 stories from the 1890’s: The Living and the Dead, The Postmaster, Profit and Loss, Housewife, Little Master’s Return, The Divide, Taraprasanna’s Fame, Wealth Surrendered, Skeleton, A Single Night, Fool’s Gold, Holiday, Kabuliwallah, The Editor, Punishment, A Problem Solved, Exercise-Book, Forbidden Entry, In the Middle of the Night, Unwanted, Elder Sister, Fury Appeased, Thakurda, Guest, Wishes Granted, False Hope, Son-sacrifice, The Hungry Stones, Thoughtlessness, The Gift of Sight.
  • Selected Stories[11] Translated by Krishna Dutta and Mary Lago; includes 14 stories: The Girl Between, The Broken Nest, The Atonement, The Punishment, The Notebook, The Postmaster, The Return of Khokababu, The Conclusion, The Nuisance, A Lapse of Judgment, Rashmoni’s Son, The Austere Wife, Bride and Bridegroom, The Rejected Story.
  • The Hidden Treasure & Other Stories[17] Includes 8 stories: The Hidden Treasure, Cloud and Sun, Mahamaya, The Conclusion, The Parrot’s Training, The Trial of the Horse, Old Man’s Ghost and Great News.
  • Selected Short Stories.[8] Various translators; ed. Sukanta Chaudhuri; includes 26 stories: The Ghat’s Story, Ramkanai’s Folly, The Exercise-Book, Inheritance, A Single Night, A Fanciful Story, The Living and the Dead, The Golden Deer, Kabuliwala, Subha, Punishment, Trespass, Grandfather, Hungry Stone, The Visitor, The Royal Mark, Folly, The Wedding Garland, The Haldar Family, The Wife’s Letter, Woman Unknown, House Number One, The Unapproved Story, Balai, The Laboratory, The Story of a Mussalmani.
  • Galpaguchchha Volume 1: The Postmaster, Return of the Little Master, Chhuti, the Visitor, The Exercise Book, The Pedlar from Kabul, The Living and the Dead, The Golden Deer, A Bequest of Property, Trespass, Punishment, Means of Freedom, The Austere Woman, The Silent Girl, A Single Night, Jajneshwar’s Offering, Taraprasanna’s Achievement, A Tale of Fantasy, Forlorn Hope, Broken Nest.
  • Galpaguchchha Volume 2: Cloud and Sunshine, The Ghat’s Story, The Matrimonial Deal, Ramkanai’s Folly, Grandfather, Nuisance, The Matronly Boy, The Skeleton, Folly, Wish-fulfilment, The Rift, Reciprocation, Retaliation, Resentment Appeased, The Wedding Garland, The Intervening Woman, The Haldar Family, Rasmani’s Son, Fertility Sacrifice, Nature’s Child, Woman Bereft of Jewels, The Ending.
  • Galpaguchchha Volume 3: Hungry Stones, Hidden Treasure, The Editor, The Gift of Sight, Elder Sister, At Dead of Night, A Problem Solved, Atonement, The Inscrutable Woman, The Royal Mark, The Wife’s Letter, An Unapproved Story, House Number One, In Quest of a Bride, The Laboratory, Throttling Progress, Sunday, The Story of a Muslim Woman, The Epilogue.

 

Sources:

  • Dr. S. Radhakrishnan, Rabindranath Tagore: A Centenary, Volumes 1861-1961. Sahitya Akademi, 1992, http://books.google.com
  • https://happinesshomeandhealth.wordpress.com/2016/01/13/santiniketan-the-soul-of-rabindranath-tagore/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorasanko_Thakur_Bari
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debendranath_Tagore
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jyotirindranath_Tagore
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kadambari_Devi
  • https://www.telegraphindia.com/1130915/jsp/7days/17345231.jsp
  • https://www.scienceandnonduality.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/einstein_tagore.pdf
  • https://www.scienceandnonduality.com/the-historic-einstein-tagore-meeting-is-truth-independent-of-us/
  • http://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/literature-mythologising-a-mysticw-b-yeats-on-the-poetry-of-rabindranath-tagore/
  • http://www.chitralekha.org/articles/tomitaro-hara/remembering-tomitaro-hara
  • https://what-buddha-said.net/library/Leaves/bl010.pdf
  • http://www.merepix.com/2013/01/rabindranath-tagore-rare-photos.html
  • https://www.parabaas.com/rabindranath/articles/pMartin1.html
  • http://www.online-literature.com/tagore-rabindranath/4393/
  • http://www.bengalspider.com/resources/3144-Rabindranath-Tagore-Awards-Achievements-Honors.aspx
  • https://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/rabindranath-tagore-42.php
  • https://www.britannica.com/biography/Rabindranath-Tagore
  • https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/rabindranath-tagore
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabindra_Sangeet
  • http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/r/rabindranath-tagore-poet-and-painter/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_by_Rabindranath_Tagore
  • http://creative.sulekha.com/a-tagore-poem-on-lord-buddha_88400_blog
  • http://tagoreweb.in/Render/ShowContent.aspx?ct=Verses&bi=72EE92F5-BE50-40C7-5E6E-0F7410664DA3&ti=72EE92F5-BE50-4A27-9E6E-0F7410664DA3

 

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26 Responses to Rabindranath Tagore: A beacon for humanity

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  1. Yee Yin on Nov 16, 2019 at 1:46 pm

    There are many great men in India that we are not so familiar with, Mr. Rabindranath Tagore is one of them. He understood how important education to grow good leaders for the country. He also knew that report card is not everything but it is more important to educate the children about creativity and responsibility. Mr Rabindranath Tagore was very selfish, he believed strongly in his passion and he did everything he could to materialise his idea. He had a great care and passion for humanity, fame to him was not important at all.

  2. nicholas on Oct 30, 2019 at 2:30 pm

    It is said, if you wish to continue to live even after death, it is possible through your work. Through the ideas, thoughts, and books, literature has given us many such immortal legends. Decades after they moved on to their heavenly abode, these legends continue to inspire us through their stories, novels, poems and other literary work.

    India has given the world many such authors. Probably, Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore will rank among the top five authors whose works are so good; many of them are relevant even today. We celebrate his birth anniversary on the 7th of May and this is a tribute to this great Noble award-winning artist.

    Tagore was not just an author who wrote books, he wrote songs, was a passionate painter and sketcher. Right from the age of 8, he had started writing poems and moved on to short stories followed by novels and other texts as well as songs. It is worth a mention here that he has written three national anthems (India, Bangladesh, and Sri-Lanka)

    Below are the list of top 5 most popular works that Rabindranath Tagore created in the field of literature.

    1) Gitanjali

    Without any doubt, the collection of 157 poems on various topics such as spirituality to real-life complexities is his best and most famous work. No wonder then that it won him the Nobel Prize for literature in 1913.

    2) Gitabitan

    Tagore wrote more than 2000 songs. They are collectively known as Rabindra Sangeet and are available together as a collection in his works called Gitabitan. The true connoisseurs of Bengali music relish these and it is often heard in traditionally Bengali households today as much as it was played decades ago.

    3) Choker Bali

    His novel, literally translated as ‘A grain of sand’ is a story that takes the readers through a complex journey of human relationships depicting honesty, passion, and desires around an extra-marital affair. The novel also got its due respect in the form of a feature-length movie of the same name.

    4) Gora

    This is Tagore’s longest of the novels he wrote. The issues and topics raised in this are relevant even today though they focus on different social standards in colonial India.

    5) Kabuliwala

    This is a literary classic which captured the attention of the film industry, Bengali as well as Hindi. This is a story about a vendor from Kabul, Afghanistan who is trying to adjust to the hardships of life in Calcutta (Kolkata) and his emotional attachment to the five-year-old daughter of the narrator. Reading the Kabuliwala is sure to leave you heavy and emotional.

    Reading great literature and trying to implement the lessons into our lives is a way we can pay our tributes to these legends.

  3. Pastor Antoinette on Oct 28, 2017 at 5:56 pm

    Rabindranath Tagore is for a sure a beacon for humanity! His many talents such as poetry, writing, painting and much more, have inspired many people and his works are still well-known. I am inspired to read some works from Rabindranath Tagore as he wrote many short stories which are for sure worthwhile to read.

    Thank you for sharing about inspiring people always!

  4. Valentina Suhendra on Oct 19, 2017 at 9:31 pm

    Dear friends,

    This meme is powerful. Who you hang around with and the types of attitude they have is who you will be influenced by many times and who you will become in the future. Look at your friends and the people that always surround you to know who you will become.

    Tsem Rinpoche

    d96b47a2-387a-4d07-8ae1-6b4ad910aed2

  5. wan wai meng on Oct 6, 2017 at 1:29 am

    I studied at one of the ‘branded’ schools of Ipoh, it is called the Anglo Chinese School, and we had our sports team delineated by various names, there was Tagore, Abdul Aziz, Horley, Eu Tong Sen and Oldham then a smart alec Head master decided to break with tradition and removed all these sport houses.

    I knew Reverend as the pioneer of Methodist faith in Malaya, Eu Tong Sen was a famous Chinese miner, I didn’t know much about Abdul Aziz, Tagore and Oldham. I was in the Tagore house for quite some years, but without the internet I did not find out much about who Tagore was. It is interesting that Tagore this spiritual man found is way to a former missionary school in Ipoh.

    Of all the qualities of Tagore I felt his role as an educator is impressive, I wonder if there is modern day Tagore, such a person could make such an impact on the world’s education. yes he advocated teaching outside the classroom, that people should learn not surrounded by the 4 walls.

  6. Yau Mun on Oct 2, 2017 at 12:31 am

    Rabindranath is highly attained, his wisdom is comparable with a lot of high lamas or spiritual teacher. Reading his biography is really inspiring, during his time is not easy to travel, I am not able to imagine the time that he spend on travelling. It showed how comparison he was traveling all over the world to teach.

    I have been hearing a lot of Mahatma Gandhi, now I know who his great teacher was.

    Rabindranath was granted a knighthood by King George V in 1915, he renounced his knighthood in protest of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre in 1919, during which a crowd of non-violent protesters and Sikh pilgrims were brutally fired upon by the British Indian Army. This really amazed me and show how he was not attached to fame and honor.

    Rabindranath meeting with Albert Einstein, their discussion was so profound. It took me a few round of reading before can get some of the meaning of their discussion. The discussion of existence and spiritually.

    His achievement in one life time is amazing…

  7. Jennifer Yuen on Oct 1, 2017 at 9:58 pm

    Thanks for the article Rinpoche. Rabindranath’s life story is inspiring. He had achieved so much in his life in many different areas. Even when he was at the lowest point in his life with many of his loved ones passing away, he continued to care for others. Though not much was written about him and Buddhism, but his poems spoke it all. He had such deep understanding and realisation of Buddha’s teaching. His conversation with the great scientist Albert Einstein revealed his understanding of the fundamental truth of existence and consciousness. He really was an exceptional person. I would like to get a copy of Rabindranath’s Gitanjali and read ?

  8. Samfoonheei on Sep 30, 2017 at 10:23 pm

    Interesting …. Rabindranath Tagore wrote his first poem at the tender age of eight!. He was someone who was jacks of all trades. Rabindranath Tagore, a great Indian poet and writer and was one of the most revered literary figures in Indian history. He was the most admired Indian writer who introduced India’s rich cultural heritage to the West. Amazingly due to his achievement he ws awarded for his work and became the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913.. RabindranathTagore has since influenced a whole generation of writers. His impact is far beyond many countries and his works have been translated to many languages including English, Dutch, German, Spanish and so forth. Thank you Rinpoche for sharing these interesting and inspiring article .

  9. Pastor David Lai on Sep 28, 2017 at 10:20 pm

    Wow! What a great poet and philosopher! I enjoyed reading about his life and his incredible ability in writing and eloquence. He is quite the renaissance man in terms of writing, poetry and so forth. He was indeed prolific with his voluminous output and its just amazing and it makes me wonder where does he find the inspiration for his incredible body of written works.

    From this article I can see that a lot of what he writes is his commentary on social issues prevalent in British India at that time. I felt proud that he made it big in Europe at a time when India was merely a colony of the British Empire. I can see that he has a way of endearing himself with the literati of Europe and makes good use of his fame to spread a cultural message about India to the West. It gives a whole new dimension of eastern civilisation to a skewed view of Westerners.

    In a way, I am glad that today as a lasting legacy of British India occupation, a sizeable population of South Asians are slowly overwhelming the population. Its a kind of a poetic justice for India to reverse the colonization of England. It would be neat to see an Indian PM and perhaps an Indian member of the royal family.

  10. Esther Goh on Sep 27, 2017 at 12:34 pm

    Rabindranath Tagore, a name that had left a legacy that people will never forget. A multi talented man who had inspired and touched so many hearts through his great works and sacrifices. He also reminded me of the qualities that Rinpoche possesses, selfless, wise and kind besides being talented. A great article to inspire us to follow our passion and never to give up even if we are faced with a lot of difficulties.

  11. Pastor Chia on Sep 27, 2017 at 8:46 am

    Rabinranath Tagore extraordinary multi talents inteligent person i never know until i reading through this article.What he can acheive and his determination brought him great knowledge to understand what people need and willing to help people who are suffering. He can talk to all level people in the world and connect with them and share knowledge with humanity. I hope more leader in the world can inspire by him and bring harmony, humanity world people to the world.

  12. June Kang on Sep 27, 2017 at 8:29 am

    Rabindranath Tagore has shown us that there is no limit of our capability. He has achieved so much in one lifetime. His work was not only quantitative but also very much qualitative. He inspired me is not because he was the first Non- European to win the Noble Prize but is his profound thinking on human welfare which has been reflected in every corner of his lifelong. I read some of his book and feel that you can always relate your life with his writings. Thank you for sharing this article.

  13. Mingwen on Sep 27, 2017 at 7:27 am

    Such a great century that individuals who have make use their lives and make great impacts on the world have been borned. Rabindranath Tagor, Alber Einstein and Mahatma Gandhi, 3 great hero have met ! They have different contributions to the world but they equipped the same components of to be success, which ‘re passion, determination and positive motivations.

    Nothing is impossible, it’s just difficult. ?️

  14. Tek Lee on Sep 27, 2017 at 2:35 am

    Rabindranath Tagore was truly a man of everything. He touched everyone in every field, from his song, his poem, his books, his play, his teachings etc. He was the man that able to communicate with people from different level and different background. What more can I use to describe him?
    Like everybody said, which I am also thinking the same, he really remind me of Rinpoche while I was reading this article. A man with great wisdom and great compassion, who can touch and reach every individual from different angle and different ways. For example, we can get information of all sources from Rinpoche’s blog. We’ve seen and experienced how Rinpoche gave teaching which can reach one from various direction, various ways, yet very logical. It strikes my mind, was he a reincarnation of a great being too?
    Another thing from the article that strike me was, arranged marriage. Even the great Rabindranath Tagore also couldn’t escape from this. Even his father who was rich and well educated followed this “tradition”. As far as I know in this modern age, some countries and even some families in our country still carry this “tradition”. One of my Indian friends nearly became the “victim” of arrange marriage.
    In conclusion, a great man whose name is remembered until now, because of Indian National Anthem and Bangladesh National Anthem. Maybe people don’t always hear about his name now, but people who knows Mahatma Gandhi and Albert Einstein will know about him, Rabindranath Tagore.

  15. Justin Cheah on Sep 27, 2017 at 1:20 am

    What a great master we are reading of. I likened hi with the quality of our Rinpoche possesses. Always creative and a very fast learner and multi talented. This is what I gathered when i was reading more and more into the article. He uses creative ways of teaching and we just have to read up the list of people he actually rubbed shoulders with and the successful people he taught before. His passion lies into teaching and his perseverance and tenacity is for all to see, selling off his property just to continue funding his passion to teach. Inspiring person, just like our Rinpoche. Thank You Rinpoche for leading the way showing what ingredients are required for one to be successful.

  16. Vivian Ong on Sep 27, 2017 at 12:52 am

    Rabindranath is such a skilled and capable person.

    He learned Sanskrit, English, Bengali, Geometry, Physics, History, Arithmetic, Physiology, Geography and Anatomy. He was also trained in gymnastics and wrestling.

    It is amazing that at the age of 8 he already wrote his first poem.

    It is admirable that his family was one of the first Indian industrialists and entrepreneurs in the early days.

    I notice Rabindranath is not the bookworm type of person. Instead he is more of an arts person.

    Rabindranath is such a simple and kind person. He also explores new ideas and encourage people to do so and not be afraid to explore. He is the kind of person who will express what he see and feel in his poems and writings for eg the poor, the rich, poverty, sufferings. All these not many will take time to notice.

    His works is so famous that even the illiterate sing his songs. So, you can see that he is able to touch the lives of the people. His works also reaches until the Western countries.

    Although he himself was down with personal tragedies like his loved ones passed away but he still put others before him. For example the tragedy that happen in India whereby the British Indian Army killed some of the protestors, Rabindranath chose to give up the knighthood title that was conferred to him by King George V.

    Rabindranath also has affinity with Buddhism and he strongly respect Lord Buddha for his qualities.

  17. Pastor Albert on Sep 27, 2017 at 12:41 am

    Rabindranath, a man who is beyond intelligent and his wisdom is comparable with the many noble and high lamas, reading his bio is really inspiring, he travel around the world and he is able to benefit every people he met, he dislike classroom education but he has tremendous knowledge to speak to all the people at different level, and many more that he has done in his life, he does not has an easy life but he never give up whenever he face obstacles. Rabindranath has used his life to teach us about consistency and never give up, as long as we persist on doing what we believe, we will gain great achievement.

  18. Julia Tan on Sep 27, 2017 at 12:15 am

    A boy that doesn’t like to go to school turned out to be a wise man who influenced the world with his humanity philosophy. He loves life. He saw the important of art which connected each other. He promoted harmony and peace. He predicted the downfall of civilisation. He went all the way to promote what he believed. People who listened to his talk and read about his books or peoms became his followers. He worked very hard, he’s every where. The war made broke his heart but never harden. He continued to influence others until his last breath.

    Ravindranath reminded me of Rinpoche, wise and compassionate. Selfless and determine. Working hard for the welfare of all beings. Promote peace and freedom every where restlessly. Followers all over the world.

    I enjoy reading this article very much. A man who can achieved so much in one life time due to his believe.

  19. Andrea Lai on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:52 pm

    Mr. Rabindranath is a very spiritual type of person and his passion on helping educate people into better life really inspired me. Though he not really into religion understanding, his determination on achieving his goal was far beyond and his nature habit of exploring other countries gain him more knowledge that could benefit others. He is superb, intuitive, creative and smart. His great work of Dharma by established schools, institution, university, arts and agriculture with only purposed to encourage more people into education. His philosophy is by education, people will gain more knowledge to survive themselves.

  20. Pastor Henry Ooi on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:46 pm

    I find Rabindranath a very intelligent and a spiritual man, and he is such an inspiration for aspiring talents to pursue what they wanted regardless of what their parents wanted them to do and to become. Coupled with his tenacious passion for the arts, he worked relentlessly to achieve his ambition resulting in a legacy that left present day artists to emulate. His career life shines like a beacon for other aspirants to follow, to go all the way and never to give up regardless of personal hardships, financial and physical obstacles.

  21. pammie yap on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:38 pm

    Truly an inspirational man who is also intelligent, spiritual and talented! He spoke up when others would not and the best part is, he didn’t do all those things without knowledge, he did it with profound wisdom. He could tap into any subjects and ‘win’ the other person’s respect and admiration.
    And all these reminded me of our Rinpoche, who is also super talented in many ways, knowledgeable, spoke up and stood on His ground, full of wisdom and he knows how to ‘win’ the other person. One can see from Rinpoche’s various blog posts with different topics to choose from, no matter what was written, Rinpoche could always tap into our mind and make us learn and think further.

  22. nicholas on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:27 pm

    Rabindranath Tagore is a creative and highly intelligent person. I strongly admire his courage and his passion. He struggled and despite all the personally tragedy he continue his venture to provide education to others with great determination and he became a legend which many people remembered him and his legacy continue up to now.

    Rabindranath admiration for Lord Buddha Shakyamuni and the Buddhist doctrines made him introduced Buddhism as a special course of study for the students of Santiniketan.

    He also inspired me that at the age of 60s he took up painting and produced works that won him a place among India’s foremost contemporary artists. Learning never determined by age but by our passion & determination.

  23. Eric kksiow on Sep 26, 2017 at 11:03 pm

    After read about this article and my opinions regarding of Rabindranath Tagore :

    He’s a talented man in many ways ( A prolific writer, poet, songwriter, playwright, actor, and painter, he revolutionised Indian art and literature, and was also a pioneer of the Bengal Renaissance Movement. ) and Rabindranath Tagore fully used all of his talented
    ways to bring people into spiritual practices.

    He wrote a very good quotes that’s i read it from above and it’s touched my heart :
    The Grasp of your Hand

    Let me not pray to be sheltered from dangers, but to be fearless in facing them.
    Let me not beg for the stilling of my pain, but for the heart to conquer it.
    Let me not crave in anxious fear to be saved, but hope for the patience to win my freedom.

    Grant me that I may not be a coward, feeling your mercy in my success alone; but let me find the grasp of Your hand in my failure.

    – Rabindranath Tagore

    ————————————————————————————————————————
    A very passion-ed guy hwo never give up his own path to bring peoples into spiritual path.
    Salute and respect
    Eric kksiow

  24. Stella Cheang on Sep 23, 2017 at 10:58 pm

    Rabindranath Tagore is an extraordinary individual. He expounds humanity through the many arts, literature, drama, songs, education and etc. I believe it is his sensitive and sentimental nature that gives rise to his many creative writings and artwork. However, he is also determined in his approach, as we can see how he ensures that his drama get executed to the dot, and this approach in politics.

    Rabindranath Tagore is well respected around the world. It can be seen by him being a Nobel award winner, and having monument, bust, street names and marking of him in Moscow, Prague London, Berlin and the birth place of Shakespeare. He is the only non-European who is without contemperory when it comes to art and culture during that era.

    Thank you, Rinpoche, for this sharing.

  25. Datuk May on Sep 20, 2017 at 3:36 pm

    It is mind blowing to read about the life and legacy of Rabindranath Tagore. Rabindranath had such an expansive and international OPEN mind whereby he was able to absorb so much about humanity and the need and circumstances for humanity to grow and realise the truth.

    His embrace of Buddhism was because his thoughts about life and the unlimitedness of the mind is so similar to what the Buddha taught.

    Rabindranath was so talented that not only was he accorded many awards including the Noble Prize for literature (the first Indian and non westerner) it was his ability to appreciate differences in culture and tradition that made him such a well respected human being.

    He is truly a beacon for humanity and it is joyful to read and have acknowledge of such a great human being.

  26. Anne Ong on Sep 19, 2017 at 9:55 pm

    Very impressed and truly inspired about Rabindranath Tagore. I have been curiously waiting for this article to be published since Rinpoche tweeted about it on May, 22. I was very interested to know what is so special about this man? True enough he is a multi talented man and his story is very inspiring. He can learn and do so many things in the olden days. And his paintings are very simple and beautiful. Thank you Rinpoche and blog team for this very inspiring story . Makes one feel that there is nothing that we cannot achieve if we really put our heart in it. ??

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  • sarassitham
    Friday, Oct 30. 2020 05:17 PM
    Thank you for the sharing, Indonesia it’s a geological wonderland. Although Indonesia is a well-known for it’s largest Lake Toba and fascinating Bali and Lombok.

    I found Indonesia is a place must to visit because of it’s ancient historical site, rich culture, attractive beaches, beautiful islands, creative traditional crafts, varieties of foods and exotic natural scenery.

    I have discovered plenty interesting facts about Indonesia besides the largest country in Southeast Asia with thousands of small islands and active volcanoes.
  • S.Prathap
    Friday, Oct 30. 2020 02:44 PM
    Thank you very much for sharing this article whichreally inspires and motivates me. I also feels very blessed.The article tell us on the important advice by a great master like Zong Rinpoche.

    Reading this article and listening to the Holy voice of HH Kyabje Zong Rinpoche is a blessing. Incredible indeed hearing him explaining all about the truth of the Powerful Dharma Protector Dorje Shugden.


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  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Oct 30. 2020 12:23 PM
    Rinpoche’s compassionate quality had shown how devoted he was in his guru devotion towards Kensur Rinpoche. Kensur Rinpoche Jampa Yeshe was a renowned Dharma scholar and highly realised meditation master and one of the gurus of Tsem Rinpoche. Kensur Rinpoche was also the ex-abbot of Gaden Shartse Monastery. What Rinpoche did had proven in this lifetime to be a great incarnation. Rinpoche went all the way out taking care of Kensur Rinpoche, from arranging all the daily necessities and bringing Kensur Rinpoche to seek medical advice and treatments. Rinpoche’s guru devotion as an example for us.
    Thank you Pastor Seng Piow for this wonderful sharing some inspiring knowledge for us.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/behind-the-scenes/tsem-rinpoches-great-guru-devotion.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Oct 30. 2020 12:22 PM
    Even though it an old post yet to me its good to have some knowledge of this yummy Thukpa or Tibetan Noodle Soup. Thukpa is a Tibetan word used for any variety of soup cooked with noodles. From the blog picture Thukpa looks super tempting. I would surely to try this noodle soup. Thukpa is one among the popular noodle soups in India. Having a Nepalese restaurant in Kuala Lumnpur, Malaysia, that have thukpa will be wonderful as there are many Nepalese working in Malaysia.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/students-friends/khukri-and-nepal-street.html
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    A beautiful white car indeed . Looking at the pictures of Rinpoche in the car smiling tells us a thousand words. So so Rinpoche did own this beautiful car VW and Rinpoche did go around with it.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/etc/my-vw-beetle.html
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    Rinpoche’s compassion, kindness, caring, loving and down to earth nature, will go all the way reaching out to all living beings. May it be an animals or human beings Rinpoche will be kind . Giving foods to them and making sure all are well feed without going hungry. Rinpoche is truly a Bodhisattva , an inspiring example for us. Thank you Rinpoche for showing us the way.
    Thank you Pastor Khong Jean Ai for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/behind-the-scenes/posted-by-admin-tsem-rinpoche-cares-for-animals.html
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    Thursday, Oct 29. 2020 01:43 PM
    Clear explanations , the meaning behind of anyone taking vows let it be to go meatless. The significance of taking the Vegetarian Vow as it creates more merits , less killing of animals, sufferings of animals and so forth. In recent years, more people are aiming for healthy life style for not eating meat , to be a vegetarian. Taking a vegetarian vows to remind ourselves and stays put being a meatless or vegetarian.
    Thank you, Rinpoche, for this compassionate teaching.

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    Thursday, Oct 29. 2020 01:42 PM
    Tsem Rinpoche was one special Lama who had conceptualizes and built Kechara Forest retreat from scratch to where it was today. Rinpoche cares more for all sentient beings than himself. Rinpoche went all the way out to see the constructions work and get things done nor matter it’s a sunny day or raining day.
    Thank you Rinpoche with folded hands and Pastor Seng Piow for this sharing with great memories pictures of Rinpoche at the construction sites.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/behind-the-scenes/the-high-lama-that-builds.html
  • S.Prathap
    Wednesday, Oct 28. 2020 03:08 PM
    Reading comics is an interesting way to improves our verbal intelligence.
    Possessed is the latest title from Kechara Comics, an interesting story experienced by the Krishna family, living in Ipoh.
    Just like the printing of Sutras & traditional Dharma texts, modern publications such as these comics also generate vast merits and create the causes for Dorje Shugden’s lineage to grow.


    https://bit.ly/2TwGltW
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Oct 28. 2020 02:45 PM
    Great information and explaining all about the wonderful ways for us all of to collect merits . Giving (dana) is one of the essential preliminary steps of Buddhist practice. The practice of giving is universally recognized as one of the most basic human virtues .
    When practiced in itself, it is a basis of merit it leads ultimately to liberation from samsara. An act of giving will bring us happiness in the future, in accordance with the kammic law of cause and effect taught by the Buddha.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/etc/dana-offerings-for-tsem-ladrang.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Oct 28. 2020 02:43 PM
    Well, the practice of death meditation is a common practice in many Buddhist lineages. Everything that belongs to us is left behind at the time of death. By training our mind in death and impermanence, we can avert our attraction to the appearances of this life. If we think about death , it will motivates us to repair relationships and forgive in life. With preparation we can help others at death-time. The time of death is uncertain and there is no fixed lifespan in our world. At the time of death what’s really important is the Dharma practice. We learn, practice Dharma and putting it into action is the best choice we made before death. We are fortunate to have a chance to work in the Dharma and learning death meditation to prepare ourselves as the moment will come any time.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this great teachings with folded hands.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/kechara-13-depts/last-night-i-spoke-about-death-meditation-in-more-detail.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Oct 28. 2020 02:39 PM
    HE Tsem Rinpoche comes from Gaden Monastery,Rinpoche had travelled from US to be ordained in India. Gaden Monastery is a world-renowned monastic university which was founded in the 14th century by the great scholar and saint, Lama Tsongkhapa. The beginning of Gaden Monastery in India was very difficult due to many reasons. Financially was one and Rinpoche had helped and supported the monastery ’s education department from the very beginning . Even coming to Malaysia Rinpoche continued to support them raising funds to purchase new books for the library, computer facilities for the monks, furniture, fixtures etc. These has carried on till the present days to create great geshes, scholars, masters in the future.
    Thank you Pastor Seng Piow for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/behind-the-scenes/rinpoche-helps-monastic-education.html
  • S.Prathap
    Wednesday, Oct 28. 2020 12:02 AM
    We should share with more people about this piece of article, to let more know about this fact; thus more awareness are able to be created; more helps are able to extend to these animals; or less cruelty are being done to them.

    This is good article to bring out the awareness of how human cause the death of these animals where the animals are not capable to escape from the trap and captivity set up by human race.Thank you very much for sharing this article.


    https://bit.ly/3owIh3L
  • sarassitham
    Tuesday, Oct 27. 2020 06:20 PM
    Mother nature is truly amazing, there are a lot of interesting places in the world to discover and explore and this unique island of Japan and home to a majority of the population Okinawa is truly wonderful.

    Thank you for the interesting sharing of Okinawa, hope to visit the great place and witness live of the famous Naha Tug-of-War Festival. I loved all the photos shared especially the yummy foods, the fascinating Yokusendo Cave, traditional Okinawa Craft Village and the secret of Abu Park.

    https://bit.ly/2HGHRql


  • Samfoonheei
    Tuesday, Oct 27. 2020 01:01 PM
    Wow….In Thailand, priority seats are given to Buddhist monks, that’s wonderful. Monks in Thailand are well respected by many with the majority of Thailand practising Buddhism. We could see monks everywhere in Thailand. Most public transport in Bangkok has seats marked for monks. We used to see signage board stating elderly persons, disabled persons, pregnant women, and children were given priority. Priority seats have been designated in public transport vehicles such as train, bus monorail and other transport operators . It rare to see signage should yield their seat to the monks. I have yet come across such signage yet in Malaysia.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/etc/spirituality-on-the-train.html

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · »

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I must thank my dharma blog team who are great assets to me, Kechara and growth of dharma in this wonderful region. I am honoured and thrilled to work with them. I really am. Maybe I don't say it enough to them, but I am saying it now. I APPRECIATE THESE GUYS VERY MUCH!

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The Unknown

The Known and unknown are both feared,
Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
The unknown may be growth and opportunities,
One shall never know if one fears the unknown more than the known.
Who says the unknown would be worse than the known?
But then again, the unknown is sometimes worse than the known. In the end nothing is known unless we endeavour,
So go pursue all the way with the unknown,
because all unknown with familiarity becomes the known.
~Tsem Rinpoche

Photos On The Go

Click on the images to view the bigger version. And scroll down and click on "View All Photos" to view more images.
According to legend, Shambhala is a place where wisdom and love reign, and there is no crime. Doesn\'t this sound like the kind of place all of us would love to live in? https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=204874
9 months ago
According to legend, Shambhala is a place where wisdom and love reign, and there is no crime. Doesn't this sound like the kind of place all of us would love to live in? https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=204874
108 candles and sang (incense) offered at our Wish-Fulfilling Grotto, invoking Dorje Shugden\'s blessings for friends, sponsors and supporters, wonderful!
9 months ago
108 candles and sang (incense) offered at our Wish-Fulfilling Grotto, invoking Dorje Shugden's blessings for friends, sponsors and supporters, wonderful!
Dharmapalas are not exclusive to Tibetan culture and their practice is widespread throughout the Buddhist world - https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=193645
9 months ago
Dharmapalas are not exclusive to Tibetan culture and their practice is widespread throughout the Buddhist world - https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=193645
One of our adorable Kechara Forest Retreat\'s doggies, Tara, happy and safe, and enjoying herself in front of Wisdom Hall which has been decorated for Chinese New Year
9 months ago
One of our adorable Kechara Forest Retreat's doggies, Tara, happy and safe, and enjoying herself in front of Wisdom Hall which has been decorated for Chinese New Year
Fragrant organic Thai basil harvested from our very own Kechara Forest Retreat farm!
9 months ago
Fragrant organic Thai basil harvested from our very own Kechara Forest Retreat farm!
On behalf of our Puja House team, Pastor Tat Ming receives food and drinks from Rinpoche. Rinpoche wanted to make sure the hardworking Puja House team are always taken care of.
9 months ago
On behalf of our Puja House team, Pastor Tat Ming receives food and drinks from Rinpoche. Rinpoche wanted to make sure the hardworking Puja House team are always taken care of.
By the time I heard about Luang Phor Thong, he was already very old, in his late 80s. When I heard about him, I immediately wanted to go and pay my respects to him. - http://bit.ly/LuangPhorThong
10 months ago
By the time I heard about Luang Phor Thong, he was already very old, in his late 80s. When I heard about him, I immediately wanted to go and pay my respects to him. - http://bit.ly/LuangPhorThong
It\'s very nice to see volunteers helping maintain holy sites in Kechara Forest Retreat, it\'s very good for them. Cleaning Buddha statues is a very powerful and effective way of purifying body karma.
10 months ago
It's very nice to see volunteers helping maintain holy sites in Kechara Forest Retreat, it's very good for them. Cleaning Buddha statues is a very powerful and effective way of purifying body karma.
Kechara Forest Retreat is preparing for the upcoming Chinese New Year celebrations. This is our holy Vajra Yogini stupa which is now surrounded by beautiful lanterns organised by our students.
10 months ago
Kechara Forest Retreat is preparing for the upcoming Chinese New Year celebrations. This is our holy Vajra Yogini stupa which is now surrounded by beautiful lanterns organised by our students.
One of the most recent harvests from our Kechara Forest Retreat land. It was grown free of chemicals and pesticides, wonderful!
10 months ago
One of the most recent harvests from our Kechara Forest Retreat land. It was grown free of chemicals and pesticides, wonderful!
Third picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
1 year ago
Third picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
Second picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
1 year ago
Second picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
First picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
1 year ago
First picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
The first title published by Kechara Comics is Karuna Finds A Way. It tells the tale of high-school sweethearts Karuna and Adam who had what some would call the dream life. Everything was going great for them until one day when reality came knocking on their door. Caught in a surprise swindle, this loving family who never harmed anyone found themselves out of luck and down on their fortune. Determined to save her family, Karuna goes all out to find a solution. See what she does- https://bit.ly/2LSKuWo
1 year ago
The first title published by Kechara Comics is Karuna Finds A Way. It tells the tale of high-school sweethearts Karuna and Adam who had what some would call the dream life. Everything was going great for them until one day when reality came knocking on their door. Caught in a surprise swindle, this loving family who never harmed anyone found themselves out of luck and down on their fortune. Determined to save her family, Karuna goes all out to find a solution. See what she does- https://bit.ly/2LSKuWo
Very powerful story! Tibetan Resistance group Chushi Gangdruk reveals how Dalai Lama escaped in 1959- https://bit.ly/2S9VMGX
1 year ago
Very powerful story! Tibetan Resistance group Chushi Gangdruk reveals how Dalai Lama escaped in 1959- https://bit.ly/2S9VMGX
At Kechara Forest Retreat land we have nice fresh spinach growing free of chemicals and pesticides. Yes!
1 year ago
At Kechara Forest Retreat land we have nice fresh spinach growing free of chemicals and pesticides. Yes!
See beautiful pictures of Manjushri Guest House here- https://bit.ly/2WGo0ti
1 year ago
See beautiful pictures of Manjushri Guest House here- https://bit.ly/2WGo0ti
Beginner’s Introduction to Dorje Shugden~Very good overview https://bit.ly/2QQNfYv
1 year ago
Beginner’s Introduction to Dorje Shugden~Very good overview https://bit.ly/2QQNfYv
Fresh eggplants grown on Kechara Forest Retreat\'s land here in Malaysia
1 year ago
Fresh eggplants grown on Kechara Forest Retreat's land here in Malaysia
Most Venerable Uppalavanna – The Chief Female Disciple of Buddha Shakyamuni - She exhibited many supernatural abilities gained from meditation and proved to the world females and males are equal in spirituality- https://bit.ly/31d9Rat
1 year ago
Most Venerable Uppalavanna – The Chief Female Disciple of Buddha Shakyamuni - She exhibited many supernatural abilities gained from meditation and proved to the world females and males are equal in spirituality- https://bit.ly/31d9Rat
Thailand’s ‘Renegade’ Yet Powerful Buddhist Nuns~ https://bit.ly/2Z1C02m
1 year ago
Thailand’s ‘Renegade’ Yet Powerful Buddhist Nuns~ https://bit.ly/2Z1C02m
Mahapajapati Gotami – the first Buddhist nun ordained by Lord Buddha- https://bit.ly/2IjD8ru
1 year ago
Mahapajapati Gotami – the first Buddhist nun ordained by Lord Buddha- https://bit.ly/2IjD8ru
The Largest Buddha Shakyamuni in Russia | 俄罗斯最大的释迦牟尼佛画像- https://bit.ly/2Wpclni
1 year ago
The Largest Buddha Shakyamuni in Russia | 俄罗斯最大的释迦牟尼佛画像- https://bit.ly/2Wpclni
Sacred Vajra Yogini
1 year ago
Sacred Vajra Yogini
Dorje Shugden works & archives - a labour of commitment - https://bit.ly/30Tp2p8
1 year ago
Dorje Shugden works & archives - a labour of commitment - https://bit.ly/30Tp2p8
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha.
1 year ago
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha.
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha. She was his step-mother and aunt. Buddha\'s mother had passed away at his birth so he was raised by Gotami.
1 year ago
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha. She was his step-mother and aunt. Buddha's mother had passed away at his birth so he was raised by Gotami.
Another nun disciple of Lord Buddha\'s. She had achieved great spiritual abilities and high attainments. She would be a proper object of refuge. This image of the eminent bhikkhuni (nun) disciple of the Buddha, Uppalavanna Theri.
1 year ago
Another nun disciple of Lord Buddha's. She had achieved great spiritual abilities and high attainments. She would be a proper object of refuge. This image of the eminent bhikkhuni (nun) disciple of the Buddha, Uppalavanna Theri.
Wandering Ascetic Painting by Nirdesha Munasinghe
1 year ago
Wandering Ascetic Painting by Nirdesha Munasinghe
High Sri Lankan monks visit Kechara to bless our land, temple, Buddha and Dorje Shugden images. They were very kind-see pictures- https://bit.ly/2HQie2M
1 year ago
High Sri Lankan monks visit Kechara to bless our land, temple, Buddha and Dorje Shugden images. They were very kind-see pictures- https://bit.ly/2HQie2M
This is pretty amazing!

First Sri Lankan Buddhist temple opened in Dubai!!!
1 year ago
This is pretty amazing! First Sri Lankan Buddhist temple opened in Dubai!!!
My Dharma boy (left) and Oser girl loves to laze around on the veranda in the mornings. They enjoy all the trees, grass and relaxing under the hot sun. Sunbathing is a favorite daily activity. I care about these two doggies of mine very much and I enjoy seeing them happy. They are with me always. Tsem Rinpoche

Always be kind to animals and eat vegetarian- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
1 year ago
My Dharma boy (left) and Oser girl loves to laze around on the veranda in the mornings. They enjoy all the trees, grass and relaxing under the hot sun. Sunbathing is a favorite daily activity. I care about these two doggies of mine very much and I enjoy seeing them happy. They are with me always. Tsem Rinpoche Always be kind to animals and eat vegetarian- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
After you left me Mumu, I was alone. I have no family or kin. You were my family. I can\'t stop thinking of you and I can\'t forget you. My bond and connection with you is so strong. I wish you were by my side. Tsem Rinpoche
1 year ago
After you left me Mumu, I was alone. I have no family or kin. You were my family. I can't stop thinking of you and I can't forget you. My bond and connection with you is so strong. I wish you were by my side. Tsem Rinpoche
This story is a life-changer. Learn about the incredible Forest Man of India | 印度“森林之子”- https://bit.ly/2Eh4vRS
1 year ago
This story is a life-changer. Learn about the incredible Forest Man of India | 印度“森林之子”- https://bit.ly/2Eh4vRS
Part 2-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
1 year ago
Part 2-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
Part 1-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
1 year ago
Part 1-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
The great Protector Manjushri Dorje Shugden depicted in the beautiful Mongolian style. To download a high resolution file: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
1 year ago
The great Protector Manjushri Dorje Shugden depicted in the beautiful Mongolian style. To download a high resolution file: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
The Mystical land of Shambhala is finally ready for everyone to feast their eyes and be blessed. A beautiful post with information, art work, history, spirituality and a beautiful book composed by His Holiness the 6th Panchen Rinpoche. ~ https://bit.ly/309MHBi
1 year ago
The Mystical land of Shambhala is finally ready for everyone to feast their eyes and be blessed. A beautiful post with information, art work, history, spirituality and a beautiful book composed by His Holiness the 6th Panchen Rinpoche. ~ https://bit.ly/309MHBi
Beautiful pictures of the huge Buddha in Longkou Nanshan- https://bit.ly/2LsBxVb
1 year ago
Beautiful pictures of the huge Buddha in Longkou Nanshan- https://bit.ly/2LsBxVb
The reason-Very interesting thought- https://bit.ly/2V7VT5r
1 year ago
The reason-Very interesting thought- https://bit.ly/2V7VT5r
NEW Bigfoot cafe in Malaysia! Food is delicious!- https://bit.ly/2VxdGau
1 year ago
NEW Bigfoot cafe in Malaysia! Food is delicious!- https://bit.ly/2VxdGau
DON\'T MISS THIS!~How brave Bonnie survived by living with a herd of deer~ https://bit.ly/2Lre2eY
1 year ago
DON'T MISS THIS!~How brave Bonnie survived by living with a herd of deer~ https://bit.ly/2Lre2eY
Global Superpower China Will Cut Meat Consumption by 50%! Very interesting, find out more- https://bit.ly/2V1sJFh
1 year ago
Global Superpower China Will Cut Meat Consumption by 50%! Very interesting, find out more- https://bit.ly/2V1sJFh
You can download this beautiful Egyptian style Dorje Shugden Free- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
1 year ago
You can download this beautiful Egyptian style Dorje Shugden Free- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
Beautiful high file for print of Lord Manjushri. May you be blessed- https://bit.ly/2V8mwZe
1 year ago
Beautiful high file for print of Lord Manjushri. May you be blessed- https://bit.ly/2V8mwZe
Mongolian (Oymiakon) Shaman in Siberia, Russia. That is his real outfit he wears. Very unique. TR
1 year ago
Mongolian (Oymiakon) Shaman in Siberia, Russia. That is his real outfit he wears. Very unique. TR
Find one of the most beautiful temples in the world in Nara, Japan. It is the 1,267 year old Todai-ji temple that houses a 15 meter Buddha Vairocana statue who is a cosmic and timeless Buddha. Emperor Shomu who sponsored this beautiful temple eventually abdicated and ordained as a Buddhist monk. Very interesting history and story. One of the places everyone should visit- https://bit.ly/2VgsHhK
1 year ago
Find one of the most beautiful temples in the world in Nara, Japan. It is the 1,267 year old Todai-ji temple that houses a 15 meter Buddha Vairocana statue who is a cosmic and timeless Buddha. Emperor Shomu who sponsored this beautiful temple eventually abdicated and ordained as a Buddhist monk. Very interesting history and story. One of the places everyone should visit- https://bit.ly/2VgsHhK
Manjusri Kumara (bodhisattva of wisdom), India, Pala dynesty, 9th century, stone, Honolulu Academy of Arts
1 year ago
Manjusri Kumara (bodhisattva of wisdom), India, Pala dynesty, 9th century, stone, Honolulu Academy of Arts
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Videos On The Go

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    10 months ago
    Pig puts his toys away
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    1 years ago
    Always be kind to animals-They deserve to live just like us.
    Whales and dolphins playing with each other in the Pacific sea. Nature is truly incredible!
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    1 years ago
    Bodha stupa July 2019-
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    1 years ago
    Cute Tara girl having a snack. She is one of Kechara Forest Retreat’s resident doggies.
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    1 years ago
    Your Next Meal!
    Yummy? Tasty? Behind the scenes of the meat on your plates. Meat is a killing industry.
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    1 years ago
    This is Daw
    This is what they do to get meat on tables, and to produce belts and jackets. Think twice before your next purchase.
  • Don’t Take My Mummy Away!
    1 years ago
    Don’t Take My Mummy Away!
    Look at the poor baby chasing after the mother. Why do we do that to them? It's time to seriously think about our choices in life and how they affect others. Be kind. Don't break up families.
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    1 years ago
    They do this every day!
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    1 years ago
    What happened at Fair Oaks Farm?
    The largest undercover dairy investigation of all time. See what they found out at Fair Oaks Farm.
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    1 years ago
    She’s going to spend her whole life here without being able to move correctly. Like a machine. They are the slaves of the people and are viewed as a product. It’s immoral. Billions of terrestrial animals die annually. Billions. You can’t even imagine it. And all that because people don’t want to give up meat, even though there are so many alternatives. ~ Gabriel Azimov
  • Our Malaysian Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir speaks so well, logically and regarding our country’s collaboration with China for growth. It is refreshing to listen to Dr. Mahathir’s thoughts. He said our country can look to China for many more things such as technology and so on. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    Our Malaysian Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir speaks so well, logically and regarding our country’s collaboration with China for growth. It is refreshing to listen to Dr. Mahathir’s thoughts. He said our country can look to China for many more things such as technology and so on. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This is the first time His Holiness Dalai Lama mentions he had some very serious illness. Very worrying. This video is captured April 2019.
    2 yearss ago
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  • Beautiful Monastery in Hong Kong
    2 yearss ago
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    2 yearss ago
    This dog thanks his hero in such a touching way. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
    2 yearss ago
    Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
  • These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
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    2 yearss ago
    Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
    2 yearss ago
    Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
  • Recitation of Dorje Dermo‘s mantra or the Dharani of Glorious Vajra Claws. This powerful mantra is meant to destroy all obstacles that come in our way. Beneficial to play this mantra in our environments.
    2 yearss ago
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    2 yearss ago
    Beautiful
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    2 yearss ago
    My little monster cute babies Dharma and Oser. Take a look and get a cute attack for the day! Tsem Rinpoche
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    SUPER ADORABLE and must see
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    Cute!
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    2 yearss ago
    Enjoy a peaceful morning at Kechara Forest Retreat
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    This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
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  • This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
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    This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
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  • Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
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    Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
  • What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    3 yearss ago
    What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
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  • This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
    3 yearss ago
    This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
  • SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    3 yearss ago
    SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    This happens daily in slaughterhouse so you can get your pork and Bak ku teh. Stop eating meat.

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CHAT PICTURES

Last weekend a Soup Kitchen activities @ Penang, Johor & Kuala Lumpur. Hot food, water, masks, biscuits, buns & fruits. This is what we give out to our friends living on the streets. Thank you to our sponsor & volunteers that make it happen. Come spread more love by being a volunteer at our activities. WhatsApp us today at 010-333-3260! See you soon! #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 weeks ago
Last weekend a Soup Kitchen activities @ Penang, Johor & Kuala Lumpur. Hot food, water, masks, biscuits, buns & fruits. This is what we give out to our friends living on the streets. Thank you to our sponsor & volunteers that make it happen. Come spread more love by being a volunteer at our activities. WhatsApp us today at 010-333-3260! See you soon! #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Fwd: Dear Sotha
4 weeks ago
Fwd: Dear Sotha
Kechara Earth Project 13/9/2020
1 month ago
Kechara Earth Project 13/9/2020
Thank you Domino's Pizza Malaysia, Kasih & Piza campaign for sponsoring 85 boxes of pizza to our friends who live on the streets. Your flavourful pizzas have put a smile on their faces. Thank you! - Vivan @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #KasihdanPiza #ItsAllAboutYou
2 months ago
Thank you Domino's Pizza Malaysia, Kasih & Piza campaign for sponsoring 85 boxes of pizza to our friends who live on the streets. Your flavourful pizzas have put a smile on their faces. Thank you! - Vivan @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #KasihdanPiza #ItsAllAboutYou
Thank you Novo Nordisk! Your kind monetary donation and 1,320 boxes of masks will benefit many needy families under the Kechara Food Bank Program. Thank you! Much love from the needy families  ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #novonordisk #novonordiskmalaysia
2 months ago
Thank you Novo Nordisk! Your kind monetary donation and 1,320 boxes of masks will benefit many needy families under the Kechara Food Bank Program. Thank you! Much love from the needy families ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #novonordisk #novonordiskmalaysia
We were graced with the presence of Tengku Zatashah & The Alice Smith School Foundation yesterday. 130 homeless were blessed to be served by them. RM 20,000 donated by Alice Smith School Foundation will benefit 100 families registered under Kechara Food Bank Program. Thank you! Much love from the needy families ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #alicesmithschoolfoundation #alicesmithschool #volunteerism #homeless
2 months ago
We were graced with the presence of Tengku Zatashah & The Alice Smith School Foundation yesterday. 130 homeless were blessed to be served by them. RM 20,000 donated by Alice Smith School Foundation will benefit 100 families registered under Kechara Food Bank Program. Thank you! Much love from the needy families ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen #kecharafoodbank #kecharaempowerment #kecharasoupkitchen #alicesmithschoolfoundation #alicesmithschool #volunteerism #homeless
Thanks to the effort of our outstation team, we were able to mobilise food provisions to 600 families living in Kelantan, Penang, Negeri Sembilan, Melaka and Johor during the Raya period with each of these families receiving RM200 worth of provisions. Adding onto the current 368 families in Klang Valley, a total of 968 families were benefitted from this. Special thanks to the sponsors who have contributed especially Hong Leong Foundation and partially from Tesco Malaysia (where we also ordered the provisions from). ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 months ago
Thanks to the effort of our outstation team, we were able to mobilise food provisions to 600 families living in Kelantan, Penang, Negeri Sembilan, Melaka and Johor during the Raya period with each of these families receiving RM200 worth of provisions. Adding onto the current 368 families in Klang Valley, a total of 968 families were benefitted from this. Special thanks to the sponsors who have contributed especially Hong Leong Foundation and partially from Tesco Malaysia (where we also ordered the provisions from). ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
So glad that our soup kitchen operations are back in full swing. Good to see the clients are observing the SOPs. Some of them lost their job during MCO and ended up on the streets. Special thanks to our sponsors and volunteers for the great support! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 months ago
So glad that our soup kitchen operations are back in full swing. Good to see the clients are observing the SOPs. Some of them lost their job during MCO and ended up on the streets. Special thanks to our sponsors and volunteers for the great support! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
From serving cooked food to the homeless clients on the streets to mobilising provisions to the needy individuals in PPRs and shelters, we thank everyone of our Johor Bahru team for their kind contributions and effort to make it for the needy despite all the challenges! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
5 months ago
From serving cooked food to the homeless clients on the streets to mobilising provisions to the needy individuals in PPRs and shelters, we thank everyone of our Johor Bahru team for their kind contributions and effort to make it for the needy despite all the challenges! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
More photos taken from our "Hari Raya Hampers" distribution this week. Making sure everyone of our clients have something to be cheerful about. Apart from food, daily used items such as hygiene products, kitchen utensils, assorted fabric items, stationary items and toys were also included into our hamper bags making it extra heavier this month! Food items alone were about 35kg per family! Taking this opportunity to wish everyone of our Muslim volunteers, friends, supporters and clients a Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Maaf Zahir Batin. No doubt this year's celebration will be very different but appreciate everyone is safe and protected from the pandemic. We are in this together and let's work to fight this pandemic together! Thanking all sponsors and donors for the generous support enabling us to continue serve the needy with food, love and care. Big shoutout too to our wonderful team which already depleted by our very own strict SOP. All of you who worked tirelessly behind the s
5 months ago
More photos taken from our "Hari Raya Hampers" distribution this week. Making sure everyone of our clients have something to be cheerful about. Apart from food, daily used items such as hygiene products, kitchen utensils, assorted fabric items, stationary items and toys were also included into our hamper bags making it extra heavier this month! Food items alone were about 35kg per family! Taking this opportunity to wish everyone of our Muslim volunteers, friends, supporters and clients a Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Maaf Zahir Batin. No doubt this year's celebration will be very different but appreciate everyone is safe and protected from the pandemic. We are in this together and let's work to fight this pandemic together! Thanking all sponsors and donors for the generous support enabling us to continue serve the needy with food, love and care. Big shoutout too to our wonderful team which already depleted by our very own strict SOP. All of you who worked tirelessly behind the s
Our team have been working extra hours for the past few weeks to deliver provisions and hamper goodies to the needy families before Hari Raya! Heart warming to see the smiling faces of our recipients upon receiving 3 bags full of food and daily used items. Thanks to everyone of you who have contributed to our foodbank enabling us to give all our recipients (especially those celebrating) a Raya to remember! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
5 months ago
Our team have been working extra hours for the past few weeks to deliver provisions and hamper goodies to the needy families before Hari Raya! Heart warming to see the smiling faces of our recipients upon receiving 3 bags full of food and daily used items. Thanks to everyone of you who have contributed to our foodbank enabling us to give all our recipients (especially those celebrating) a Raya to remember! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Thankful to all donors and those who have been committed in contributing not just money but time over the past testing weeks to help us ease the work of our frontliners and also the livelihood of the needy, their struggles over this pandemic period seemed a little easier to bear with because of your contributions! - Vivian @Kechara Soup Kitchen
5 months ago
Thankful to all donors and those who have been committed in contributing not just money but time over the past testing weeks to help us ease the work of our frontliners and also the livelihood of the needy, their struggles over this pandemic period seemed a little easier to bear with because of your contributions! - Vivian @Kechara Soup Kitchen
KSDS Level 2 virtual class, Lin Mun KSDS
5 months ago
KSDS Level 2 virtual class, Lin Mun KSDS
KSDS Level 3 virtual class. Lin Mun KSDS
5 months ago
KSDS Level 3 virtual class. Lin Mun KSDS
Wesak 2020
6 months ago
Wesak 2020
Recycle today for a better tomorrow. KEP-Serena
8 months ago
Recycle today for a better tomorrow. KEP-Serena
Today we are having recycling at Kechara Soup Kitchen. Do drop by here if you would like to get ride of the recyclable items from home. KEP - Serena
8 months ago
Today we are having recycling at Kechara Soup Kitchen. Do drop by here if you would like to get ride of the recyclable items from home. KEP - Serena
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Seen here is Bam, Vajrayogini’s seed syllable and also Kechara's logo. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Seen here is Bam, Vajrayogini’s seed syllable and also Kechara's logo. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: More melted butter was offered. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: More melted butter was offered. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
H.E. Zawa Rinpoche in deep concentration. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
H.E. Zawa Rinpoche in deep concentration. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Geshela is seen here wearing ceremonial hat called tsoksha. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Geshela is seen here wearing ceremonial hat called tsoksha. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
The Shize Fire Puja was performed according to scriptural sources. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
The Shize Fire Puja was performed according to scriptural sources. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
To find out more about the substances offered during jinsek/fire puja, have a read here: http://bit.ly/WhatIsFirePuja - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
To find out more about the substances offered during jinsek/fire puja, have a read here: http://bit.ly/WhatIsFirePuja - shared by Pastor Antoinette
More about the symbolism of the offering items here: http://bit.ly/WhatIsFirePuja - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
More about the symbolism of the offering items here: http://bit.ly/WhatIsFirePuja - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Amongst all pujas, the fire puja is considered the king of all Pujas. It is the most powerful of all pujas within Tibetan Buddhism and its purpose is basically to remove all obstacles and its stains to enlightenment.
8 months ago
Amongst all pujas, the fire puja is considered the king of all Pujas. It is the most powerful of all pujas within Tibetan Buddhism and its purpose is basically to remove all obstacles and its stains to enlightenment.
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Graceful hand mudras were also part of the ritual. - shared Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Graceful hand mudras were also part of the ritual. - shared Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: One by one the offering substances were offered accompanied by traditional Tibetan recitations. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: One by one the offering substances were offered accompanied by traditional Tibetan recitations. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: JP Thong ensuring that Geshela's ritual items are within easy reach. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: JP Thong ensuring that Geshela's ritual items are within easy reach. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Pastor David Lai & Frederick Law were also on hand to assist with the puja ritual substances. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Pastor David Lai & Frederick Law were also on hand to assist with the puja ritual substances. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Pastor Niral Patel assisting H.E. Zawa Rinpoche during the puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Pastor Niral Patel assisting H.E. Zawa Rinpoche during the puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Peaceful fire pujas are excellent to remove inauspiciousness, problems that might be coming to our lifespan, wisdom, wealth, growth of Dharma. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Peaceful fire pujas are excellent to remove inauspiciousness, problems that might be coming to our lifespan, wisdom, wealth, growth of Dharma. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Over 100 Kecharians & their loved ones spent the Sunday evening immersed in this obstacle pacifying puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Over 100 Kecharians & their loved ones spent the Sunday evening immersed in this obstacle pacifying puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: H.E. Zawa Dakpa and Geshe Janchup Gyaltsen Lama inspecting the offering substances. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: H.E. Zawa Dakpa and Geshe Janchup Gyaltsen Lama inspecting the offering substances. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: H.E. Zawa Rinpoche & Geshe Janchup making last minute checks before the commencement of the Jinsek or Fire Puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: H.E. Zawa Rinpoche & Geshe Janchup making last minute checks before the commencement of the Jinsek or Fire Puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: The arrival of the Sangha conducting this sacred puja accompanied by Changtso Beng Kooi and Pastor Niral Patel - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: The arrival of the Sangha conducting this sacred puja accompanied by Changtso Beng Kooi and Pastor Niral Patel - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: The site of the Peaceful Fire Puja the calls upon the pacifying energies of Shize Shugden. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: The site of the Peaceful Fire Puja the calls upon the pacifying energies of Shize Shugden. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: A close-up of the ladle. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: A close-up of the ladle. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Substances such as sticks, melted butter, kusha grass, lentils and barley were traditionally offered during the prayers to create the causes for merits, long life and to pacify obstacles. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Substances such as sticks, melted butter, kusha grass, lentils and barley were traditionally offered during the prayers to create the causes for merits, long life and to pacify obstacles. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Beautifully handcrafted torma or food offering to the Buddha. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Beautifully handcrafted torma or food offering to the Buddha. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Some of the many offering items & substances used during this highly blessed Fire Puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
8 months ago
Highlights from the Shize Peaceful Fire Puja: Some of the many offering items & substances used during this highly blessed Fire Puja. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
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Dorje Shugden
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