Emperor Ashoka the Great

Aug 16, 2016 | Views: 12,582
Emperor Ashoka the Great

Emperor Ashoka the Great

(By Tsem Rinpoche and P. Prashant)

Dear readers,

I am thrilled to have been given this opportunity to write about Emperor Ashoka the Great. During his early reign, he was a fierce ruler and yet he was able to change his way in later life and became a compassionate ruler. This is inspiring in itself because change can be a difficult thing to do, especially when you are habituated to do and think in a certain way. For this reason, I admire his resolve and courage to stop the cycle of war and violence.

Although India is no longer a Buddhist country, the results of Emperor Ashoka’s considerable effort and dedication in spreading the Dharma to neighboring countries can still be felt. I hope you will find this article exciting and informative on the life, works and accomplishments of this great ruler. Enjoy and be inspired by Emperor Ashoka!

Sincerely,
P. Prashant

 


 

ASHOKA THE GREAT

Emperor Ashoka, also known as ‘Ashoka the Great’, was the third ruler of the Mauryan Empire, and many consider him to be one of the greatest rulers in Indian history. H.G. Wells, a 20th century English writer, called him the ‘Greatest of Kings.’

During Emperor Ashoka’s reign, India had a relatively well-managed government system. The reign of Emperor Ashoka is considered to be one of the most glorious periods in Indian history. During the first part of his reign, he worked systematically to consolidate and expand his empire. He ruled over the entire Indian subcontinent, except for the southernmost parts (i.e., Tamil Nadu and Kerala). During the later part of his reign, he is largely credited and admired for spreading the message of Buddhism and peace in many parts of the world. Although Buddhism faded in India after his death, it continued to flourish and spread in other parts of the world, primarily in East and Southeast Asia.

Emperor Bindusara Maurya

Emperor Bindusara Maurya

Emperor Ashoka remained ambitious and fearsome until the annexation of Kalinga, a feudal republic located on the coast of the present day Indian state of Odisha and northern parts of Andhra Pradesh. The war to occupy Kalinga was considered the bloodiest and most lethal that Emperor Ashoka had ever waged. The massive loss of lives and damage left him shattered and regretful, which ultimately caused him to transform from a fierce and vengeful ruler to a peaceful and benevolent emperor. He is said to have constructed approximately 84,000 stupas and pillars across his empire during his lifetime. The most significant of these are the Ashoka Pillars that contain the image of the Lion Capital of Ashoka, which is now regarded as India’s national emblem, and the Ashoka Chakras, inscribed on many of his stone inscriptions.

 

ASHOKA’S FAMILY AND CHILDHOOD

Our knowledge about the history of his reign is based on inscriptions engraved on rocks and pillars, many of which still can be seen today. However, these inscriptions do not provide much information about his early life. For this we have to depend solely on Buddhist texts like the Divyavadana and Ceylonese chronicles like Avadana, Dipavamsa and Mahavamsa to obtain the information regarding his early life.

Ashoka (304 – 232 BCE) was born in the town of Pataliputra and was given the name Devanampriya Priyadarshi Samrat Ashoka. He was born to the second emperor of the Mauryan Dynasty, Emperor Bindusara and his relatively lower ranking wife, Shubhadrangi also known as Maharani Dharma, as stated in the Avadana text. By the virtue of his parenting, he was the grandson of the Founder of the Mauryan Dynasty, Chandragupta Maurya. According to the Ashokavadana, an Indian text in Sanskrit that describes the birth and reign of the Emperor Ashoka, Shubhadrangi was the daughter of a Brahmin from the city of Champa. The legend says that through palace intrigue she was initially kept away from Emperor Bindusara. However, she eventually gained access to him and was able to bear him a son. It is from her exclamation “I am now without sorrow” that Ashoka got his name which means “painless, without sorrow” in the ancient Sanskrit language.

Emperor Chandragupta Maurya

Emperor Chandragupta Maurya

Ashoka’s father, Emperor Bindusara (b. 320 – 273 BCE), was the son of Emperor Chandragupta Maurya and one of his wives, Durdhara. She died giving birth to Bindusara. When she was pregnant, she ate with her husband, the emperor. Durdhara was not informed that the food eaten by Emperor Chandragupta always had a controlled amount of poison to build up his immunity towards being poisoned. The poison was added to the food by his Chief Minister, Chanakya, as a precautionary measure to protect Emperor Chandragupta because he had many enemies, and many attempts were made to poison him. Therefore, when Durdhara ate the same food as the emperor, she did not have the immune system to neutralise the poison and her body reacted negatively. Before she took her last breath, Chanakya who had mastered Ayurveda knowledge and skills, removed Bindusara from his mother’s womb by performing a cesarean section. Durdhara died after giving birth to Bindusara.

A depiction of Chanakya.

Chanakya, the famous minister of both Emperor Chandragupta and Bindusara’s courts

Emperor Chandragupta Maurya left his son, Bindusara, a large and extensive empire. Bindusara was enthroned in 298 BCE. Chanakya was the most famous minister under Chandragupta’s rule, and he continued to be one of the principal ministers during Emperor Bindusara’s reign. Chanakya further extended the Mauryan Empire during the reign of Emperor Bindusara Maurya. The Empire is said to have extended from the east to the west and can be explained by the fact that it stretched from the eastern sea in Bengal to the western sea in Saurashtra.

Like his father, Emperor Bindusara Maurya also maintained good diplomatic relations with the Greek rulers and his step grandfather Selecus Nicator, a former general of Alexander the Great. He also shared cordial relations with his step uncle, the Syrian King, and the Egyptian rulers. Scholars from Egypt and Syria lived in his palace as ambassadors. Emperor Bindusara was passionate about culture and philosophy. He is believed to have been tolerant of all religious sects and saints of various religions visited his court. Ashoka might have learnt from the very men who graced his father’s court.

Ashoka had several elder siblings, all of whom were his half-brothers from the other wives of Emperor Bindusara, who had 16 wives and approximately 101 sons. The name of his eldest son is said to have been Susima and the name of the youngest son was Tishya.

Selecus Nicator

Selecus Nicator

Having been born into a royal family, Emperor Ashoka received extensive royal military training, and he was believed to be the most intelligent among the many sons of his father. He was intellectual, energetic, fearless, strong, fought well and possessed great military skills. He also excelled in hunting, which was evident from his ability to kill a lion with only a wooden rod. It was because of these attributes that Ashoka is said to have been the favorite of his grandfather, Emperor Chandragupta. According to legend, Ashoka recovered Chandragupta’s sword after he cast it away prior to embarking on the life of a Jain ascetic.

 

ASHOKA’S LIFE BEFORE ENTHRONEMENT

The depiction of Emperor Ashoka during his younger days.

A depiction of Emperor Ashoka during his younger days

Ashoka grew to become an extraordinary warrior and a shrewd statesman. He commanded several regiments of the Mauryan army. His growing popularity across the Mauryan Empire made his elder brothers feel insecure about their chances of becoming the next king. In a feeble attempt to end Ashoka’s life in war, or to destroy his reputation through failure, Prince Susima, the eldest son and crown prince to the throne, asked their father Emperor Bindusara to assign Ashoka on a mission to quell an uprising in the city of Taxila in the Northwestern province of Sindh. Ironically, Susima was actually the governor of this city. Susima and his officials did not govern Taxila well, and this caused civil unrest.

The ruin of Taxila.

The ruin of Taxila

Because Susima’s mother was a princess, Susima was King Bindusara’s favorite son. By comparison, Ashoka’s mother was a commoner by birth and King Bindusara is said to have not liked Ashoka very much initially. Perhaps it was because of this reason that Bindusara accepted Susima’s suggestion and commanded Ashoka to quell the uprising in Taxila. Ashoka, being the fearless war general that he was, complied with his father’s request. Upon hearing the news that Ashoka and his army were coming, the militias surprisingly welcomed him and almost immediately ended the uprising without a fight.

Ashoka’s success made Emperor Bindusara’s many sons wary of his intentions of succeeding the throne, and once again Susima suggested to Emperor Bindusara to send Ashoka away. This time he was sent into exile in Kalinga. During his stay there, he fell in love with a fisherwoman named Karuvaki who, according to inscriptions that were found recently, became Ashoka’s second or third wife.

Maharani Devi: First Queen of Ashoka the Great

Maharani Devi: First Queen of Ashoka the Great

After Ashoka was exiled for two years, a violent uprising broke out in Ujjain. King Bindusara sent Ashoka and his generals to quell the uprising there. Although Ashoka was injured during battle, his generals managed to complete the task successfully. After his injury, Ashoka was treated by Buddhist monks (bhikshus) and nuns (bhikshunis) in hiding to prevent those loyal to Susima from harming him. This is where he first learnt of Buddha’s teachings. He had a personal nurse, Devi, who was a merchant’s daughter from the famous Shakya clan. Her full name was Mahadevi Shakya Kumari and she was born in Vidisa. Ashoka grew fond of Devi and married her.

Emperor Bindusara disliked the fact that Ashoka married a Buddhist and thus forbade Ashoka to stay in Pataliputra. He sent him back to Ujjain with the title of Provincial Governor. Emperor Bindusara’s dislike of Ashoka’s marriage was most likely due to Buddhism’s rejection of the caste system. This rejection was considered to be socially dangerous, with the potential to destabilise the status quo and therefore seen as a threat to the monarchy. Buddhism also denied the authority and roles of the Brahmins, which are the highest class of Hindu society. As a result, Buddhists were seen as undermining India’s social system.

 

EMPEROR ASHOKA’S FAMILY & PRIVATE LIFE

When Emperor Ashoka was 20 years old, one of his wives, Maharani Devi gave birth to twins, a son named Mahendra and a daughter named Sanghamitta. Later, both Mahendra and Sanghamitta contributed and played a great role in the spread of Buddhism after their father sent them to preach Buddhism outside India.

Emperor Ashoka had several wives although the exact number is unclear. There are references to at least three empresses in the chronicles and Buddhist texts like the Mahavamsa and Divyavadana. Emperor Ashoka’s Chief Empress for most of his reign was Empress Asandhimittra who passed away four years before King Ashoka’s own passing. Upon the passing of Empress Asandhimittra, Tissarakkha was given the position of Chief Empress. It is said that this empress had a very great influence on Ashoka.

The second empress of Ashoka was Karuvaki, the mother of Trivara as mentioned in the Empress’s edict. Another Empress referred to in the Divyavadana as his third wife was Padmavati who was the mother of the crown prince Kunala, also known as Dharma-vivardhana. The Chinese Buddhist monk, Faxian, who travelled from China to India by foot on a mission to acquire Buddhist texts, also mentioned Dharma-vivardhana, who was the Viceroy of Gandhara, to be the son of Emperor Ashoka. From Rajatarangini, a historical chronicle, we can find references to the other sons of Emperor Ashoka, Jalauka and Tivara, who were the sons of Empress Karuvaki. From the information given, it is reasonable to believe that although Emperor Ashoka was a Buddhist, he had a number of empresses and concubines.

There is little information available concerning Emperor Ashoka’s private life and habits. From Rock Edict 6, we have an indirect reference as to how he would spend his time when he was not attending to official business. When a certain Dr Bhandarkar, an Indian scholar, was analysing the information found in Rock Edict 6, he noted that in Emperor Ashoka’s moments of leisure, when he was not asleep, he could be found at his capital either regaling the dining hall or engaging with his wives and concubines. Emperor Ashoka also enjoyed riding his horse or simply passing time in the orchard. From one of his edicts it is known that he even controlled the slaughter of animals by only permitting two peacocks and one deer to be killed for his royal meals. This gives us an idea of the kind of food that gratified his royal palate.

As an Emperor, before his conversion into Buddhism, Ashoka seemed to have done what the rulers of ancient India would do. He entertained his subjects by continuing the tradition of Samajas. The Samajas consisted of entertaining people with a banquet feast with meat dishes. Other Samajas consisted of dancing, music and wrestling, which were performed in an amphitheatre. Hunting was also a big part of the entertainment. According to Nilkanta Sastri, an Indian historian who wrote on South Indian history, these Samajas were unquestionably a diplomatic method of keeping the people pleased and satisfied. However, such Samajas were all stopped after Ashoka embraced Buddhism.

 

RISE TO POWER

According to the Mahavamsa, Ashoka was in Ujjain when he heard the news concerning his father’s ill health and he hurried towards the capital city of Pataliputra. There he killed 99 of his brothers, except the youngest, Tishya in order to become the new emperor. According to one legend, Ashoka was portrayed as a person with a bad temper and wicked nature. He was said to have built “Ashoka’s Hell”, an elaborate torture chamber disguised as a beautiful palace, which earned him the name of Chanda Ashoka (meaning Ashoka the Fierce).

Depiction of Ashoka’s Hell.

Ashoka’s Hell

Historically, there was a four-year gap between Emperor Bindusara’s death in 273 BCE and Emperor Ashoka’s coronation in 269 BCE. This leads historians to believe that Emperor Bindusara’s death led to a power struggle amongst his sons. According to the Divyavadana, Emperor Bindusara wanted his son Susima to succeed him but Ashoka was supported by his father’s ministers, who found Susima to be arrogant and disrespectful towards them. Ashoka managed to rise to the throne with the support of Emperor Bindusara’s ministers, headed by his Chief Minister Radhagupta (also known as Khallataka).

According to several inscriptions, which were erected long after his coronation, Emperor Ashoka referred to his ‘brothers and sisters’ and other relatives for whose welfare he was most concerned. Inscriptional evidence also indirectly suggests that some of his brothers served as his viceroys in important places such as Taxila, Tosali, Ujjayini and Suvaranagiri and what is more, they were addressed as the Kumaras and Aryaputras. According to the Mahavamsa, Ashoka even appointed his youngest brother Tishya as the Uparaja or the Deputy King. Therefore, the Buddhist legends about his cruelty and the killing of his 99 brothers do not seem to possess much historical substance.

 

The Reign of King Ashoka

Ashoka pursued a policy of expansion for the Mauryan Empire, following the ideal of his predecessors. Eight years after ascending the throne, Emperor Ashoka significantly expanded his empire. It grew from the present-day boundaries of Bangladesh and the Indian state of Assam in the east side, to the present-day territories of Afghanistan and Iran in the west. The empire also grew from the Palmir Knots in the north to the most peninsular part of Southern India. This would be recorded as the greatest geographical expansion of the Mauryan Empire.

The Conquests of Chandragupta, Bindusara and Ashoka.

The Conquests of Emperors Chandragupta, Bindusara and Ashoka. Click on image to enlarge.

Despite the mighty size of this Empire which was built by three successive generations of the Mauryan Emperors (i.e., Chandragupta, Bindusara and Ashoka), it did not include a prominent kingdom which was adjacent to the epicentre of the Mauryan Empire (i.e., Magadha or Kalinga). For eight years after the coronation, Emperor Ashoka ruled his empire with an iron fist. He was perceived to be a strong ruler and lived the usual life of a great emperor with pomp, splendour and pleasure. He did not fight external wars, even though he had the power for aggression. He also had no threat or fear of invasion from the Greek kings with whom he had good diplomatic relations dating back to the time of his father.

During the first 12 years of his reign, Emperor Ashoka was occupied with internal administrative work. His position only grew stronger after his coronation. At the time when Emperor Ashoka enjoyed absolute imperial authority, he gained confidence and decided make a move to annex Kalinga. At that time, Emperor Ashoka commanded the largest army of his time consisting of 600,000 infantry, 30,000 cavalry and 9,000 war elephants.

In 265 BCE, Emperor Ashoka waged war against Kalinga, a state that prided itself on its sovereignty and democracy. This war lasted two years between 265 BCE and 263 BCE, and is famously known as the Conquest of Kalinga. The cause and pretext of the war is uncertain but it was most likely purely territorial. Kalinga occupied a strategic position controlling the routes to South India by land and sea. However, there is speculation that his brothers fled to Kalinga and were granted refugee status, which angered Emperor Ashoka greatly. With the advice, support and urging of his ministers, he waged war on Kalinga to take revenge for their treacherous act.

Emperor Ashoka asked Kalinga’s royalty to submit to the Mauryan Empire’s supremacy but they defied him. Emperor Ashoka went on to send one of his generals to force them to submit, but instead his general and his forces were outsmarted and defeated by Kalinga’s leader who was a brilliant and skilled tactician. Emperor Ashoka was shocked and perhaps humiliated by this defeat. In his anger, he launched the greatest invasion ever recorded in Indian history at that time. Kalinga managed to put up a fight, but they were ultimately defeated by Emperor Ashoka’s massive army. The entire kingdom of Kalinga was destroyed and resulted in approximately 100,000 casualties on the Kalinga side, and 10,000 casualties on the Mauryan side. Although this war caused incredible human suffering, it was also Emperor Ashoka’s final war.

 

CONVERSION TO BUDDHISM

The Battle of Kalingga.

The Battle of Kalingga

In his Rock Edict 13, Emperor Ashoka referred to the Conquest of Kalinga and the resulting great loss of lives. The Rock Edict reads, “One hundred and fifty thousand persons were captured, one hundred thousand were killed and many times that number perished.” The destructive nature of the Kalinga war created an emotional shock in Emperor Ashoka. He regretted the fact that he was responsible for so much suffering of fellow human beings. Upon seeing firsthand the damage this war has caused, Emperor Ashoka was deeply regretful and he cried out the famous sentence, “What have I done?”

While Ashoka was this penitent mood, he met the Buddhist monk Upagupta who taught him the Dharma and the teachings touched his heart. He converted to Buddhism and embraced their concept of non-violence, vowing to serve all human beings. This change of heart that Emperor Ashoka experienced was eventually reflected in his internal and foreign policies.

Emperor Ashoka’s decision to abandon the policy of war made it possible for some states in the south to maintain their independence. He then went on to pursue a policy of friendship towards all nations of the time. He used his position as Emperor to spread the relatively new teachings of Buddhism as far as Ancient Rome and Alexandria, Egypt.

Around 260 BCE, Emperor Ashoka declared Buddhism to be the state religion and started the Vibhajyavada School of Buddhism. Vibhajya means ‘dividing or analysing’ and Vada means ‘doctrine or meaning’.

The Vibhajyavadins, meaning “those who make distinctions”, were the followers of Buddhist Schools founded by Emperor Ashoka. They have a strong presence in South India where they called themselves Theravadans. They rejected the claims of Sarvastivada, an earlier school of Buddhism, that all Dharmas exist in the past, present and future. Instead the Vibhajyavadins made a distinction between Dharmas that exist and Dharmas that do not exist. Their standpoints were formulated by Moggaliputtatissa, a Buddhist monk and one of Ashoka’s spiritual teachers. It is also listed in a Buddhist scripture known as Kathavatthu, one of the seven books in the Theravada Abhidhamma Pitaka, which is a branch of Buddhism that uses the teachings of the Pali Canon, also known as the most complete of the early Buddhist canons.

 

ANOTHER VERSION OF EMPEROR ASHOKA’S CONVERSION TO BUDDHISM

Another account of Emperor Ashoka’s conversion to Buddhism is recorded in the Ashokavadana. The text does not refer to the Battle of Kalinga and appears to be more mythical than the previous historical reference. It does, however, contain interesting details about Emperor Ashoka’s practice of Buddhism.

In this text, a Buddhist monk named Samudra appears at what he thought was a palace in Emperor Ashoka’s capital but in reality, it was a new building dedicated to the ‘art of execution’. The young monk, Samudra who was begging for alms became a potential victim of the palace’s guardian, Chandagirika who was to kill whoever stepped through the door. Chandagirika liked to torture and kill, and had already callously dispatched his own parents. Chandagirika agreed to a seven-day delay when the monk Samudra, who feared death, begged him for mercy.

Meanwhile, another youth and one of the women of the royal household caused some offence to Chandagirika, who immediately ordered their execution. He then had their bodies crushed with pestles in an iron mortar before Samudra. While witnessing this horrible execution, Samudra suddenly realised the truth of the Buddha’s teaching of impermanence and became an arhat (liberated being).

The next morning, the time of his execution arrived but Samudra was calm and not afraid. He said to Chandagirika, “True, my night of ignorance has cleared and the sun of my good fortune is at its height. You may do as you wish, my friend.” The executioner was quite unmoved and threw Samudra into a cauldron of water mixed with blood. However, as hard as Chandagirika tried to light a fire underneath the cauldron, it would not light. Looking into the cauldron, he was amazed to see Samudra calmly sitting in the lotus position. He immediately went to find Emperor Ashoka to show him this miracle, together with hundreds of his subjects. Samudra realised that the time had ripened for Emperor Ashoka to receive Buddhist teachings, which the text explains:

Miraculously, Samudra floated up in the air and stunned Ashoka.
For from half his body water poured down;
from the other half fire blazed forth;
Raining and flaming, he shone in the sky.
Ashoka folded his hands and asked to be initiated into the mysteries of the Dharma.

After the event, Emperor Ashoka converted to Buddhism and became a lay-devotee (upasaka). Samudra informed Ashoka that Buddha Shakyamuni had predicted that the Emperor would build 84,000 stupas to contain his bodily relics. He was supposed to fulfil this prophecy but instead, the Emperor had built a Palace of Execution. Emperor Ashoka then begged for forgiveness and took the three refuge vows by which one becomes a Buddhist (Refuge in the Three Jewels – the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha). He also pledged to build stupas to house the Buddha’s sacred relics. Then the monk Samudra vanished.

As Emperor Ashoka was about to leave himself, his executioner challenged him that his boon had not been granted, and that he still had the right to execute the first person who had entered the Palace. Surprised that his servant apparently intended to execute his master, Emperor Ashoka responded that since Chandagirika had in fact entered before him, he was the one who should die. Chandagirika was duly executed and the palace of horrors (described as hell in the text) was destroyed.

The text continues with the story of how Emperor Ashoka recovered the relics from eight stupas that were built previously, and constructed the new stupas as he had promised. On one occasion, in order to earn some merit, he traveled throughout his realm incognito as a mendicant and experienced the lifestyle of a monk. The phrase yam me samghe upeti, which translates as “going to the Sangha”, has led some scholars to claim that Emperor Ashoka was a full-time mendicant but it probably implies that he visited and spent time listening to the monks. It is said that Emperor Ashoka venerated monks and he donated generously to the Sangha.

Both versions of the story regarding Emperor Ashoka’s conversion to Buddhism record that he had a change of heart that involved the repudiation of slaughter, and the development of a commitment to peace and the precepts of Buddhism.

Diodotus I

Diodotus I

Some historians have interpreted Emperor Ashoka’s transformation to be a ruse, and accuse him of being afraid of more war. However, among his neighboring kingdoms including the Seleucid Empire and the Greco-Bactrian kingdom established by Diodotus I, none could match the military strength of the Mauryan Empire. Ashoka reigned during the same period as both Antiochus I Soter and his successor, Antiochus II Theos, of the Seleucid dynasty as well as Diodotus I and his son Diodotus II of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom. His inscriptions and edicts state that he was familiar with the Hellenic world and some of them were even written in Greek, but he was never in awe of this part of the world. His edicts, which talk of his friendly relations, include the names of both Antiochus of the Seleucid Empire and Ptolemy III of Egypt. The Mauryan Empire had been famous since the time Emperor Chandragupta Maurya defeated Selecus Nicator, the founder of the Seleucid Dynasty. Another indication of the relationship between the Mauryan Empire and Greece can be found in the works of Greek historians who wrote about the Empire’s history. As a result of Alexander the Great’s imperial and cultural projects, the Indian and the Hellenic world were now linked.

Emperor Ashoka undoubtedly deserves the credit for making the first serious attempt to develop governmental policies that were based on Buddhist teachings, effectively putting into practice the Buddha’s own advice on kingship and governance that were contained in the Dasa Raja Dharma (Buddhist principles for leaders to abide by), including the following ten precepts :

  • To be liberal and avoid selfishness
  • To be a person of high moral character
  • To be prepared to sacrifice one’s own pleasure for the well-being of one’s subjects
  • To be honest and maintain absolute integrity
  • To be kind and gentle
  • To set an example by leading a simple life for the subjects to emulate
  • To be free from hatred of any kind
  • To exercise non-violent means
  • To practice patience
  • To respect public opinion to promote peace and harmony

Emperor Ashoka published 14 edicts as the basis on his new policies. These are:

  1. No living being was to be slaughtered or sacrificed
  2. Humans and animals were to be provided medical care throughout his territory
  3. Every five years the monks would tour the empire to teach the Dharma
  4. Everyone should respect their parents, priests and monks
  5. Prisoners must be treated humanely
  6. Concerns regarding the welfare of his people must be reported to him at all times no matter where he was or what he was doing
  7. Since all religions desire self-control and purity of heart, everyone is welcome
  8. He preferred to give to monks, Brahmins and to the needy than to receive gifts from others
  9. Reverence for the Dharma and a proper attitude towards teachers is better than marriage or other worldly celebrations
  10. Glory and fame meant nothing if his people did not respect the Dharma
  11. Giving the Dharma to others is the best gift anyone could have
  12. Whoever praises his own religion due to excessive devotion, and condemns others with the thought ‘Let me glorify my own religion’ only harms his own religion. Therefore, contact (between religions) was encouraged
  13. Conquering through the Dharma was superior to conquering by force but if conquest by force was to be carried out, it should be done so with forbearance and light punishment
  14. He had his edicts written so that people might act accordingly

Emperor Ashoka replaced conquest by force with what he called “conquest by righteousness” (dhammavijaya). He was possibly the first emperor to renounce violence, yet he remained an influential and powerful ruler during his reign.

 

THE SPREADING OF BUDDHISM

Emperor Ashoka sent a branch of Bodhi Tree to Ceylon via his daughter, Sanghamitta.

Emperor Ashoka sent a branch of Bodhi Tree to Ceylon via his daughter, Sanghamitta

Emperor Ashoka is mainly remembered in the ancient texts as the patron of Buddhism. His son, Venerable Mahendra, and daughter, Sanghamitta, a nun whose name means ‘friend of the Sangha’, were also proponents of this cause. They established Buddhism in Ceylon (present day Sri Lanka) and took copies of the Pali Canon of Buddhist scripture (the Tipitaka) with them, which was rectified by the 3rd Buddhist Council presided over by their father. Emperor Ashoka built thousands of stupas and Viharas (monasteries / temples) for Buddhist followers. Some of his missionary monks may even have been Greek. One of Emperor Ashoka’s stupas, the Sanchi Stupa, is famous worldwide.

Sanchi Stupa

Sanchi Stupa

Emperor Ashoka pursued a policy of ahimsa (non-violence). He passed laws against hunting animals and branding, effectively ending unnecessary animal slaughter and mutilation. Even though he promoted the concept of vegetarianism, he permitted limited hunting for consumption purposes as a testament to his tolerance for the beliefs of others. He showed mercy to prisoners by allowing them one day of freedom per year. Universities were built to allow everyone, both men and women, to have access to education. He built water transit and irrigation systems to support agriculture and trade. His subjects were treated as equals, regardless of their caste, political views or religion. His neighbouring kingdoms, which he could have easily conquered, were made into allies.

Emperor Ashoka is credited for constructing veterinary hospitals and renovating major roads throughout India. After his transformation, Emperor Ashoka came to be known as Dhammashoka meaning ‘Ashoka, the follower of Dharma’ in Sanskrit. Emperor Ashoka adopted the main principles of the Dharma. These principles suggested a general ethic of behavior to which no religious or social group could object. Indeed, from his 12th edict, Ashoka appears to have pioneered not only inter-religious dialogue but also the concept that all religions share common values which are virtuous.

Mahendra before leaving for Ceylon.

Mahendra before leaving for Ceylon

Besides spreading Buddhist values throughout his own land, Emperor Ashoka also sent missionaries to other countries. According to one of his rock edicts, he sent envoys to various Mediterranean countries such as Syria, Egypt and Macedonia, which were ruled by the Greeks at that time. However, no record exists of the results that these envoys brought.

On the other hand, Ceylon was very receptive to the mission led by Mahendra. Sri Lanka was converted and regarded as the place of the subsequent spread of the Buddhadharma. The Buddhist chronicles kept in Sri Lanka, like the Mahavamsa and Dipavamsa, provide us with information about Ashoka’s life. However with these texts it is less certain where history ends and legend beings, compared to the various edicts. The chronicles tell us that Ashoka sent his son Mahendra and his daughter Sanghamitta to the court of King Tissa of Ceylon. Soon the king and his court were converted to Buddhism and from that time onward, for the last 23 centuries up until the modern day, Buddhism has been practised in Ceylon (today’s Sri Lanka).

Therefore, although Emperor Ashoka’s envoys may have had little effect in the Mediterranean, they found an audience in countries that surround India, including Nepal and Burma, and Buddhism gradually spread to these countries. This was aided by written teachings of the Buddha and his disciples, which were recorded down by the 4th Buddhist Council in Ceylon. From there, Theravada Buddhism spread to Thailand, Cambodia and other countries in Southeast Asia.

Venerable Sanghamitta

Venerable Sanghamitta, who was Ashoka’s daughter

The role that Emperor Ashoka played in spreading Buddhism can not be underestimated. Nuns in Sri Lanka today trace their lineage right back to Emperor Ashoka’s daughter Sanghamitta, and to the retinue of nuns who traveled to Sri Lanka with her. Although the order later became absent for 1000 years in Sri Lanka, it was preserved in Korea and Japan and re-introduced to Sri Lanka within the last century. Sri Lanka thus remains one of the most important Buddhist countries today and is a centre of Buddhist scholarship. If Emperor Ashoka had not put effort to spreading Buddhism beyond India, it might not have survived as it was largely disappearing from India (until its re-emergence in the modern era) with the exception of the area of East Bengal bordering on Burma. Instead, Buddhism spread to China, Japan and beyond. Origen Adamantius, a Greek Christian theologian who spent half of his career in Alexandria, referred to Buddhist missionaries who even visited England. Buddhism on the whole may not have reached China until the 1st CE, but there are stories of one of Emperor Ashoka’s missionaries visiting China. The revival of interest in Buddhism in India has also been attributed to Emperor Ashoka, since the discovery of his edicts helped to stimulate interest.

Buddhist chronicles state that in 250 BCE, Emperor Ashoka personally convened the 3rd Buddhist Council in Pataliputra with two objectives in mind. First, he was responding to reports of heretical views and dissension among the monks in Pataliputra. Emperor Ashoka is said to have interviewed each monk personally and dismissed monks who held beliefs contrary to the Buddha’s teachings, in particular to a belief in an eternal, unchanging self.

Secondly, Emperor Ashoka used this opportunity to appoint knowledgable monks to journey to other lands as emissaries to teach the Dharma. This part of the story is confirmed by the edicts. Buddhist monks like Madhyamik Sthavira were sent to modern-day Kashmir and Afghanistan. Maharaskshit Sthavira was sent to Syria, Persia / Iran, Egypt, Greece, Italy and Turkey. Massim Sthavira travelled to Nepal, Bhutan, China and Mongolia, and Sohn Uttar Sthavira journeyed to modern-day Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Thailand (which was then known as Survarnabhumi) and Vietnam. Mahadharmarakshita Sthavira travelled to Maharashtra and Maharakshita Sthavira and Yavandharmarakshita Sthavira went to South India.

Not all of these missions were successful. For example, Buddhism did not take root in Thailand or Burma until a few more centuries after the 3rd Council was convened. However, the missions to Greece and Egypt may have had some interesting effects. Scholars have long noted some blending of Hellenic and Buddhist thought that began about that time. There is also some archaeological evidence of Buddhists living in Alexandria.

 

SYMBOLS AND ARCHITECTURE

The Ashoka Chakra, ‘the Wheel of Righteousness’. Click on image to enlarge.

The Ashoka Chakra, ‘the Wheel of Righteousness’. Click on image to enlarge.

The Ashoka Chakra (the wheel of Ashoka) is a depiction of the Dharmachakra (the Wheel of Dharma). The wheel has 24 spokes which represent the 12 Laws of Dependent Origination and the 12 Laws of Dependent Termination. The Ashoka Chakra has been widely inscribed on many relics of the Mauryan Emperor, most prominent among which is The Lion Capital of Sarnath and The Ashoka Pillar. The most visible use of the Ashoka Chakra today is at the centre of the National Flag of the Republic of India (adopted on 22th July 1947), where it is rendered as navy-blue in color on a white background. This replaces Chakra symbol (spinning wheel) of the pre-independence versions of the flag. The Ashoka Chakra can also been seen on the base of the Lion Capital of Emperor Ashoka which has been adopted as the National Emblem of India.

The Ashoka Chakra was created by Emperor Ashoka during his reign. Chakra is a Sanskrit word which also means ‘cycle’ or ‘self-repeating process’. The process it signifies is the cycle of time – how the world changes with time.

A few days before India became independent in August 1947, the specially formed Constituent Assembly decided that the flag of India must be acceptable to all parties and communities. A flag with three colours, saffron, white and green with the Ashoka Chakra was selected.

Pillars of Ashoka (Ashokstambha).

Pillars of Ashoka (Ashokstambha)

The pillars of Ashoka are a series of columns erected by Ashoka during his reign. Their locations are dispersed throughout the northern Indian subcontinent. Originally, there must have been many Ashokan pillars although only 10 with inscriptions survive to this day. Averaging between 40 and 50-ft in height, and weighing up to 50 tons each, all the pillars were excavated in Chunar, just south of Varanasi and transported, sometimes hundreds of miles, to the place where they were erected. The first Ashokan Pillar was found in the 16th Century by Thomas Coryat among the ruins of ancient Delhi. The wheel represents the cycle of time and Buddhist law, while the swastika stands for the cosmic dance around a fixed centre and acted as guardian against evil.

Lion Capital of Ashoka (Ashokmudra).

Lion Capital of Ashoka (Ashokmudra)

The Lion Capital of Ashoka is a sculpture of four lions standing back to back. It was originally placed on top of the Ashokan Pillar in Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, India. The pillar, sometimes called the Ashoka Column is still in its original location, but the Lion Capital is now placed in the Sarnath Museum. This Lion Capital was adopted as the National Emblem of India. The Sarnath Pillar contained one of the Edicts of Emperor Ashoka, an inscription against division within the Buddhist community, which reads “No one shall cause division in the order of monks”.

The Capital contains the image of four lions (Indian / Asiatic Lions), standing back to back, mounted on an abacus, with a frieze carrying sculptures in high relief of an elephant, a galloping horse, a bull, and a lion, separated by intervening spoked chariot-wheels over a bell-shaped lotus. Carved out of a single block of polished sandstone, the capital was believed to be crowned by a Dharmachakra.

The four animals in the Sarnath capital are believed to symbolise different stages of Buddha Shakyamuni’s life:

  • The elephant represents the Buddha’s birth in reference to the dream of Queen Maya of a white elephant entering her womb
  • The bull represents desire during the life of the Buddha as a prince
  • The horse represents Buddha’s departure from palatial life
  • The lion represents the accomplishment of Buddha

In addition to religious interpretations, there are some non-religious interpretations regarding these symbols. According to these, the four lions symbolise Emperor Ashoka’s rule over the four directions, the wheels as symbols of his enlightened rule (Chakravartin) and the four animals as symbols of the four adjoining territories of India.

 

STRUCTURES CREDITED TO ASHOKA

Mahabodhi Temple, built on the site of a previously built temple by Emperor Ashoka (c. 250 BCE) to mark the spot of Buddha Shakyamuni’s enlightenment was restored by the British and Indian governments. The British restoration was executed under guidance from Weligama Sri Sumangala.

Mahabodhi Temple

Mahabodhi Temple

Other structures built by Ashoka include:

  • Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh, India
  • Dhamek Stupa, Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Barabar Caves, Bihar, India
  • Nalanda Mahavihara, (some portions like Sariputta Stupa), Bihar, India
  • Taxila University, (some portions like Dharmarajika Stupa and Kunala Stupa), Taxila, Pakistan
  • Bhir Mound, (reconstructed), Taxila, Pakistan
  • Bharhut stupa, Madhya Pradesh, India
  • Deorkothar Stupa, Madhya Pradesh, India
  • Butkara Stupa, Swat, Pakistan
  • Sannati Stupa, Karnataka, India: The only known sculptural depiction of Emperor Ashoka
  • Mir Rukun Stupa Nawabshah, Pakistan

 

DEATH AND LEGACY

Emperor Ashoka reigned for an estimated 40 years and after his death, the Mauryan Dynasty lasted for just 50 more years. Emperor Ashoka had many wives and children but except for a few, many of them remain obscure in history. He had entrusted to Mahendra and Sanghamitta the task of spreading Buddhism in Ceylon, making them famous across the world.

The reign of Emperor Ashoka could easily have disappeared into obscurity as the ages passed by, if he had not left behind a record of his edicts. The testimony of this wise emperor are embodied magnificently in sculpted pillars and boulders with a variety of teachings intricately etched into the stone. What Emperor Ashoka left behind was the first written language in India since the ancient city of Harappa. Rather than Sanskrit, the language used for the inscriptions was the current spoken form of Prakrit.

In addition to his legacy as the first Buddhist emperor and one of the pioneers of an alternative approach to governance, Emperor Ashoka was an efficient administrator. His empire was divided into five provinces, with major cities at Taxila, Ujjain, Tosali, Suvarnagiri and Patilaputra. A Kumara (prince) governed each province. These were sub-divided into groups of several villages. Each village was headed by a Gramika. At the centre, Ministers of State (Mantris) dealt with judiciary matters and taxation. Emperor Ashoka issued Sasanasad (ordinances), and listened to people’s concerns and consulted not only his ministers but common people as well. He was very concerned that fair justice was carried out and during his rule, he made the system much more open than it had been before. Death sentences were commuted to life imprisonment and were open to appeal. He wrote:

“I even go this far, to grant a three-day stay for those in prison who have been tried and sentenced to death. During this time their relatives can make appeals to have the prisoners’ lives spared. If there is none to appeal on their behalf, the prisoners can give gifts in order to make merit for the next world, or observe fasts.” (Pillar Edict 4)

Public funds were spent on major projects, including agriculture to feed the poor, to dig wells, and also to plant trees so that people could benefit from the shade they gave in the hottest conditions. Art and culture flourished (both show signs of Greek and Persian influence) and both were conscripted to help the spread of Buddhism. He also provided free medical care for people and animals.

The Chinese scholar Faxian traveled to India in search of great Buddhist books of discipline between 399 – 414 CE. Whilst in India, he reported seeing works of art, rock caves, palaces and exemplary buildings from Emperor Ashoka’s period. From this he concluded that there must have been a very sophisticated civil service. A characteristic of Mauryan art was the mirror-like finish to the pillars, which has survived centuries of exposure to wind and sun.

Emperor Ashoka combined personal and state ethics and tried to bridge the divides in his multi-cultural empire. He wrote, “You are true to your own belief is you accord kindly treatments to adherents of other faiths. You ham you own religion by harassing followers of other creeds” (Emperor Ashoka, Rock Edict 3).

He believed that his code of reverence and compassion was based on universal values. His 14-point code was aimed for both inner morality and outer action in harmony. He turned away from kingship based on power, compulsion and self-interest, and dared to believe that he could construct a different kind of kingdom based on causing no one harm. It has been suggested that no greater or better kingdom has yet been known amongst men. In Kalinga Rock Edict One, he instructed his judicial officers, warning them that they would not be promoted unless they furthered his desire:

“All men are my children. What I desire for my own children, and I desire their welfare and happiness both in this world and the next, that I desire for all men. You do not understand to what extent I desire this, and if some of you do understand, you do not understand the full extent of my desire.”

Emperor Ashoka’s policy of non-violence was also revived during the independence struggle against the British, by the nationalist leader and Hindu philosopher Mahatma Gandhi. In addition, when India finally gained independence from the British Empire in 1947, it symbolically adopted Emperor Ashoka’s emblem for its own, placing the Dharmachakra that crowned his many columns on the flag of the newly independent state of India.

But his contribution towards Buddhism itself is perhaps the most substantial one of all. In India, Emperor Ashoka essentially turned Buddhism from a tradition into an official state ideology. It was due to his support that Buddhism transformed from being a local Indian cult into a world religion, which today has an estimated 470 million followers according to the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs. It was through his deeds and action that Buddhism spread outside of India and began its long transformation to becoming one of the world’s greatest religions. Indeed the world owes Emperor Ashoka for his contribution in making Buddhism into what it is today.

 

THE FATE OF THE MAURYAN EMPIRE AND INDIA POST ASHOKA

The Brahman priests who had been sidelined by Emperor Ashoka’s Buddhist policies, encouraged civil war by working to undermine his policies. Emperor Ashoka’s time had been one of unification, bringing small kingdoms together, but sadly, it was followed by a time of fragmentation.

In the year 185 CE, about 50 years after Ashoka’s death, the last Mauryan ruler, Brihadratha, was brutally murdered by the commander of the Mauryan army, Pusyamitra Sunga, while he was taking the Guard of Honor of his forces. Pusyamitra Sunga then founded the Sunga Dynasty (185 – 78 CE) and ruled just a small part of the Mauryan Empire. The empire’s decline is mainly attributable to the weak leadership that succeeded Ashoka’s rule. Several other factors also contributed to the decline of the Mauryan Empire, including the downsizing of the military, who lost their jobs under Emperor Ashoka’s policy of non-violence and were subsequently unable to offer adequate defence. The large administration required strong leadership and when this was not forthcoming, provinces tended to assert independence from the central government.

It would not be until some 2000 years later, under Akbar the Great and his great-grandson Aurangzeb, that a large portion of the Indian subcontinent would again be united under a single ruler.

 

BUDDHISM TODAY

Buddhism has approximately 470 million followers across the globe. It represents a major component of the spiritual heritage of East and Southeast Asia. The two main branches of Buddhism are Mahayana and Theravada. Mahayana Buddhism is practiced by around 185 million people and is the dominant form of Buddhism in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Vietnam. Theravada Buddhism has about 125 million followers and is dominant in Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Sri Lanka and Burma. Another significant strand of Buddhism related to the Mahayana is Tibetan Buddhism, which is practiced by 20 million people largely in Tibet, Bhutan, Mongolia, and surrounding areas in India, China and Russia. Buddhism is a growing spiritual influence in the West, and many new religious movements are affiliated with Buddhism, especially in Japan and Korea.
Sources:

  • http://nationalviews.com/samrat-bindusara-wives-sons-facts-history
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashoka
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bindusara
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subhadrangi
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susima
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashokavadana
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalinga_War
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origen
  • https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faxian
  • http://www.ancient.eu/Ashoka/
  • http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Ashoka
  • http://classroom.synonym.com/did-buddhism-begin-spread-outside-india-during-mauryan-empire-5860.html
  • http://buddhism.about.com/od/theemperorashoka/
  • http://buddhism.about.com/od/theemperorashoka/fl/The-Emperor-Ashoka-Patron-of-Buddhism.htm
  • http://www.historydiscussion.net/biography/ashoka/biography-of-ashoka-early-life-kalinga-war-and-reforms/5717
  • http://www.historydiscussion.net/history-of-india/asokas-early-life-and-his-accession-to-throne/2417
  • http://www.importantindia.com/7096/bindusara-maurya/
  • http://www.importantindia.com/9193/early-life-of-asoka-the-great-devanampriya-priyadarshi/
  • http://www.importantindia.com/9480/short-biography-of-ashoka-the-great/
  • https://www.quora.com/Did-King-Ashoka-killed-his-brothers-How-many-brothers-he-had
  • http://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/ashoka-6226.php
  • http://www.iloveindia.com/history/ancient-india/maurya-dynasty/ashoka.html
  • https://www.cs.colostate.edu/~malaiya/ashoka.html
  • https://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/essays/demographics-of-buddhism

 

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30 Responses to Emperor Ashoka the Great

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  1. Tsa Tsa Ong on Nov 2, 2018 at 10:22 pm

    It is very inspiring that such a influencial person like Emperor Ashoka was convinced by the teaching of Buddha and converted into a Buddhist. With his governmental policies that were based on Buddhist teachings, the people and even animals under the reign of his empire had benefitted greatly because of him following the non-violent way of Buddhisim. Thank you Rinpoche and blog team for such an interesting write up👍🙏😍👏

  2. Choong on Sep 24, 2017 at 10:30 am

    From: Buddhism in Mongolia: Three or Five Waves of Cultural Blossoming
    By Glenn Mullin

    According to the Origins of Dharma in the Hor Regions by the great Mongolian scholar Lobsang Tamdrin, Buddhism came to the Hor region in three waves.

    1.The first Mongolian Buddhist wave began in the third century B.C., during the time of the Indian Emperor Ashoka, three centuries before Buddhism took root in China, and some eight centuries before it became firmly established in Tibet. Traditionally Mongolians recognize their second highest incarnate lama, Zaya Pandita, as being an emanation of Emperor Ashoka, perhaps in honor of this early connection.

    According to Lobsang Tamdrin, Ashoka extended his empire northward all the way to the Silk Road, and eventually captured the city of Khotan. Khotan was the westernmost region of Hor, and thus in Lobsang Tamdrin’s eyes was part of Mongolia. Emperor Ashoka was a strong Buddhist, and actively promoted Buddhism as the national religion of all lands under his rule.

    From Khotan Buddhism gradually spread eastward to the Mongolian Gobi kingdoms along the Silk Road. Lobsang Tamdrin comments that Hor supported a population of over 100,000 Buddhist monks even in these ancient days.

    Cave paintings along the Hor section of the Silk Road certainly bear witness to an early Mongol enthusiasm for Buddhism. The cave paintings in Dung Huang of modern-day China are an excellent example. Dung Huang at the time was part of the Mongolian patchwork of kingdoms. It was conquered by the Tibetan emperor Songtsen Gampo in the seventh century A.D., reverted to Mongolia under Chinggis Khan.

  3. Datuk May on Apr 28, 2017 at 5:54 pm

    This is truly a very inspiring story of King Ashoka the Great, a King who changed from a warrior who killed and conquered and created a huge empire to that of a Buddhist who also did great things like building 84,000 stupas and propagating the Dharma.

    It is because of King Ashoka who brought Buddhism to many lands outside of India that now we have the opportunity to practise Buddhist.

    I also read that it was during the time of King Ashoka that the relics of Shakyamuni Buddha were sent to other countries to share the blessings of the Buddha and many stupas were built to house these relics.

  4. freon on Nov 30, 2016 at 12:14 am

    Normally to rulers who dare to let go of violence and rule with compassion is very rare. Emperor Ashoka has ruled his kingdom by using Dharma concept. By reading the article, I can even feel the harmony and peace that this Emperor has gave for his subjects. He is great, to me because he dare to practice compassion and equanimity in his reign.
    Emperor Ashoka has treated the animals well. He promoted vegetarian, less hunting and he had medical care for animal at his time ! To me, this is the first Emperor that has medicine to treat the animal.
    For prisoner, Emperor Ashoka will give chances to the prisoner to collect merit, for the prisoner future life!

    His children have also play an important role in spreading the dharma. By reading this article, only I knew that the Nun System was established by his daughter name Sanghamitta

    It is so lucky to have a leader like Emperor Ashoka who apply dharma in his leadership. If the world have many leaders that apply more spiritual knowledge into their countries, there would not be war, but, more peace, harmony in this world.

  5. Wan Wai Meng on Nov 28, 2016 at 1:29 am

    We do owe King Ashoka for all the work he had done to bring Buddhism to the world, without his work buddhism could have just remained in India and might have become extinguished in the land of its birth if it was not spread to other parts of the world.

    His story also draws parellels to the story of Kang Xi, who grew up in political intrigue, but managed to overcome people who wanted to harm his claim to the throne, despite being young age. Both of them were very capable administrators and rulers, it is right they are remembered for their works in bringing the dharma to many during their lifetime.

  6. Sock Wan on Oct 1, 2016 at 4:54 pm

    Similarly to Tang or Qing Dynasty, when the ruler adopt Buddhist practice, the development of the country, sentiments of the citizen seemed to be at its best. Buddhist philosophy believes everything on earth, in the universe are interdependent, interrelated, we must respect each other in order to create harmony and balance in our community. When we start to hurt each other, taking revenge, full of anger, we lose the balance, we lose the harmony, there will be no peace.

    King Ashoka also demonstrated to us as long as we are regretful and remorse for the wrongs we have done, we would be able to make it up. We cannot turn back the time to make our wrongs right, but we can do the right things to make up the wrongs we have done.

  7. shelly tai on Oct 1, 2016 at 12:25 pm

    This is really a inspiring post to read , from a vicious ruler to a very compassionate ruler that benefits many sentient beings, what more important is the Dharma that preserved by him up till today.

  8. Albert on Sep 29, 2016 at 9:05 am

    This is a really classic story to read, King Ashoka, someone who kill his brothers, kill thousands of people and never need to consider twice, in order to get what he want, he will never hesitate to kill, but for someone who is so cruel and cold can change 180 degree because of Dharma, he listen to it, applied and totally change the whole situation, peace was created and many people’s life was spare from it.

    Because of King Ashoka’s implementation of Buddhism in India, it get to spread to around the world and benefited people till today’s world. This story of King Ashoka also told us that no matter what we have done previously, it is not permanent, it doesn’t mean we are forever a bad person, as long as we willing to change and amend what is wrong, we can still be a better person and work to the benefit of others, this seems to be hard, but it is possible.

    Thank you Prashant for sharing such inspiring story with us.

  9. Pastor Chia on Sep 29, 2016 at 8:41 am

    Is interesting reading King Ashoka life story and know how he from the warrior king using buddhism to rule his country. Despite through the war by killing thousand and thousand people. King Asoka after met buddhism regret he action had done by killing so many people through the war.Building thousand and thousand stupa is powerful way of purification from his negative karma. The most important how King Asoka implemented buddhist teaching to rule his empire become peace and harmony instate or using violent way cause many harm and suffering. king Ashoka contribution to promote buddhism benefited many people study dharma over century even he had pass away thousand over year until now.

  10. Julia Tan on Sep 29, 2016 at 1:06 am

    The King is always the most powerful and influential one. Hence the fortune of the people strongly depend on how the King rule his country. Being the emperor of India, with so much of power, he had killed many due to greed and anger. Fortunately, he realised his downfall and regret greatly, hence he transformed himself to become a Dharma king and rule the country base on Buddha’s teaching ever after. He reminded me of the Emperor of China Kangxi whom brought tremendous benefit to the people of China.

    One with power can destroy everything. One with power also can unite and benefits all.

  11. Mingwen on Sep 29, 2016 at 12:49 am

    “One hundred and fifty thousand persons were captured, one hundred thousand were killed and many times that number perished.” The destructive nature of the Kalinga war created an emotional shock in Emperor Ashoka. He regretted the fact that he was responsible for so much suffering of fellow human beings. Upon seeing firsthand the damage this war has caused, Emperor Ashoka was deeply regretful and he cried out the famous sentence, “What have I done?”

    A Chinese’s well known quote, “放下屠刀, 立地成佛” which means Slaughter would stop killing and motivated to become a Buddha.

    It’s okay and we have always tend to make wrong moves throughout our lives and regret later. What’s really matter is we do learn a lesson and transform into a version of ourselves after every mistake we did.

  12. Pastor Antoinette on Sep 29, 2016 at 12:06 am

    King Ashoka the Great’s story shows again how someone extremely brutal, selfish and cruel like this warrier can turn around and become someone who spreads Dharma to innumerable amount of people.

    During his reign Buddhism spread so much and it become an official state ideology, the beginning of a world religion. King Ashoka’s legacy is indeed amazing. He helped his people in an extraordinary way we providing free medical care for his people and even for animals. His government helped to feed the poor through farming, digged wells and even planted trees to provide shade.

    Thank you for this amazing historic account.

  13. June Kang on Sep 28, 2016 at 11:46 pm

    读阿育王的故事,我很敬佩他把佛法用在治理国家,阿育王在位37年间,不仅统一全印度,他广泛宣传佛教教义和宗教道德, 他大力宣扬佛教慈悲思想,禁止杀。

    阿育王为了驱除了外道,举行第三次结集,由王与七十二高龄的目犍连子帝须亲临主持,整理了经典,并编撰了“论事”。

    阿育王宣传佛教的最得力的方式是广建佛塔,然而阿育王对佛教的贡献远远不止于此,他的奉行正法,也可说是佛陀遗教的一种实践。重要的是阿育王所做的种种佛教事业是促进了佛教在社会各阶层中的广泛传播,也为佛教走向世界打开了通道。更重要的是,印度在阿育王的统治下是空前的繁荣,这证明了佛法也可以用来“治国平天下”。

  14. nicholas on Sep 28, 2016 at 11:37 pm

    Ashoka indeed contributed in a wide spread of Buddhism in many parts of the world. The effect after the war had made him realised and the turn around of him improve the situation alot. He even attempt to develop governmental policies that based on Buddhist teaching which this is a direct governance to his people. With his enthusiasm which also followed by his childrens that had made a great established Buddhism in other country which we can see it today.

    What I admire about Ashoka is he can govern his empire under non-violance policy and follow through the Buddhism precept. His contribution in Buddhism even spread beyond by sending knowledgable monk to teach in other country. Ashoka indeed had left a great marked in spreading Buddhism from India.

  15. Eric kksiow on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:46 pm

    The emperor Ashoka is considered to be one of India’s greatest monarchs, he is widely remembered as a Buddhist ruler, and it was his contributions to Buddhism and morality that made him such a renowned figure in Indian history.

    Thank You
    Eric kksiow

  16. Khoo Hou Haw on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:39 pm

    It is very inspiring that such a influencial person like Ashoka was convinced by the teaching of Buddha and converted into a Buddhist. With his governmental policies that were based on Buddhist teachings, the people and even animals under the reign of his empire had benefitted greatly because of him following the non-violent way of Buddhisim. Another great person, Mahatma Ghandi who followed his way of non-violent again brought peace to the people of India. Imagine how much benefits can sentient being receive if everyone practise dharma.

  17. Li Kheng on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:24 pm

    Wow, Ashoka is truly a great conqueror. He first conquered land to gain power, wealth and status but later he conquered his own mind. That is the greatest of his conquest. From a King who could instigate and fuel the disastrous Kalinga war that killed and harmed hundreds of thousands, King Ashoka was able to regret and take actions to heal the suffering he caused and ultimately benefit lives beyond his own lifetime.

    This is a reflection of the power of pure Dharma. It is so accurate and irrefutably true that even the mind of a feared and “indestructible” king like ashoka could be transformed.

    king Ashoka’s conversion to Buddhism continue to benefit mankind in modern history as it is through his contribution that buddhism continue to spread into societies in the day and age across oceans in various continents.

    Thank you for sharing such an ancient legacy. The efforts of compiling facts and data of such a historical figure is certainly no easy feat!

  18. Pastor Henry Ooi on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:18 pm

    One man, that’s all it takes to create history. But a special man, with passion, vision, determination, wisdom, effort, love, compassion. Similar to the Buddha and other great men in history, Emperor Ashoka left a legacy. And what a legacy. If not for him, Buddhism might have taken a much longer time to reach other lands outside of India. Today, 470 million Buddhists are grateful to this great Indian Emperor for his great compassion.

  19. pammie yap on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:11 pm

    Very good and detailed write up on King Ashoka. There were so many ‘dramatic’ events in his life! All the killings and torturing was really scary to read about. But the best part is how he went through all the dramas that eventually led him to Buddhism. And from there, he practiced and did the best he can spreading Buddhism beyond India and also got his children to do the same which resulted in Buddhism surviving in a few countries and practiced widely.
    This shows that no matter how cruel someone can be, with the correct teachings and guidance, Buddhism can help and change our mind for better as what we can see here with King Ashoka.

  20. Moh Mei on Sep 28, 2016 at 10:03 pm

    Pastor Henry pointed out during our discussion, history is usually created by one person. It is true though, we often remember that one great leader, that one famous actor, that one genius scientist, that one Lama, etc. History seldom remember the whole nation, the community, the company, the team or the crew.

    No doubt Ashoka was a great king. As a king one holds the power to do great many things but somethings the same position can also become a restriction. It is rare for a person of such stature as king to change religion or beliefs. Leaders have been known to perish from power when they attempt to do so.

    Ashoka’s conversion to Buddhism and his commitment in dharma after left a permanent impact in history.

  21. Jace Chong on Sep 28, 2016 at 9:58 pm

    Thanks Rinpoche, P.Prashant and the blog team for the extensive information about Ashoka.

    I first heard about Ashoka was in Bodhgaya near Maha Bodhi Stupa, there is an Ashoka Pillar there and I got to know about the story of Ashoka through the tour guide when he is explaining about the pillar.

    I still remember clearly that he said Ashoka was in the great war of Kalinga, Ashoka and his troops killed hundred thousands of people. After the was, Ashoka was very thirsty, he asked his soldier to bring him some water to drink. The soldier brought him a cup of blood and Ashoka asked why. The soldier said there was no water he can find, even the river has became blood river because there were so many people died. The Kalinga war was a great turning point for Ashoka to realize “What have I done.”

    I admire his ruling policy adapting Buddhism and make Buddhist teachings very practical to everyone. However it didn’t last long. Nonetheless, the life story of Ashoka reflects that no matter how much bad deeds one did, there’s chance for him/her to turn around, to connect to our true self, to practice kindness, compassion and wisdom from the Buddha.

    Thank you.

  22. Bradley Kassian on Aug 28, 2016 at 1:09 am

    I really think people haven’t considered how crucial this individual is in preserving and increasing the Dharma far and wide. It is from people like him that Buddha Dharma really took hold across India & the rest of Asia in various countries, and although he did send scholars and monks westward the impact there was much less but there are records that some monks made it to Alexandria in Egypt. I personally believe some Buddhist teachings heavily influenced early Christianity since the teachings did make it to Israel and the surrounding areas. Ashoka the Great was a prolific builder, and supporter of Buddhism. Ajatashatru the King of Magadha had a great impact in the preservation of the teachings for future generations but it was Emperor Ashoka who helped spread them. His immense influence can still be felt across Asia and now the world.

  23. Sheila on Aug 26, 2016 at 2:17 am

    A very informative and entertaining read. We know too well Ashoka was the greatest Indian ruler, but I had no idea about the extent of his contributions to spread Buddhism all over the world.
    I especially enjoyed reading about how he interpreted Buddhism as a method of governance.
    Looking forward to another thought provoking read.

  24. Paul Yap on Aug 25, 2016 at 11:22 pm

    King Ashoka has transformed from a cruel, fierce ruler to a kind, compassionate and generous Buddhist practitioner. Over time, he has build many Buddhist temples and holy sites, he also rules his country with Buddhist principles. Its amazing when one’s who guided properly, the mind could change for better, thus benefited millions of peoples for the better.

  25. Pastor KH Ng on Aug 25, 2016 at 2:05 pm

    Emperor Ashoka the Great is widely credited to be the person most responsible for spreading Buddhism outside of India, especially the Therevadan tradition via Ceylon. Without the him, Buddhism would not be what it is today.

    In my mind Emperor Ashoka was a Chakravartin King or Universal Emperor consistent with what are described in the Buddhist texts. He showed us what is wrong; killing, violence, self pleasure; and what is right; compassion, love and tolerance; even while being a King; and normally a king will “need” to act in contrary to those benevolent values in order to rule. This is the outstanding different of Emperor Ashoka and other great rulers in history and he is unique in this way with the exception of Emperor Kangxi of Qing China.

  26. Stella Cheang on Aug 24, 2016 at 10:19 pm

    It is an exhilarating read about King Ashoka. The Kalinga War is quite widely known, and from here in this article, we are brought to face with the brutality of King Ashoka before he became a true devotee of Buddhism. The virtuous deeds through King Ashoka’s proliferation of Buddha Dharma actually stayed longer and deeper in the heart of many compared to his callous history. Two thousand over years after his passing, many Buddhism artifacts like the Pillars of Ashoka and Lion Capital of Ashoka are still being revered as the symbol of an integral and inseparable part of history of India. Thank you P. Prashant for this interesting article.

  27. Fong on Aug 24, 2016 at 7:49 pm

    Ashoka was indeed a very great ruler. From being a vengeful, violent warrior ruler to a compassionate and tolerant ruler. The list of his accomplishment is longer than my arm.

    Though he had a change of heart that involved the repudiation of slaughter, and the development of a commitment to peace and the precepts of Buddhism, he did not force anyone to complete change to fit into his new believes.

    What struck me most is that he sent his children out to other parts of the world to spread Buddhism. If not for that, Buddhism might have declined in India with the Mauryan empire.

    Thank you, for a very informative and interesting read.

  28. Pastor David Lai on Aug 23, 2016 at 12:48 am

    Wow! What a good article. It left a lingering feeling of awe and nostalgia after reading it. I like how the article was written based on very believable hypothesis that was derived from excavated stone carved edicts.

    I love the story, the legend and the origin of Ashoka and the dramatic transformation from a war-mongering to a peace-loving emperor. There were plenty of details within the story that pulled Ashoka off from the history books into a seamless story. It is pretty obvious that from Ashokan’s reign that Buddhism gradually became mainstream all over.

  29. Joy on Aug 19, 2016 at 1:19 am

    This is a truly interesting account on King Ashoka. Thank you P. Prashant for this wonderful detailed historical write up. Every Buddhist ought to know this story of the fist Buddhist King who ruled his Kingdom with Dharma! Being the first emperor to renounce violence, replacing conquest by force with what he called “conquest by righteousness”. But what truly struck me the most was that He was not all that goody goody and holy.

    Before He became a Buddhist, he was known to be a fierce, shrewd, power hungry King. He slaughtered hundreds of thousands of people, and his last battle known as Battle of Kalinga, and it is from this blood shed war, did it dawn on to him the intense suffering he caused, which made him transform himself due to much regret. This is a story of a great King which can resonate with many of us who are still stuck in our bad habits. It is inspiring because it shows that if we are truly sincere and feel regret and remorse for what we have done, and seek refuge and apply the Dharma, we are able to achieve great things. It is because of King Ashoka’s deeds and action that Buddhism managed to spread outside of India, and the rest is history! We owe much to King Ashoka for the spread of Buddhism and I am amazed how much he did after that. Now I know the signiicance of the Mahaboddhi Temple and the person who built it! Thank you!

  30. Sofi on Aug 18, 2016 at 10:41 pm

    Thank you P. Prashant for such an interesting article. I had heard of this great Emperor but mostly with reference to the bloodbath of Kalinga war. I had also gone on pilgrimage to where some of Ashoka’s pillars and stupas still stand. However this article really brought to life the history of Mauryan Empire and Emperor Ashoka. He certainly stands out as a well loved Emperor with his caring governance towards his people, even prisoners on death sentence. He proofed that governance with accordance to Buddhist tenets need not be weak. In fact it is the opposite as citizens were happy with his fair rule and neighbours based on diplomatic friendliness are content with status quo. Emperor Ashoka had ruled his people with firmness but wisely and with plenty of care.

    With this in mind, I wish that the Dalai Lama and CTA will emulate the policies of Emperor Ashoka in their governance and religious edict. Acceptance of another’s religious practise was norm and Emperor Ashoka was respectfully considerate, right down to their food intake. The Dalai Lama and CTA should respect the Protector Dorje Shugden practitioners and accord them the respect as those of other religions. When will they wake up to proclaim “What have I done” and lift the illogical ban on Dorje Shugden?

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  • Sofi
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 05:39 PM
    He Rejected A $37 Million Contract To Do What?

    Wow, imagine someone rejecting USD37 millions! Don’t you just wonder why did he and for what? Must by such a strong conviction about something. Did he regret his decision?

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/inspiration-worthy-words/he-rejected-the-37-million-contract-to-do-what.html
  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 12:40 PM
    Mr. Randy Pauch was very ill when he gave his last speech to the audience. In his speech, he had shared with us a few important points on how to be successful and happy.
    1. Always be appreciative and grateful to the people and things we have. In return, good things will happen to us.
    2. Don’t complain, because complaining does not solve the problems.
    3. When we are sorry for the mistakes we have made, we must do something to make it up. By just saying sorry is not enough.
    4. Be humble and not to react to the negative actions of others towards us.
    5. Be persistent and don’t give up easily. It took Mr. Randy 15 years to make his dream of working at Disney come true.
    6. Death is uncertain and it is beyond our control. We can choose to face death with a positive attitude so when we die, there will be no regret.
    7. Be honest and have integrity, it is hard to do but if we can do that, we will be truly happy and live our lives without regret.

    Mr. Randy had shown us that death is uncertain and we don’t have control over it. However, we have a choice on how we want to live our lives. We are in control of our own happiness. If we have positive thinking, we will be able to turn a negative situation into something positive and then learn and become a better person.

    http://bit.ly/TR-LiveHappy
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 11:57 AM
    There are four holy mountains in China, Mount Jiu Hua, Mount Wutai, Mount Emei and Mount Putuo. Mount Wutai is believed to be the abode of Buddha Manjushri, Mount Emei is believed to be the abode of Samantabhadra, Mount Putuo is believed to be the abode of Guan Yin (Avalokiteshvara) and Mount Jiu Hua is believed to be the abode of Ksitigarbha.

    Mount Jiu Hua is located in Qingyang County, Anhui Province in China, the highest peak being the Shiwang Peak (Peak of Ten Kings), at 1,342 metres above sea level. There are many temples on Mount Jiu Hua, the oldest and holiest one is called Huangcheng temple. A Korean prince called Jin Qiaojue engaged in a 75-year-long solitary practice and achieved enlightenment at the age of 99 when he passed away.

    http://bit.ly/TR-HolyMountain
    [no sender]
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 11:42 AM
    Wow ……..outstanding colour art painting of Four-Armed Chenrezig and Dorje Shugden. Beautiful thangka to have it on altar or in our home. Merely looking at it tells a thousand words. Its truly a blessing.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-one-who-saves-four-armed-chenrezig
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 11:41 AM
    Beautiful art paintings of Buddha of Power: Vajrapani and Dorje Shugden who is an emanation of the Buddha of Wisdom, Manjushri. Vajrapani is a Bodhisattva who represents the energy of the enlightened mind and energy that breaks through delusion. He dances wildly within a halo of flames, which represent the transformative power of Awakening.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing with a simple explanations for us to understand.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-buddha-of-power-vajrapani
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 11:40 AM
    Hayagriva Is an extremely wrathful emanation of Amitabha and Chenrezig and Vajravarahi. Making prayers to Hayagriva is a swift and powerful means to overcome negative forces and obstacles including those caused by spirit harms. Its also beneficial to those who suffered from illnesses. A very powerful practice in the tradition of Kyerkangpa who received the practice from Guru Rinpoche in a dream. Beautiful thangka.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/tamer-of-nagas-hayagriva-sangdrup
  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Apr 25. 2019 11:25 AM
    There are 3 Dharma Kings in Tibet. First Dharma King was Songtsen Gampo. His 2 wives from Nepal and China are said to be the emanations of Tara. Due to their influence, King Songtsen Gampo became an enthusiastic promoter of the Dharma in Tibet. The second Dharma King was King Trisong Detsen, he invited great Indian masters Padmasambhava and Shantarakshita to Tibet to spread the Dharma. He also constructed the first Buddhist monastery, Samye Monastery in Tibet and orchestrated the ordination of the first 7 Tibetan Sangha members. There are many good deeds King Trisong Detsen had performed in spreading the Dharma in Tibet, click here to read more:

    http://bit.ly/DharmaKing
    [no sender]
  • Sofi
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 11:21 PM
    Neerja Bhanot – A Selfless Heroine

    She may be gone but she should not be forgotten for her brave deeds. Due her selflessness, she had saved many from the terrorists. Imagine under such conditions of fear and terror, she is still able to give up her safety for others. Do read of how Neerja Bhanot is a true heroine.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/neerja-bhanot-a-selfless-heroine.html
  • Sofi
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 11:02 PM
    Rexie: the Australian Heroine

    Read about this loving dog that is protective of his family but also had save many lives. She had a special gift of saving people from suicide. We should never look down on animals just because they speak a different language and different set of living standard than us.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/animals-vegetarianism/rexie-the-australian-heroine.html
  • Sofi
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 10:17 PM
    My Strange Addictions

    Many people develop some form of addition as an escape or temporary respite from the stress of life. But addictions are usually something that could affect our lives adversely, like drugs, sex, alcohol, smoking, food, etc. Do read more to find out stranger addictions that people have.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/my-strange-addictions.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 12:44 PM
    Beautiful art painting Of Vajrapani and Dorje Shugden paints a thousands words. As a protector and guide of Gautama Buddha and rose to symbolize the Buddha’s power and Dorje Shugden a Dharma Protector in order to safeguard the Buddha’s teachings form a powerful combination in this beautiful thangka. It will be wonderful to have it printed in our house or on our altar.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-lord-of-secrets-vajrapani
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 12:42 PM
    Beautiful art paintings of White Tara , Ushnishavijaya (Namgyalma), Amitayus, Dorje Shugden. In Tibetan Buddhism, White Tara is also known as Jetsun Dölma as a Buddhist saviour-goddess with numerous forms, widely popular in Nepal, Tibet, and Mongolia. She is the protective, helpful and comforting mother who shows limitless kindness, generosity and protection to all who rely on her.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this wonderful sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-supreme-saviouress-white-tara
  • Samfoonheei
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 12:41 PM
    The importance of cleanliness in our lives cannot be denied. Maintaining a clean environment is for the health of all humans. As our health completely depends on the surrounding atmosphere. The practice of cleaning is not only for the environment, but also for our mind . We can change our recognition of cleaning from something that’s negative to something that’s positive, then our quality of life will improve. The importance of having a clean room, clean environment is to respect the people we invited to. To develop the clear mind, we need to be aware of being very mindful, everything should be clean. Make it as a practice, consistently .
    Thank you Rinpoche for this wonderful sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-importance-of-having-a-clean-room
  • Sofi
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 06:03 AM
    The Life of Yul Brynner (1920 – 1985)

    Read about this actor who acted in the King and, which won morvie acclaims worldwide. Interesting to learn of his life.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/film-tv-music/the-life-of-yul-brynner-1920-1985.html
  • Sofi
    Wednesday, Apr 24. 2019 05:29 AM
    Tyurgen Wowed with Mongolian Throat Singing

    An amazing Russian who won the judges’ hearts with Mongolian throat singing. You should listen to his powerful ability which is unique and welcoming.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/tyurgen-wowed-with-mongolian-throat-singing

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · »

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The Unknown

The Known and unknown are both feared,
Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
The unknown may be growth and opportunities,
One shall never know if one fears the unknown more than the known.
Who says the unknown would be worse than the known?
But then again, the unknown is sometimes worse than the known. In the end nothing is known unless we endeavour,
So go pursue all the way with the unknown,
because all unknown with familiarity becomes the known.
~Tsem Rinpoche

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A temple with a thousand Bodhi trees. Unusual and blessed- https://bit.ly/2Xn6nj6
yesterday
A temple with a thousand Bodhi trees. Unusual and blessed- https://bit.ly/2Xn6nj6
My way of sharing....
1 week ago
My way of sharing....
Peace
1 week ago
Peace
Please contemplate deeply what this message is sharing. Tsem Rinpoche
1 week ago
Please contemplate deeply what this message is sharing. Tsem Rinpoche
Japanese Buddha statues. Beautiful program- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIfNibljnoI
2 weeks ago
Japanese Buddha statues. Beautiful program- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIfNibljnoI
Japanese Buddhist altars. Beautiful- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4uqb3jPpCs
2 weeks ago
Japanese Buddhist altars. Beautiful- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4uqb3jPpCs
Beautiful Lord Buddha carving which is so elegant. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
Beautiful Lord Buddha carving which is so elegant. Tsem Rinpoche
We can love others as we heal ourselves inside...~Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
We can love others as we heal ourselves inside...~Tsem Rinpoche
Beautiful short and powerful teaching by Dilgo Kyentse Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
Beautiful short and powerful teaching by Dilgo Kyentse Rinpoche
China\'s huge Buddha statues. Amazingly beautiful- https://bit.ly/2DgSXxT
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China's huge Buddha statues. Amazingly beautiful- https://bit.ly/2DgSXxT
Such a powerful imagery of Lord Buddha\'s determination. Fasting Buddha\'s meaning- HTTP://bit.ly/2VCfKLa
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This poor boy is being forced to leave his friend to be sold for slaughter. Children have a natural connection with animals, and they know it is wrong to hurt and kill them. Children lose this connection by being indoctrinated (brainwashed) by their parents/peers into believing animals are here to be exploited, killed, and eaten.- from Lucinda Smyth FB page
2 weeks ago
This poor boy is being forced to leave his friend to be sold for slaughter. Children have a natural connection with animals, and they know it is wrong to hurt and kill them. Children lose this connection by being indoctrinated (brainwashed) by their parents/peers into believing animals are here to be exploited, killed, and eaten.- from Lucinda Smyth FB page
Some people really struggle and put in so much effort in their lives. Amazing. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
Some people really struggle and put in so much effort in their lives. Amazing. Tsem Rinpoche
18th Century Mongolian made Namgyalma statue. Very artistic. Very beautiful. Usually her arms are \'all over the place\' but this one is so artistically placed and poised. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
18th Century Mongolian made Namgyalma statue. Very artistic. Very beautiful. Usually her arms are 'all over the place' but this one is so artistically placed and poised. Tsem Rinpoche
My mother Ms. Dewa Nimbo came out with a new book. I am happy for her. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
My mother Ms. Dewa Nimbo came out with a new book. I am happy for her. Tsem Rinpoche
Challenges makes you more responsible. Always remember that life without struggle is a life without success. Don\'t give up and learn not to quit.~-Rumi
2 weeks ago
Challenges makes you more responsible. Always remember that life without struggle is a life without success. Don't give up and learn not to quit.~-Rumi
May His Holiness Dalai Lama completely recover soon- https://bit.ly/2GgMO6c
2 weeks ago
May His Holiness Dalai Lama completely recover soon- https://bit.ly/2GgMO6c
How I made my beautiful Kyabje Zong Rinpoche statue in Nepal in 1987. I have many more photos for you to see here- 
 https://bit.ly/2Z2r0T5
2 weeks ago
How I made my beautiful Kyabje Zong Rinpoche statue in Nepal in 1987. I have many more photos for you to see here- https://bit.ly/2Z2r0T5
As of April 9, 2019 there are over 240k views on this blog post regarding the relationship between Bhutan\'s Highest lama Zhabdrung Rinpoche & Dorje Shugden.- https://bit.ly/2PrE6Ui
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As of April 9, 2019 there are over 240k views on this blog post regarding the relationship between Bhutan's Highest lama Zhabdrung Rinpoche & Dorje Shugden.- https://bit.ly/2PrE6Ui
The handprint of His Holiness Kyabje Pabongka Dorje Chang Jetsun Dechen Nyingpo
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488 articles on animals, vegetarianism and environment and still growing. :) Enjoy the readings- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
2 weeks ago
488 articles on animals, vegetarianism and environment and still growing. :) Enjoy the readings- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
Beautiful Angel Dorje Shugden chapels in Kathmandu- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCaWhDHKyBA&feature=youtu.be

People love to visit & pray.
3 weeks ago
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Stunning pieces-Tibetan spiritual art-Free download- https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
3 weeks ago
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Kechara visits Shar Gaden Monastery in South India-  https://bit.ly/2VozDp4
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Obeisance to Yamantaka the powerful practice that destroys our bind to samsara.
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I love this picture of their Holinesses. Trijang Rinpoche was known to be very humorous and always joked and made Ling Rinpoche laugh very hard. The two tutors got along very well and very harmonious always. This made their job together of educating H.H. Dalai Lama very smooth and successful. Tsem Rinpoche
3 weeks ago
I love this picture of their Holinesses. Trijang Rinpoche was known to be very humorous and always joked and made Ling Rinpoche laugh very hard. The two tutors got along very well and very harmonious always. This made their job together of educating H.H. Dalai Lama very smooth and successful. Tsem Rinpoche
(left to right)Dharma boy, Mumu boy and Oser girl. Super cute doggies of Tsem Rinpoche
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(left to right)Dharma boy, Mumu boy and Oser girl. Super cute doggies of Tsem Rinpoche
You know you just want to kiss me reeeeeeeeal bad!!! ~Oser girl
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You know you just want to kiss me reeeeeeeeal bad!!! ~Oser girl
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3 weeks ago
Over 106k views! People really interested in this post: https://bit.ly/2Sczh6v
This picture I found by accident on the internet recently. This exact photo was poster size and framed and was on Thubten Dhargye Ling\'s main altar in Los Angeles back in the 80\'s when I was there. It is beautiful picture of H.H. Dalai Lama in his youth with a light glow around his body as he meditates. I love this picture of His Holiness. Tsem Rinpoche Read more-  https://bit.ly/2FECC5S
3 weeks ago
This picture I found by accident on the internet recently. This exact photo was poster size and framed and was on Thubten Dhargye Ling's main altar in Los Angeles back in the 80's when I was there. It is beautiful picture of H.H. Dalai Lama in his youth with a light glow around his body as he meditates. I love this picture of His Holiness. Tsem Rinpoche Read more- https://bit.ly/2FECC5S
Starting on Vajra Yogini now. Practicing Vajra Yogini without initiation. Find out more- https://bit.ly/2JjTTXp
3 weeks ago
Starting on Vajra Yogini now. Practicing Vajra Yogini without initiation. Find out more- https://bit.ly/2JjTTXp
Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
3 weeks ago
Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
Thai tradition of Buddhism also reveres/respects/remembers their gurus and high monks just like in the Tibetan tradition. You can see here a high guru\'s statue housed beautifully with a canopy and enshrined in a altar inside a temple for people to pay homage to him. Also an act of collecting merits for the disciples. Tsem Rinpoche
3 weeks ago
Thai tradition of Buddhism also reveres/respects/remembers their gurus and high monks just like in the Tibetan tradition. You can see here a high guru's statue housed beautifully with a canopy and enshrined in a altar inside a temple for people to pay homage to him. Also an act of collecting merits for the disciples. Tsem Rinpoche
Offering sustenance on our shrine is a sign of appreciation spiritually
3 weeks ago
Offering sustenance on our shrine is a sign of appreciation spiritually
Beautiful piece of African Dogan style art you can print out large & frame for your home- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
3 weeks ago
Beautiful piece of African Dogan style art you can print out large & frame for your home- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
I hope you\'ll be blessed by this practice of Lady Ucchusma- 
https://bit.ly/2U5Arm9
3 weeks ago
I hope you'll be blessed by this practice of Lady Ucchusma- https://bit.ly/2U5Arm9
Beautiful painting of Nechung Pehar Gyalpo & Dorje Shugden together. Masterpiece. More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
4 weeks ago
Beautiful painting of Nechung Pehar Gyalpo & Dorje Shugden together. Masterpiece. More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
Beautiful painting of Nechung Dorje Drakden & Dorje Shugden together. Masterpiece. More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
4 weeks ago
Beautiful painting of Nechung Dorje Drakden & Dorje Shugden together. Masterpiece. More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
Tsem Rinpoche’s moving experience with Lama Zopa in Kopan (1987)- https://bit.ly/2YyE42m
4 weeks ago
Tsem Rinpoche’s moving experience with Lama Zopa in Kopan (1987)- https://bit.ly/2YyE42m
Massive 2,600 year old Buddhist Monastery-Afghanistan- read more- https://bit.ly/2HTM48q
4 weeks ago
Massive 2,600 year old Buddhist Monastery-Afghanistan- read more- https://bit.ly/2HTM48q
A good person is made by the intensity of his adversity~Tsem Rinpoche
4 weeks ago
A good person is made by the intensity of his adversity~Tsem Rinpoche
BREAKING NEWS- Dharamsala MP Tenpa Yarphel says to make peace with Dorje Shugden people now!~ 
 https://bit.ly/2CESoxf
4 weeks ago
BREAKING NEWS- Dharamsala MP Tenpa Yarphel says to make peace with Dorje Shugden people now!~ https://bit.ly/2CESoxf
How the incomparable yet down to earth Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen changed my life forever- https://bit.ly/2VJjCtk

Photo: His Eminence Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen and Tsem Rinpoche
4 weeks ago
How the incomparable yet down to earth Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen changed my life forever- https://bit.ly/2VJjCtk Photo: His Eminence Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen and Tsem Rinpoche
Joanne Kam and Justin Ripley in Kechara doing some cooking..
4 weeks ago
Joanne Kam and Justin Ripley in Kechara doing some cooking..
You have to see this spectacular outdoor Amitabah statue in Vietnam. So sacred and majestic.~ https://bit.ly/2Ed0s9n
4 weeks ago
You have to see this spectacular outdoor Amitabah statue in Vietnam. So sacred and majestic.~ https://bit.ly/2Ed0s9n
Everyday offerings of fresh cooked food and drinks are offered to awakened world peace protector Dorje Shugden on my shrine. It is my way to thank Him for all the help He has given to so many people throughout the decades I\'ve introduced Him to. It is my way to include Him as my family and a feeling of closeness and gratitude I have for Him. He\'s a revered family member who happens to be enlightened and also my close friend. Tsem Rinpoche (Food offering prayer~ https://bit.ly/1VkYXJa)
1 month ago
Everyday offerings of fresh cooked food and drinks are offered to awakened world peace protector Dorje Shugden on my shrine. It is my way to thank Him for all the help He has given to so many people throughout the decades I've introduced Him to. It is my way to include Him as my family and a feeling of closeness and gratitude I have for Him. He's a revered family member who happens to be enlightened and also my close friend. Tsem Rinpoche (Food offering prayer~ https://bit.ly/1VkYXJa)
Read about this special Goddess Lok Yeay Mao of Cambodia. I came across her picture and found her very unique and blogged about it. Do enjoy the reading- https://bit.ly/2HR3vqi
1 month ago
Read about this special Goddess Lok Yeay Mao of Cambodia. I came across her picture and found her very unique and blogged about it. Do enjoy the reading- https://bit.ly/2HR3vqi
March 18, 2019-Oser is very photogenic as usual.
1 month ago
March 18, 2019-Oser is very photogenic as usual.
Click on "View All Photos" above to view more images

Videos On The Go

Please click on the images to watch video
  • Beautiful Monastery in Hong Kong
    2 weeks ago
    Beautiful Monastery in Hong Kong
  • This dog thanks his hero in such a touching way. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 weeks ago
    This dog thanks his hero in such a touching way. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
    2 weeks ago
    Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
  • These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 weeks ago
    These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
    3 weeks ago
    Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
  • Recitation of Dorje Dermo‘s mantra or the Dharani of Glorious Vajra Claws. This powerful mantra is meant to destroy all obstacles that come in our way. Beneficial to play this mantra in our environments.
    4 weeks ago
    Recitation of Dorje Dermo‘s mantra or the Dharani of Glorious Vajra Claws. This powerful mantra is meant to destroy all obstacles that come in our way. Beneficial to play this mantra in our environments.
  • Beautiful
    1 month ago
    Beautiful
    Beautiful sacred Severed Head Vajra Yogini from Tsem Rinpoche's personal shrine.
  • My little monster cute babies Dharma and Oser. Take a look and get a cute attack for the day! Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    My little monster cute babies Dharma and Oser. Take a look and get a cute attack for the day! Tsem Rinpoche
  • Plse watch this short video and see how all sentient beings are capable of tenderness and love. We should never hurt animals nor should we eat them. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    Plse watch this short video and see how all sentient beings are capable of tenderness and love. We should never hurt animals nor should we eat them. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Cruelty of some people have no limits and it’s heartbreaking. Being kind cost nothing. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 months ago
    Cruelty of some people have no limits and it’s heartbreaking. Being kind cost nothing. Tsem Rinpoche
  • SUPER ADORABLE and must see
    3 months ago
    SUPER ADORABLE and must see
    Tsem Rinpoche's dog Oser girl enjoying her snack in her play pen.
  • Cute!
    4 months ago
    Cute!
    Oser girl loves the balcony so much. - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTcoWpKJm2c
  • Uncle Wong
    4 months ago
    Uncle Wong
    We were told by Uncle Wong he is very faithful toward Dorje Shugden. Dorje Shugden has extended help to him on several occasions and now Uncle Wong comes daily to make incense offerings to Dorje Shugden. He is grateful towards the help he was given.
  • Tsem Rinpoche’s Schnauzer Dharma boy fights Robot sphere from Arkonide!
    4 months ago
    Tsem Rinpoche’s Schnauzer Dharma boy fights Robot sphere from Arkonide!
  • Cute baby owl found and rescued
    4 months ago
    Cute baby owl found and rescued
    We rescued a lost baby owl in Kechara Forest Retreat.
  • Nice cups from Kechara!!
    4 months ago
    Nice cups from Kechara!!
    Dorje Shugden people's lives matter!
  • Enjoy a peaceful morning at Kechara Forest Retreat
    4 months ago
    Enjoy a peaceful morning at Kechara Forest Retreat
    Chirping birds and other forest animals create a joyful melody at the Vajrayogini stupa in Kechara Forest Retreat (Bentong, Malaysia).
  • His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    4 months ago
    His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    Trijang Rinpoche never gave up his devotion to Dorje Shugden no matter how much Tibetan government in exile pressured him to give up. He stayed loyal inspiring so many of us.
  • Very rare video of His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche the 10th, the all knowing and compassionate one. I pay deep respects to this attained being who has taken many rebirths since the time of Lord Buddha to be of benefit to sentient beings tirelessly. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    Very rare video of His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche the 10th, the all knowing and compassionate one. I pay deep respects to this attained being who has taken many rebirths since the time of Lord Buddha to be of benefit to sentient beings tirelessly. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This bigfoot researcher gives good reasonings on bigfoot. Interesting short video.
    4 months ago
    This bigfoot researcher gives good reasonings on bigfoot. Interesting short video.
  • His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche of Gaden Shartse Monastery was one of the teachers of Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Here in this beautiful video is Geshe Kelsang Gyatso showing his centre to Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, then proceeding to sit down to receive teachings. For more information- https://bit.ly/2QNac1u
    4 months ago
    His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche of Gaden Shartse Monastery was one of the teachers of Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Here in this beautiful video is Geshe Kelsang Gyatso showing his centre to Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, then proceeding to sit down to receive teachings. For more information- https://bit.ly/2QNac1u
  • Tsem Rinpoche’s dog, Oser girl always sits on Rinpoche’s chair. When Rinpoche’s other dog, Dharma tries to get into the chair, he is chased away. Oser is the boss. She is possessive. Cute.
    5 months ago
    Tsem Rinpoche’s dog, Oser girl always sits on Rinpoche’s chair. When Rinpoche’s other dog, Dharma tries to get into the chair, he is chased away. Oser is the boss. She is possessive. Cute.
  • Lama Yeshe talks about how to practice at the beginning and at the end of each day during teachings given in London during the Lamas’ first European teaching tour in 1975. Lama Yeshe was a brilliant teacher and I wanted to share this with everyone so his teachings can reach more people. Tsem Rinpoche
    5 months ago
    Lama Yeshe talks about how to practice at the beginning and at the end of each day during teachings given in London during the Lamas’ first European teaching tour in 1975. Lama Yeshe was a brilliant teacher and I wanted to share this with everyone so his teachings can reach more people. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Our beautiful Dorje Shugden shop in the busiest part of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Many tourists visit our store and this area.
    5 months ago
    Our beautiful Dorje Shugden shop in the busiest part of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Many tourists visit our store and this area.
  • Living off the grid in Australia
    5 months ago
    Living off the grid in Australia
    A Jill Redwood is a jack of all trades, Jill built her own house on her property and lives entirely off the grid with no mains power or town water, mobile reception or television. Living on around $80 a week, Jill has over sixty animals to keep her company and an abundant garden that out serves as an organic supermarket right at her doorstep. Her main expenses are animal feed and the rates on her property. Watch this incredible three minute video and be inspired to live differently.
  • Kyabje Dagom Choktrul Rinpoche offering gold on a 350 year-old Dorje Shugden statue in his chapel in Lhasa. This is how Tibetans show homage and pay respect to a holy image. This chapel and statue of Dorje Shugden in Lhasa dedicated to Dorje Shugden was built by the Great 5th Dalai Lama. Tsem Rinpoche
    5 months ago
    Kyabje Dagom Choktrul Rinpoche offering gold on a 350 year-old Dorje Shugden statue in his chapel in Lhasa. This is how Tibetans show homage and pay respect to a holy image. This chapel and statue of Dorje Shugden in Lhasa dedicated to Dorje Shugden was built by the Great 5th Dalai Lama. Tsem Rinpoche
  • My sweet little Oser girl is so photogenic and adorable. Tsem Rinpoche
    5 months ago
    My sweet little Oser girl is so photogenic and adorable. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Heart Sutra sang by a monk for the modern crowd. Very interesting and beautiful. Tsem Rinpoche
    5 months ago
    Heart Sutra sang by a monk for the modern crowd. Very interesting and beautiful. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Submerging powerful mantra stones in water at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
    5 months ago
    Submerging powerful mantra stones in water at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
  • This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    1 years ago
    This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    This video is thought-provoking and very interesting. Watch! Thanks so much to our friends at LIVEKINDLY.
  • Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
    1 years ago
    Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
  • BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
    1 years ago
    BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
    1 years ago
    Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
  • Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
    1 years ago
    Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
  • Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    2 yearss ago
    This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    she received “one last visit from an old friend” 💔💔
  • Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
    2 yearss ago
    Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
  • Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
    2 yearss ago
    Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
  • Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant  Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
    2 yearss ago
    Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
  • Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
    2 yearss ago
    Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
  • Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
  • What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    2 yearss ago
    What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    Sick animals are more profitable... farms calculate how close to death they can keep animals without killing them. That's the business model. How quickly they can be made to grow, how tightly they can be packed, how much or how little can they eat, how sick they can get without dying... We live in a world in which it's conventional to treat an animal like a block of wood. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer
  • This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
    2 yearss ago
    This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
  • SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    2 yearss ago
    SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    This happens daily in slaughterhouse so you can get your pork and Bak ku teh. Stop eating meat.

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CHAT PICTURES

KSK Penang Team visited a dialysis patient to deliver dry food provisions for his family. He has a kidney transplant when he was 12 years old and for the past years is undergoing dialysis three times a week and this has put a financial strain to him. We will try to assist him in anyway we can. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
17 hours ago
KSK Penang Team visited a dialysis patient to deliver dry food provisions for his family. He has a kidney transplant when he was 12 years old and for the past years is undergoing dialysis three times a week and this has put a financial strain to him. We will try to assist him in anyway we can. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
One day, we received a humble wish list from this poor family, an elderly mother who takes care of her grown up son with special needs. ‘It’s quite uneasy to use toilet without a proper door but I do not have enough money to fix it,’ said the mother. Without a second thought, our kindest sponsor, La Hong Eu has decided to make meaningful sponsorship to this case. Big thanks to Bernard Ting and Vickneshwaran for helping this family to replace the broken one with a brand new folding door. Together we are the reason that someone has a sweet smile on her face. #Kechara #foodbank #care - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 days ago
One day, we received a humble wish list from this poor family, an elderly mother who takes care of her grown up son with special needs. ‘It’s quite uneasy to use toilet without a proper door but I do not have enough money to fix it,’ said the mother. Without a second thought, our kindest sponsor, La Hong Eu has decided to make meaningful sponsorship to this case. Big thanks to Bernard Ting and Vickneshwaran for helping this family to replace the broken one with a brand new folding door. Together we are the reason that someone has a sweet smile on her face. #Kechara #foodbank #care - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Laying the rescued food down on the table would mean we will minimise chance of wastage from another level when our recipients will have the privilege to choose what they really need and want. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
3 days ago
Laying the rescued food down on the table would mean we will minimise chance of wastage from another level when our recipients will have the privilege to choose what they really need and want. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Have you ever done beading? Join us for a blessed Saturday in Kechara Forest Retreat! http://bit.ly/2IMh5eN - shared by Pastor Antoinette
3 days ago
Have you ever done beading? Join us for a blessed Saturday in Kechara Forest Retreat! http://bit.ly/2IMh5eN - shared by Pastor Antoinette
What do you do on Saturday mornings? Join us for a meaningful time and be blessed by the Buddhas during the Spiritual Saturday at Kechara Forest Retreat! - shared by Pastor Antoinette
3 days ago
What do you do on Saturday mornings? Join us for a meaningful time and be blessed by the Buddhas during the Spiritual Saturday at Kechara Forest Retreat! - shared by Pastor Antoinette
With Dorje Shugden in your car, bus, bike, boat or lorry, you will be protected and blessed. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
4 days ago
With Dorje Shugden in your car, bus, bike, boat or lorry, you will be protected and blessed. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Recently in Kechara Forest Retreat, this bus was blessed and is now protected by the Three Jewels. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
4 days ago
Recently in Kechara Forest Retreat, this bus was blessed and is now protected by the Three Jewels. - shared by Pastor Antoinette
Volunteers do not necessarily have the time, they just have the heart. In order to send the foodpack to our client in johor bahru area, we need a team that are always ready . Luckily, we have a group of wonderful volunteers that are commited to serve our community. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 days ago
Volunteers do not necessarily have the time, they just have the heart. In order to send the foodpack to our client in johor bahru area, we need a team that are always ready . Luckily, we have a group of wonderful volunteers that are commited to serve our community. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Children paint their own mask for Halloween day. Lin Mun KSDS
5 days ago
Children paint their own mask for Halloween day. Lin Mun KSDS
Parents and students did a group discussion together on the Bully topic  Lin Mun KSDS
5 days ago
Parents and students did a group discussion together on the Bully topic Lin Mun KSDS
A talk on Bully by Peggy. A very informative sharing for students and parents. Lin Mun KSDS
5 days ago
A talk on Bully by Peggy. A very informative sharing for students and parents. Lin Mun KSDS
Great to start kids with dharma knowledge from young. Lin Mun KSDS
5 days ago
Great to start kids with dharma knowledge from young. Lin Mun KSDS
Teacher Victoria guided the students to do prayer in the dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
5 days ago
Teacher Victoria guided the students to do prayer in the dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
Creative horror drawing created by Teacher Kien. Alice, KSDS
5 days ago
Creative horror drawing created by Teacher Kien. Alice, KSDS
Teacher Asyley led the kids to participate animal liberation. Alice, KSDS
5 days ago
Teacher Asyley led the kids to participate animal liberation. Alice, KSDS
Healthy Meals for lunch sponsored by Mr Ravi & friends! We thank you for your unending support to #kecharasoupkitchen in our plight in serving the #homeless. Would you like to sponsor lunch for our street friends? To find out more, checkout our website for more details :) Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
6 days ago
Healthy Meals for lunch sponsored by Mr Ravi & friends! We thank you for your unending support to #kecharasoupkitchen in our plight in serving the #homeless. Would you like to sponsor lunch for our street friends? To find out more, checkout our website for more details :) Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
7 days ago
1 week ago
Bernard was briefing the volunteers on the details before they headed out last Saturday to PPR Kota Damansara. #kechara #foodbank #urbanpoor - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
1 week ago
Bernard was briefing the volunteers on the details before they headed out last Saturday to PPR Kota Damansara. #kechara #foodbank #urbanpoor - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Seen here are team leaders giving their final briefing to the respective volunteers before they head out last night. Thank you very much to all the volunteers who turned up. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 weeks ago
Seen here are team leaders giving their final briefing to the respective volunteers before they head out last night. Thank you very much to all the volunteers who turned up. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Thank you very much to James and Shereen for sponsoring oranges for tonight's distribution. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 weeks ago
Thank you very much to James and Shereen for sponsoring oranges for tonight's distribution. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
We received a lot wine bottles for recycling. It was packed nicely by the person. KEP-Serena
2 weeks ago
We received a lot wine bottles for recycling. It was packed nicely by the person. KEP-Serena
Today we are having recycling activity at Kechara Soup Kitchen. You can drop the recycled items here if you are nearby. KEP-Serena
2 weeks ago
Today we are having recycling activity at Kechara Soup Kitchen. You can drop the recycled items here if you are nearby. KEP-Serena
The generous support from Tesco Malaysia and AEON Retail Malaysia have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thank you very much! Here are photos taken during the distribution at government low cost flat. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 weeks ago
The generous support from Tesco Malaysia and AEON Retail Malaysia have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thank you very much! Here are photos taken during the distribution at government low cost flat. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Thank you committed university students of University of Malaya for helping in our #foodrescue activities. These still good to eat and in date edible bread will be very useful for the needy students in universities! Thank you Komugi Malaysia for contributing and help reduce food wastage! #zerofoodwastage #kecharafoodbank #kecharasoupkitchen #endhunger - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
2 weeks ago
Thank you committed university students of University of Malaya for helping in our #foodrescue activities. These still good to eat and in date edible bread will be very useful for the needy students in universities! Thank you Komugi Malaysia for contributing and help reduce food wastage! #zerofoodwastage #kecharafoodbank #kecharasoupkitchen #endhunger - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
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Dorje Shugden
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