Mount Wutai – The Earthly Abode of Lord Manjushri

Dec 4, 2016 | Views: 1,542
Mount Wutai is located in Shanxi province of Northeastern China

Mount Wutai is located in Shanxi province in northeastern part of China.

(By Tsem Rinpoche)

Articles about holy sites such as Mount Wutai (五台山), the Great Buddha of Kamakura in Japan, the Temple of the Tooth in the city of Kandi, Sri Lanka, Bodhgaya, Lumbini, Varanasi and Kushinagar provide information and inspire readers to visit these important religious sites.

A particular place can be considered holy when at least one of the following criteria is met:

  1. Someone had engaged in intensive meditation to generate higher insight and state of mind (e.g., love, compassion, and bodhicitta) in the area and therefore infused positive energy into the place.
  2. Someone had a pure vision of a holy being (for example, a Buddha, a Mahasiddha, daka, or dakini) and/or received teachings from the holy being(s) in the area. This would have imbued the place with the energy and blessings of the holy beings and/or teachings.
  3. A place where holy beings abide or where supernatural beings engaged in virtuous activities, which blessed the place with positive energy.
  4. The place was blessed or consecrated by a highly realised being who invited the enlightened beings to reside there.

When visiting places that have been blessed, visitors can feel a sense of peace, happiness, healing, and well-being from the positive energy of that environment. It can also leave a spiritual imprint or open up an existing positive imprint in the minds of visitors or pilgrims, which can help spur them on their spiritual path.

Many of the great masters who were recognised as Dorje Shugden’s previous incarnations, such as Sakya Pandita and Buton Rinchen Drub played important roles in the establishment of Mount Wutai as centre of Buddhist practice. Since Dorje Shugden is the emanation of Manjushri, it further strengthens the belief that Dorje Shugden is an enlightened being.

Of the places on this earth that Manjushri chooses to reside on, Wu Tai Shan has been closely associated with his beneficial wisdom energy for centuries. Hundreds and thousands of practitioners have made their way there to engage in practices. Everyone in their lifetime should do their best to go on pilgrimage to this holy abode of the Wisdom Buddha Manjushri, and to request Lord Manjushri’s blessings in their practice.

Tsem Rinpoche

 


 

Overview

Avatamsaka Sutra, also known as the Flower Garland Sutra. Click to enlarge.

Mount Wutai is believed to be the earthly abode of Manjushri, the Buddha of Wisdom. Its connection to Manjushri is mentioned in a passage of Avatamsaka Sutra (the Flower Garland Sutra), which contains information about the abodes of various bodhisattvas including those relating to Manjushri. According to the Sutra, Manjushri resides on a “clear cold mountain” in the northeastern part of China, which would later be known as Mount Wutai. The Sutra conveys the story of an Indian monk from the 1st century who travelled to China and lived on Mount Wutai, where he had a vision of Manjushri. Avatamsaka Sutra legitimises Mount Wutai as the dwelling place of Manjushri, and it is said that Manjushri is often sighted on Mount Wutai taking the form of ordinary pilgrims, monks or unusual five-coloured clouds in the area.

Buddha of Wisdom Manjushri. Click to enlarge.

Manjushri is believed to have chosen Mount Wutai as his dwelling place to help those who sincerely wish to obtain higher spiritual attainments and eventually achieve enlightenment. Due to this reason, Mount Wutai is considered to be one of the most sacred Buddhist pilgrimage sites for Buddhists around the world and has also developed as a tourist attraction. In 2009, Mount Wutai was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Mount Wutai is regarded as one of the four sacred mountains in China where enlightened beings are known to reside. These four sacred mountains are:

  • Wutai Shan, also known as Mount Wutai, located in Shanxi Province and known as the earthly abode of the Buddha of Wisdom Manjushri.
  • E Mei Shan (峨眉山), also known as Mount E Mei, located in Sichuan Province and known as the earthly abode of the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra.
  • Jiu Hua Shan (九华山), also known as Mount Jiu Hua, located in Anhui Province and known as the earthly abode of the Bodhisattva Dizang or Ksitigarbha.
  • Pu Tuo Shan (普陀山), also known as Mount Pu Tuo, located in Zhejiang Province and known as the earthly abode of the Buddha of Compassion Chenrezig. Chenrezig is also known as Avalokiteshvara in Sanskrit or Guan Yin in Chinese.

Mount Wutai is well-known for its five flat-topped peaks. Each peak is believed to be occupied by a different form of Manjushri. The highest peak is the Northern Terrace at 3,058 m (10,033 ft) above sea level, and the Southern Terrace is the lowest peak at 2,485 m (8,153 ft) above sea level. The distance between the highest and the lowest peak is approximately 9.3 km (5.78 mi).

There are over 53 monasteries and temples on Mount Wutai. Due to its remote location, many of these ancient temples and monasteries survived the Cultural Revolution in China in the 1960s. Therefore, even today, pilgrims can see existing wooden structures that were originally built during the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907 CE).

Go To History >>

Back to Tabs

History

Prior to the arrival of Buddhism in China, Mount Wutai was known as Zi Fu Shan (紫府山) or Purple Palace Mountain. It was originally known as a sacred mountain to the Taoist tradition, and many Taoist saints are known to have lived there. It was during the Eastern Han Dynasty (漢朝) (25 – 220 CE) the earliest Buddhist temples began to be constructed on the mountain. However, it was not until the 5th century, during the time of the Northern Wei (北魏) Dynasty (386 – 535 CE), that Mount Wutai was recognised as the earthly abode of Manjushri.

 

The Tang (唐) Dynasty

A map of Tang Dynasty

A map of the Tang Dynasty.

Mount Wutai, as the earthly abode of Manjushri, was further popularised in the 8th century by the imperial rulers of China who attempted to create a link between themselves and Manjushri in order to legitimise their power. During that time, one of the most politically powerful monks in Chinese history, Amoghavajra (705 – 774 CE), chose Mount Wutai as the site to pray for the protection and preservation of the nation, which included the ritual of carrying various Buddha statues in procession around the mountain. Furthermore, during the Tang Dynasty, Mount Wutai became the sacred site at which the Tang emperors received spiritual mandates from Manjushri, as well as sacred messages from heaven, which allowed the emperors to exercise their power on earth. As such, Mount Wutai become the focus of imperial attention, and the ritual act of procession was used as a legitimate method by subsequent rulers (e.g., Manchu, Tibetan, and Mongolian rulers) to communicate with Manjushri.

 

Amoghavajra (705 – 774 CE)

Amoghavajra

Amoghavajra (705 – 774 CE), an influential monk in the Tang Dynasty.

Amoghavajra was born in Samarkand, a city in the present-day Uzbekistan, to an Indian father and a Sogdian mother. Following his father’s passing in 715 CE, he moved to China where he was ordained by Vajrabodhi, an esoteric Buddhist teacher of the Tang Dynasty, four years later. Amoghavajra was a productive translator and was regarded as one of the eight patriarchs of the Shingon, one of the major schools of Buddhism practised in Japan. As a trusted spiritual guide to several Tang emperors, Amoghavajra was granted the permission to create the first Abhiseka-Bodhi-Mandala School at Daxing Shan Temple (大兴善寺), which is now known as the Chinese Esoteric School.

Amoghavajra served three emperors during the Tang Dynasty: Emperor Xuanzong (唐玄宗) (r. 712 – 756), Emperor Suzong (唐肃宗) (r.756-762 CE), and Emperor Taizong (唐代宗) (r. 626 – 649). He also began the construction of the magnificent Jinge Temple (金閣寺) on Mount Wutai in order to promote Manjushri as the Buddha and protector of China. Jinge temple was completed in 767 CE. He was a famous practitioner of Buddhist tantra, who would perform potent rituals to avert various disasters. He dedicated the remaining years of his life to translate and edit 120 volumes of tantric teachings to benefit sentient beings. After he passed away in 774 CE, he was posthumously bestowed various honorary titles such as Thesaurus of Wisdom, Amogha Tripitaka, and Minister of State.

 

Tibetan Influence

The map of Mount Wutai dated 1596

A map of Mount Wutai from 1596 CE.

A 10th century mural painting of Mount Wutai found in Cave 61, Mogao Caves in Dunhuang County. Click to enlarge.

Buton Rinchen Drub (1290 - 1364 CE)

Buton Rinchen Drub (1290-1364 CE). Click to enlarge.

Tibetan rulers had shown great interest in Mount Wutai especially during the height of the country’s military expansion between the 7th and 8th century. During this period, Tibetan kings and Chinese emperors established cultural exchange for the first time in history. In fact, according to the Testament of Ba, a Tibetan account on the establishment of Buddhism in Tibet and the construction of Samye Monastery, Tibetan envoys who were returning from China made an extremely long detour in order to visit Mount Wutai in 755 CE. The Testament of Ba was written by Ba Salnang, a member of King Trisong Detsen’s (r. 755 – 797 CE) court, whose works have been cited by many historians over the years. In the Chinese history book titled the Old Tang Dynasty History, it is mentioned that in 824 CE, the Tibetan King Trisong Detsen requested a map of Mount Wutai from the Tang imperial court. In the 830s CE, the earliest depictions of Mount Wutai were painted in the murals that adorned the walls of the Thousand Buddha Grottoes (Mogao Caves (莫高窟) in Dunhuang County (敦煌), when the area was under the authority of the Tibetan empire. The murals contain information on topography, history, and various narratives of miracles that occurred on Mount Wutai.

Buton Rinchen Drub (1290 – 1364 CE), a famous Tibetan scholar, in one of his works titled the History of Buddhism, stated that the first Tibetan king, Songtsen Gampo (r. 617 – 650 CE), built 108 temples on Mount Wutai. In addition to the imperial family of Tibet, several distinguished masters, such as the 8th century Indian scholar Vimalamitra who established the Dzogchen lineage in Tibet, also embarked on pilgrimage to the sacred mountain.

King Songtsen Gampo built 108 temples on Mount Wutai

King Songtsen Gampo who built 108 temples on Mount Wutai.

Tibet’s interest in Mount Wutai grew between the late-12th and early-13th century when Nyangrel Nyima Ozer (1136 – 1204 CE), wrote extensive accounts on the life of the tantric adept Padmasambhava, and the lives of the Tibetan kings of the 8th century. Nyangrel Nyima Ozer was considered the emanation of King Trisong Detsen’s mind, and was the first of the great Tertons, or hidden-treasure revealers of the Nyingma tradition. In his writings, he mentioned that when King Trisong Detsen was visiting Mount Wutai, Manjushri gave him the advice to establish Buddhism as the official religion of Tibet. Therefore, Tibet as a religious state based on the Buddhist principles was a direct result of Manjushri’s advice. Later on, King Trisong Detsen himself came to be regarded as an emanation of Manjushri, and was often depicted with Manjushri’s implements such as a sword and a Dharma text.

In this picture, King Trisong Detsen is depicted as the emanation of Manjushri.

In this picture, King Trisong Detsen is depicted as the emanation of Manjushri.

 

Padampa Sangye

Padampa Sangye

Padampa Sangye

Padampa Sangye, an 11th century Buddhist master, was a South Indian monk who founded the Zhije school of Buddhism, also known as the Pacification of Suffering tradition. Padampa Sangye travelled to Tibet on at least three occasions. In Tibet, he was referred to as ‘Black Acarya’ and ‘Little Black Indian’ due to his dark skin colour. Acarya means a great scholar who has mastered the teachings and can instruct others to achieve the same level of learning and realisation. Padampa Sangye stayed on Mount Wutai for eleven years (1086 – 1097 CE). His biography includes an account of his meeting with Manjushri on Mount Wutai, who came to him in the form of an old sage carrying a rattan stick. The old sage told him that China was a country full of epidemics, and the only thing that could salvage the situation was a dharani of Ushnishavijaya (known as Namgyalma in Tibetan) that was located at the Vajrasana, or the sacred seat on which Buddha Shakyamuni achieved enlightenment, today this area is known as the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodhgaya, India. A dharani is a verse or short text that encapsulates the entire meaning and essence of a sutra or particular practice, while Ushnishavijaya is one of the three main long-life Buddhas. The old sage gave further instruction to Padampa Sangye to go to a particular cave where there was a hole that could instantly transport him back and forth between Mount Wutai and the Vajrasana. Padampa Sangye did as he was told and successfully rid China of the epidemics by obtaining the dharani. The story of Padampa Sangye’s meeting with Manjushri on Mount Wutai has become a popular legend. Padampa Sangye used his time in China to teach and spread the principles of the Zhije School and the pacification of suffering teachings. Some practitioners even claimed that he stayed on Mount Wutai to teach and meditate until the day of his passing.

 

The Tangut Empire of Western Xia (西夏)

Map depicting Tangut Empire from the 11th century

A map depicting Tangut Empire from the 11th century

In 1036, the Tanguts of the Western Xia Dynasty invaded the city of Dunhuang and discovered the murals on Mount Wutai that were painted by the Tibetans. Just like the previous Chinese and Tibetan rulers, the Tanguts wished to legitimise their authority and lavish imperial lifestyle by creating a direct connection between the Tangut emperors and Manjushri.

Therefore, the Tanguts made an effort to establish and enforce their own Buddhist ideology on Mount Wutai. The Tanguts were devoted to the Avatamsaka Sutra, which further reinforced the belief that Mount Wutai was the earthly abode of Manjushri. Due to the complexity of their political relationship with the Chinese, the Tanguts built their own version of Mount Wutai on the Helan Mountains and called it the ‘Northern Mount Wutai’. It was situated to the west of their capital, Xi Ping Fu (西平府), in the 11th century. They even replicated two major temples from Mount Wutai, namely Qingliang Temple (清涼寺) and Foguang Temple (佛光寺). However, the Tanguts were not the only group who decided to build their own version of Mount Wutai. The Khitans of the Liao Dynasty (遼朝) (907 – 1125 CE) and the Mongols had also built their own versions of the mountain within their own borders.

 

Mongolian Interest

In the mid-13th century, during the time of the Yuan Dynasty, Mount Wutai became the centre of political life in China. Even though the Mongolians had ruled the Chinese territories for some time, it was not until 1271 CE that Kublai Khan (1215 – 1294 CE), the grandson of Genghis Khan, officially announced the adoption of the Chinese tradition and the founding the Yuan (元) Dynasty (1271 – 1368 CE). The growth of Tibetan Buddhism during this period was due to his policies, which favoured this faith. Some people even believed Kublai Khan was an emanation of Manjushri, who was sent to China to spread the Dharma.

Portrait of Kublai Khan

The Portrait of Kublai Khan.

However, the claim that Kublai Khan was an emanation of Manjushri was not a belief held by all. Urgyanpa Rinchen Pel (Urgyanpa) (1229 – 1309 CE), a contemporary of the emperor, had strong reservations about the credibility of this claim. In his biography that was written by his student, Sonam Ozer, Urgyanpa argued that if Kublai Khan was truly an emanation of Manjushri, the emperor’s glorious power should have come from meditative concentration on Manjushri, not through tyranny. In Urgyanpa’s opinion, the fact that Kublai Khan used oppression and intimidation to expand his territory meant that he was not the legitimate emanation of Manjushri. On the other hand, another contemporary from the Yuan Dynasty, Monlam Dorje (1284 – 1346 CE), thought otherwise. In the biography written by his son, Tselpa, he claimed that Kublai Khan was the true emanation of Manjushri. This claim succeeded in enhancing Mount Wutai’s reputation in the eyes of subsequent emperors, as a place for gaining and maintaining political power.

Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyatsen (1182 - 1251 CE)

Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyatsen (Sakya Pandita) (1182 – 1251 CE).
Click to enlarge.

During Kublai Khan’s reign, many prominent Tibetan lamas visited the Mongolian court and Mount Wutai, which further increased its sanctity. One of the most prominent Tibetan Lamas who visited Mount Wutai was Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyaltsen (1182 – 1251 CE), who was recognised as an emanation of Manjushri. As a matter of fact, Sakya Pandita’s nephew, Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen (1235 – 1280 CE), dedicated his life to composing the texts on Manjushri and Mount Wutai. He composed an important 100 verse poem about the mountain called ‘The Garland of Jewels: Praise to Manjushri on Five-Peak Mountain’ in 1257 CE. Due to his devotion to Manjushri and the mountain, Kublai Khan made him the Imperial Chaplain, a post considered to be the highest spiritual authority in the government. This tradition continued with the subsequent Yuan emperors appointed Tibetan Buddhist monks to the highest religious positions in the imperial government.

The Great White Stupa

The Great White Stupa

Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen’s student, Ga Aknyen Dampa Kunga Drak (1230 – 1303 CE), who was a skilled tantric practitioner in Kublai Khan’s court, also lived on Mount Wutai for almost ten years. Kublai Khan appointed him as the abbot of the Temple of Longevity and Tranquillity (Shouning si (壽寧寺)). Such a prestigious position elevated the monastery’s reputation as the first significant Tibetan Buddhist monastery ever built on the mountain. It is important to note that Ga Aknyen Dampa Kunga Drak was given this prestigious post because he used his tantric powers to help the Mongolian army to win many battles. One such battle led to the fall of the Southern Song (南宋) Dynasty (1127 – 1279 CE) and marked the beginning of the Mongolian Yuan Dynasty. It was Kublai Khan who commenced the construction of the Great White Stupa that later became an iconic landmark associated with Mount Wutai.

 

The Ming (明) Dynasty

The 5th Karmapa Deshin Shekpa (1384 - 1415 CE)

The 5th Karmapa Deshin Shekpa (1384 – 1415 CE).
Click to enlarge.

Following the fall of the Yuan Dynasty in 1368, the Han Chinese regained power in China and established the Ming Dynasty (1368 – 1644 CE). During this period, Tibetan Buddhism experienced minimal support from the imperial elite. However, several Ming emperors and monarchs were known to be adherents of Tibetan Buddhism. Even though they experienced resistance from their Confucian advisers, sovereigns such as Emperor Yongle (永楽帝 ) (1403 – 1424 CE) and Emperor Zhengde (正德) (1505 – 1521 CE) supported Tibetan Buddhism to the best of their ability, and this was especially apparent on Mount Wutai. Emperor Yongle renovated and expanded the Clear Understanding Monastery (Yuanzhao Temple (圓照寺)) in 1406, and even invited the 5th Karmapa Deshin Shekpa (1384 – 1415 CE) to visit his court. The Karmapa’s image was later made and installed at Xiantong (显通寺), one of the temples on Mount Wutai. The emperor also made a donation on behalf of the 5th Karmapa, which was used to renovate the Great White Stupa in 1407 CE. Later, Lama Tsongkhapa’s distinguished disciple Shakya Yeshe (1354 – 1435 CE) also stayed at the Xiantong Temple and Yuanzhao Temple for four years. During his stay, he built five or six more temples and worked to introduce the Gelug tradition in the area.

Statue of Chakzampa Tangtong Gyelpo

The statue of Chakzampa Thangtong Gyalpo (1361 – 1485 CE).

The Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism made greater impact during the Ming Dynasty when Emperor Xuande (宣德) (1426 – 1435 CE) appointed the abbot of Yuanzhao Temple as the manager of Chinese and Tibetan Buddhist affairs on the mountain. This appointment was significant because it implied that Yuanzhao Temple was acknowledged as the first major Gelugpa temple in China. Another prominent Tibetan figure who came to meditate on the mountain was Chakzampa Thangtong Gyalpo (Thangtong Gyalpo) (1361 – 1485 CE). In addition to his meditation, he gave oral transmissions of the Litany of the Names of Manjushri, otherwise known as the Manjushrinamasamgiti in Sanskrit. When he was meditating on Mount Wutai, Thangtong Gyalpo had visions of Manjushri who instructed him to build geomantic focal points to suppress the four elements. His pure vision on Manjushri made him even more renowned.

 

The Qing (清) Dynasty

Qing Dynasty map of Mount Wutai

A Qing Dynasty map of Mount Wutai. Click to enlarge.

After the fall of the Ming Dynasty, the Manchus seized the authority in China and established the Qing Dynasty in 1644 CE. The Manchus were nomadic people from the northeastern plains who also believed that their monarchs were the manifestations of Manjushri. During the Qing Dynasty, Mount Wutai received more attention from the court and enjoyed more autonomous power as compared to the previous dynasties.

Inspired by the successful alliance between Kublai Khan and his spiritual adviser, Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen, in the Yuan Dynasty, the Manchus decided to adopt this proven model in their imperial court. The Manchu emperors declared themselves as the worthy successors of Kublai Khan in spiritual terms, which meant that they were also the emanations of Manjushri. In short, they declared themselves to be the reincarnations of Kublai Khan, once again, blurring the line between the monarchy and Tibetan Buddhism. It was important for the Manchus to draw on the similarities with the Mongols by using Tibetan Buddhism because this spiritual ‘lineage’ was seen as a powerful symbol of political legitimacy in the 17th and 18th century. The Manchus, like the Mongols, were a minority in China, a fact that could have easily made them feel like outsiders. Therefore, embracing Tibetan Buddhism was seen as a strategic move to assure people that they were a part of the community, not mere invaders.

They went as far as changing the name of their ethnic group from Jurchen to ‘Manju’ in 1635 to validate their close relationship with Manjushri. In addition, Emperor Kangxi (康熙) (r. 1661 – 1723 CE) referred to himself as an emanation of Manjushri in the Introduction to the official Mongolian translation of the Tibetan Buddhist canon:

Then Manjushri, the savior of all living forms, [with the] intellect of all the Buddhas, was transformed into human form, and ascended the Fearless Lion Throne of gold; and this was none other than the sublime Emperor Kangxi-Manjushri who assisted and brought joy to the entire vast world…

Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty

Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (r. 1661 – 1723) who was considered as the emanation of Manjushri. Click to enlarge.

Emperor Kangxi embarked on Buddhist pilgrimage to Mount Wutai at least five times to show his extraordinary devotion to and close relationship with Manjushri, the state’s spiritual protector. During the Qing Dynasty, the monasteries and temples on Mount Wutai were given the freedom to look after their own affairs while the Tibetan and Mongolian clergies enjoyed privileged positions within the imperial court. The emperor also sent 40 Mongolian lamas to Mount Wutai in 1655 CE, and converted 10 Chinese Buddhist monasteries into Tibetan and Mongolian Buddhist institutions between 1683 and 1705 CE, with his full financial support. The Qing emperor also granted the prestigious position of ‘Head of all Religious and Temporal Affairs’ for both Tibetan and Chinese Buddhist institutions on Mount Wutai, to a Mongolian practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, the Jasagh Lama from Pusa Ding (菩薩頂) Temple.

Contrary to the Ming Dynasty that did not support the locally printed travel booklet to various sites on the mountain, the Qing Dynasty heavily supported their publication in Chinese language. One may suggest that this deliberate action was taken with the aim of spreading the message that Emperor Kangxi was the emanation of Manjushri.

Emperor Kangxi’s grandson, Emperor Qianlong (乾隆), also appointed Changkya Hutuktu Rolpai Dorje (Changkya Rolpai Dorje) (1717 – 1786 CE), the most influential lama of Inner Asia and China in the 18th century, as the emperor’s personal chaplain. He played an important role in spreading the Tibetan Buddhist influence on the mountain. At the time, Changkya Rolpai Dorje was as powerful as the Dalai Lama since he was in charge of all Gelug affairs in the Eastern Tibet. Changkya Rolpai Dorje also advised the emperor on political matters including the formation of the Sino-Tibetan system of the Qing Dynasty.

Since he was young, Changkya Rolpai Dorje was educated in Buddhist scriptures; and the Chinese, Mongolian, Manchu, and Tibetan languages, alongside the imperial princes which included the future Emperor Qianlong. The close relationship between Changkya Rolpai Dorje and the future emperor allowed him to play an important role in the imperial court. Amongst his many roles, Changkya Rolpai Dorje was an imperial adviser and was thus able to guide the emperor during the policy creation towards Tibet and Mongolia that highlighted the heritage of Kublai Khan, with a special emphasis on the connection with Manjushri.

Changkya Rolpai Dorje focused his attention on the Tibetan and Mongolian Buddhist identity of Mount Wutai, and personally supervised the administration of six temples. He also wrote a Tibetan Buddhist pilgrimage guide titled ‘Pilgrimage Guide to the Pure Realm of Clear and Cool Mountain’ that was translated into Mongolian, and actively promoted pilgrimages to Mount Wutai amongst Mongolians and Tibetans. He spent 36 consecutive summers at the Taming of the Ocean Monastery (Zhenhai Temple (殊像寺)), to engage in meditative retreats, from 1750 CE until his death in 1786 CE.

The similarities between Changkya Rolpai Dorje’s patron-priest relationship with Emperor Qianlong, and Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen’s relationship with Kublai Khan were striking, especially after Changkya Rolpai Dorje initiated Emperor Qianlong into the Buddhist rites of the universal emperor or chakravartin in 1745 CE. Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen had done the same for Kublai Khan. In 1753 CE, Changkya Rolpai Dorje also translated Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen’s biography into Mongolian. Changkya Rolpai Dorje and Emperor Qianlong were believed to be Chogyel Pakpa Lodro Gyeltsen’s and Kublai Khan’s reincarnations. Therefore, they acted and behaved with each other in exactly the same manner as they had done in their previous lives. Changkya Rolpai Dorje passed away on Mount Wutai in 1786 CE, and a stupa that contained his relics was erected at Zhenhai Temple complex.

In the early 1840s CE, the Qing Empire was hit by an economic crisis, mainly because they maintained a low tax rate while the population grew at an unprecedented speed. The economic crisis left the Mount Wutai administration with insufficient funds. This circumstance forced the monks to travel outside China, to Mongolia and as far as Buryatia, in order to raise funds. This approach proved to be successful. The monks returned with Mongol-donated livestock, gold, and silver. The Mongols’ assistance during this difficult time created a strong bond between the monks on Mount Wutai and the Mongolian people. When Mount Wutai monks received news of the arrival of princely Mongolian caravans they would personally meet them at the border and took care of the bureaucrats on their journey to Mount Wutai.

 

Changkya Rolpai Dorje (1717-1786 CE)

Changkya Hutuktu Rolpai Dorje

Changkya Rolpai Dorje (1717 – 1786 CE), the spiritual guide of Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty. Click to enlarge.

Changkya Rolpai Dorje was born on the 10th day of the fourth month in 1717 CE near Lanzhou in Gansu. When he was a little boy, the first Jamyang Zhepa recognised him as the incarnation of the previous Changkya Hutuktu of Gonlung Monastery in Amdo, which was one of the four great Gelug monasteries in Northern Tibet. Changkya Rolpai Dorje met Emperor Yongzheng (r. 1722 – 1735 CE) during the battle between Qing forces and the rebels in Amdo. The emperor ordered the seven year old Changkya Rolpai Dorje to be brought to his court. He was groomed to become a bridge between the Qing rulers and the Buddhists of Amdo, Tibet and Mongolia. Changkya Rolpai Dorje was responsible for translating Gelugpa texts into Chinese and Mongolian to spread the teachings. During his time as a student at the court, he became a good friend of Prince Hungli, who would later become Emperor Qianlong (r. 1735 – 1796 CE). In 1744 CE, Emperor Qianlong transformed Yonghegong Palace (雍和宫) in Beijing to serve both as a Gelugpa monastery and as an Imperial Palace. The transformed palace became the residence of Changkya Rolpai Dorje and other prominent religious figures from Amdo and Mongolia.

Emperor Qianlong as an emanation of Manjushri

Emperor Qianlong (r. 1735 – 1796 CE) as the emanation of Manjushri. Click to enlarge.

At the request of Emperor Qianlong, Changkya Rolpai Dorje gave him private instructions on how to take refuge in the Three Jewels and on Tibetan grammar. In 1745 CE, he gave the emperor tantric teachings and conferred the empowerment of his yidam, Chakrasamvara. In his famous remark, Emperor Qianlong said to Changkya Rolpai Dorje: “Now you are not only my lama, you are my vajra master.” Changkya Rolpai Dorje also played a significant role in presenting Emperor Qianlong as an emanation of Manjushri. In pictorial representations, Emperor Qianlong is seen as the spiritual heir of Kublai Khan. Such images highlight the similarities between Emperor Qianlong and Manjushri, as the emperor is depicted holding the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra and the flaming wisdom sword of Manjushri. Changkya Rolpai Dorje’s written works consist of seven large volumes containing almost 200 texts. In addition, he supervised and translated the Kangyur into Manchu (108 volumes), and the entire Tengyur (224 volumes) into Mongolian to spread Tibetan Buddhism.

 

The 6th Dalai Lama’s Exile on Mount Wutai

The 6th Dalai Lama, Tsangyang Gyatso

His Holiness the 6th Dalai Lama, Tsangyang Gyatso

The 6th Dalai Lama, Tsangyang Gyatso (1683-1706 CE) was a controversial figure who preferred archery and women as opposed to his religious duties. This preference almost cost him his life as it was planned that he would die in custody, en route to the imperial capital, because Emperor Kangxi considered him to be an illegitimate lama. Legend has it that the 6th Dalai Lama was saved by Manjushri, and lived in meditative exile in a cave on Mount Wutai with his female attendant until the day he died. The cave where he lived is called the Avalokiteshvara Cave (观音洞) and is now a popular pilgrimage destination.

Avalokiteshvara Cave. According to the legend, the 6th Dalai Lama spent his time in meditation inside this cave.

Avalokiteshvara Cave. According to the legend, the 6th Dalai Lama spent his time in meditation inside this cave.

 

Go to Mount Wutai’s Peaks >>

Back to Tabs

Peaks Of Mount Wutai

Mount Wutai

Mount Wutai

Mount Wutai is a pilgrimage site for international visitors from various backgrounds. It is an interesting place of religious tolerance and understanding because it has been influenced by various Buddhist schools and cultures including China, Mongolia and Tibet.

A pilgrim prostrating on Mount Wutai

A pilgrim prostrating on Mount Wutai.

Today, many pilgrims visit Mount Wutai annually to accumulate merit for themselves and their deceased relatives. They also do so to pray for the fulfilment of their more secular wishes such as wealth and good fortune, purification of sins, and recovery from illness. Even to this day, some Chinese and Mongolian pilgrims still make prostrations throughout the entire length of their journey to the mountain, a journey that could take several years.

There are several holy structures, dating from the earliest periods of Mount Wutai’s history, that have survived the test of time. For example, the main hall of the Foguang Temple (佛光寺), built in 857 CE, is one of the oldest wooden structures in China. Another ancient structure on Mount Wutai is the main hall of the Nanchan Temple (南禅寺大殿), which was originally built around 782 CE and was renovated between 1974 and 1975.

 

Location of the Five Peaks Mountain

Mount Wutai is situated in the northeastern part of Shanxi Province, approximately 230 km (143 mi) away from Taiyuan, the province’s capital city. It covers an area of 2,837 square km (1,762.8 mi), and its five main peaks are located in the east, south, west, north, and in the middle, creating a harmonious and beautiful view. As such, pilgrims can enjoy breathtaking views from the peaks at various different angles. The peaks of the mountain are known as: Wanghai Peak (望海峰) in the east, Guayue Peak (挂月峰) in the west, Jinxiu Peak (锦绣峰) in the south, Yedou Peak (叶斗峰) in the north, and Cuishi Peak (翠石峰) in the centre.

 

Wanghai Peak in the East

Wanghai Peak, the eastern peak of Mount Wutai

Wanghai Peak, the eastern peak of Mount Wutai.

Wanghai Peak, also known as the Peak of Watching the Sea, is located 1 km (0.6 mi) east of Taihuai Town in Wutai County. It overlooks the sea and is 2,795 m (9,169 ft) above sea level. While standing on the peak, visitors can enjoy the beautiful view of thousands of golden rays during sunrise and a sea of floating clouds. On this peak, Four-armed Manjushri or Manjughosa Tiksna, is believed to reside. Wanghai Temple (望海寺) is located here and houses a Manjughosa Tiksna image.

 

Guayue Peak in the West

Guayue Peak, the western peak of Mount Wutai

Guayue Peak, the western peak of Mount Wutai.

Guayue Peak, also known as Hanging Moon Peak, is located 13 km (8.1 mi) west of Taihuai Town and is 2,773 m (9,097 ft) above sea level. The best time to climb Guayue Peak is on a full moon night, when visitors can enjoy the peaceful view of moonlight above the dense pine trees. Vadisimha Manjushri, who is depicted seated on a lion, is believed to reside on this peak. Falei Temple (法雷寺) is located on this peak and houses the Vadisimha Manjushri image.

 

Jinxiu Peak in the South

Jinxiu Peak, the southern peak of Mount Wutai

Jinxiu Peak, the southern peak of Mount Wutai.

Jinxiu Peak, also known as Splendour Peak, is located 12 km (7.5 mi) south of Taihuai Town and is 2,485 m (8,152 ft) above sea level. From the summit of Jinxiu Peak, visitors can enjoy the beautiful view of colourful, sweet-scented flowers all over the peak. The best time to visit this peak is from early-May until late-August when most of the flowers will be in bloom, releasing their fragrance. The white form of Manjushri called Jvanasattva is believed to reside on this peak. Puji Temple (普济寺) is located here and houses a Jvanasattva statue.

 

Yedou Peak in the North

Yedou Peak, the northern peak of Mount Wutai

Yedou Peak, the northern peak of Mount Wutai.

Yedou Peak, also known as the Peak of Flourishing Leaves, is the highest point of Mount Wutai at 3,058 m (10,032 ft) above sea level. It is located 5 km (3.2 mi) north of Taihuai Town. The peak overlooks a natural pool of over 300 square m (984.3 square ft) as well as wonderful and endless greenery. Vimala Manjushri is believed to reside on this peak. Ling Ying Temple (灵应寺) is located here and houses a Vimala Manjushri image.

 

Cuishi Peak in the Centre

Cuiyan Peak, the central peak of Mount Wutai

Cuishi Peak, the central peak of Mount Wutai.

The view from this peak is spectacular. Green moss covers the surface of rocks and makes them resemble moving dragons when light is reflected on them. Hence, the rocks were given the name ‘dragon writhing rocks’, while the plateau is also known as Peak of Green rocks. It sits at 2,894 m (9.494 ft) above sea level. Manjushri Natha, a form of Manjushri depicted wielding a sword, is believed to reside on this peak. Yanjiao Temple (演教寺) is located here and houses a Manjushri Natha image.

 

Go to Major Sites >>

Back to Tabs

The Major Sites

There are over 53 pilgrimage sites on Mount Wutai. These places of worship include the famous Great White Stupa (大白塔), Nanshan Temple (南山寺), Xiantong Temple (显通寺), Pusading Temple, and Foguang Temple (佛光寺).
 

Inner Mount Wutai

On Inner Mount Wutai, there many Buddhist temples, and sacred caves including Xiantong Temple, Shuxiang Temple (殊像寺), Shouning Temple (壽寧寺), Bishan Temple (碧山寺), Puhua Temple(普化寺), Dailuo Peak (黛螺顶), Qixian Temple, Shifang Tang (十方堂), Guangzong Temple, Youguo Temple (佑國寺), Guanyin Dong (Avalokiteshvara Cave), Longhua Temple, Luohou Temple (罗喉寺), Jinge Temple, Zhanshan Temple, Wanfo Temple, Guanhai Temple, Zhulin Temple, Jifu Temple, Gufo Temple, and many others.

 

Outer Mount Wutai

On Outer Mount Wutai, there are even more temples including Yanqing Temple (延慶寺), Nanchan Temple (南禅寺), Mimi Temple (秘密寺), Yanshan Temple (岩山寺), Zunsheng Temple (尊圣寺), Guangji Temple (广济寺), and many others.

The followings are information about selected places of interest on Mount Wutai:

 

The Great White Stupa in Tayuan Temple (塔院寺)

The Great White Pagoda

The Great White Stupa

During the reign of Emperor Ashoka, he had 84,000 stupas constructed all over the world, and each of them contained Buddha’s relics. According to the legend, in the 60s CE, Emperor Ming (漢明帝) of the Han Dynasty had a dream of an enlightened being that lived in India. Therefore, he sent a delegation to search for this master. When the delegation reached the present-day Afghanistan, they acquired many Buddhist texts and statues and met with two Indian Buddhist masters, one of them was called Dharmavaya (Motong). The delegation invited the Indian masters to China. After they had arrived in China, the Indian masters visited Mount Wutai. They used their clairvoyance and discovered that it was the abode of Manjushri, and there was a stupa that was originally built by Emperor Ashoka that contained the Buddha’s bone relics. The stupa name was Cishou-ta (慈寿塔). During the Yuan Dynasty, the 50-m (164 ft) Great White Stupa that contained Cishou-ta was constructed with the help and design from Chogyel Pakpa Lodro’s protégé, Anige, a Nepalese artist who was the head of the Mongolian imperial workshop. Twenty-two years before the event, in 1279 CE, Anige had built a similar stupa in Beijing to commemorate the beginning of the Yuan Dynasty.

Buddha Shakyamuni’s footprints replica in one of the shrines at the base of the Great White Stupa.

Buddha Shakyamuni’s footprints replica in one of the shrines at the base of the Great White Stupa.

Initially, the stupa was a part of Xiantong Temple. However, in 1407 CE, Emperor Yongle of the Ming Dynasty issued an edict that made the stupa’s location an independent temple site. Much later, in 1579, the temple site was restored and expanded by imperial decree. The latest renovation of the structure was undertaken in 1952 CE with the Central Government’s financial support.

The vase-like stupa was based on the structure of a Tibetan stupa, instead of the conservative Chinese pagoda structure. The main body is made of brick slabs, the octagonal base is made of stone, and the conical spire is made of seasoned bronze. The stupa has a lime coating on the outside. The surface is adorned with delicate decorations and many fine copper embellishments. The parasol and the pinnacle are made of gilt copper. The Great White Stupa is also known as the Ashoka Stupa, the Shakyamuni Relic Pagoda, and the Great Compassion Life Lengthening Pagoda.

Pilgrims turned the prayer wheels at the base of the Great White Stupa.

Pilgrims turned the prayer wheels at the base of the Great White Stupa.

The stupa is surrounded by Tibetan prayer wheels, and at its base, there are several small shrines. One of these shrines contains a stone with Buddha’s footprints engraved on it. According to the legend, before he entered Parinirvana, Buddha Shakyamuni left his footprints in India and said to one of his disciples, Ananda, “In the future, whoever sees these footprints which I leave for beings to pay homage to, shall be blessed and have their negativities purified.” When he traveled to India, Master Xuanzang (602 – 664 CE) made a copy of the footprints to be brought to China. Emperor Taizong of the Tang Dynasty later instructed that the footprints be engraved on a stone.

 

Manjushri’s Hair Stupa

Manjushri’s Hair Stupa

Manjushri’s Hair Stupa.

Near the Great White Stupa, there is a smaller stupa about 4.57 m (15 ft) tall that is said to contain Manjushri’s Hair. According to the legend, hundreds of years ago, Xiangtong Temple was hosting a charity event in the third lunar month where visiting sponsors were given free meals. During that event, an old pregnant woman came with a child, a baby, and a dog that was following her. Because she did not have any money, she cut and offered her hair instead. The woman then asked for a meal ahead of the arranged time. A monk gave two lunch boxes for her and her older child. The woman was not satisfied and asked for another share of meal for her baby. Although he was upset, the monk gave the woman another meal portion. Upon getting the extra portion, the woman asked for another share of meal for the dog that was following her. By this time, the monk was irritated and scolded the woman for being greedy. Suddenly, the dog was transformed into a snow lion. The child and the baby were transformed into two youthful attendants, and the woman transformed into Manjushri who said “The mind reacts to thousands of conditions involuntarily. First, train your equanimity. … how would you still have a wavering mind of attachment to some and hostility towards some others?” Then, the four of them flew away in front of over 1,000 people who were in attendance. Everybody was amazed and prostrated simultaneously.

The memorial plate that illustrates the story of the old woman who transformed into Manjushri.

The memorial plate that illustrates the story of the old woman who transformed into Manjushri.

The monks who scolded the woman tried to pull his eyes in deep regret. He was remorseful for not being able to recognise the great Buddha of Wisdom who was in front of him. His colleagues suggested him to build a stupa instead to enshrine the hair that was left by the woman. To some people, the hair looked like an ordinary human hair, while to others, the hair looked like golden threads. During the time of the incident, Xiangtong and Tayuan temples were under the same monastic administration, therefore, the stupa was erected in Tayuan Temple where the incident happened. The monk who scolded the woman built a memorial plate with a picture that described the scene of the woman when she transformed into Manjushri and flew away to remind pilgrims and visitors alike to respect and have compassion toward all sentient beings regardless of their outer physical appearances. The plate is now put at the bottom of Yuanzhao Temple‘s prayer hall entrance.

 

Yuanzhao Temple

Yuanzhao Temple

Yuanzhao Temple

During the reign of Emperor Yongle of the Ming Dynasty (r. 1402 – 1424 CE), an attained master from India, Srisa, came to China. Emperor Yongle appointed him as an imperial teacher, and he was given golden seals, banners, and parasols. Then, Master Srisa built Yuanzhao Temple. After he had passed away, his relics were enshrined in two separate stupas. One of the stupas was located near Beijing, and the other stupa was erected at the Yuanzhao Temple’s main hall. Many Tibetans who came to Mount Wutai recited the names of Manjushri 10,000 times to increase their wisdom in front of this stupa.

When Shakya Yeshe, Lama Tsongkhapa’s disciple who founded Sera Monastery, came to China, he spent sometime on Mount Wutai and bestowed novice and full ordination to Chinese monks. This event is often considered as the beginning of the spreading of Gelug lineage in China. In 1429 CE, Shakya Yeshe presided over the post-funerary rites of Emperor Yongle and his son Emperor Hongxi (洪熙) (r. 1424-1425 CE) at the request of Emperor Xuande (宣德) (r. 1425 – 1435 CE). When the ritual was performed, there were many auspicious signs that occurred such as the formation of a rainbow, falling flowers, and so forth. Emperor Xuande developed much faith in Shakya Yeshe and conferred him the title Dharma Lord of Great Compassion.

Yuanzhao Temple

Yuanzhao Temple

 

Rahula Temple (Luohou Temple)

Luohou Temple

Luohou Temple

Luohou Temple was built in the Tang Dynasty. According to the legend, Luohou Temple was built at the spot where Manjushri gave a discourse with a magic lantern. The temple was named after Rahula, Buddha Shakyamuni’s son, which in Chinese is pronounced Luo Hou Luo (罗候罗) or “a place where all living creatures can avoid torment.”

The grand temple consists of six yards, 16 halls, and more than 100 rooms. According to China Daily:

The most famous item is a wooden device in Buddhist Sutras hall, a 3-meter tall lotus, with a large, round plate carved with sea waves and 18 arhats (Bodhisattvas). There are also Buddha statues and the four deva-kings on the round platform. The wooden lotus is delicate, and when the mechanical mechanism is turned on, the lotus ‘blooms’ and you see four golden Amitabhas seated back-to-back, a spectacular sight. But when the mechanism turns, the red petals fold up and hide the Amitabhas. Lamaism followers delight in seeing the Amitabhas in the lotus and take it as a sign of luck and their [faith] in Buddhism.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/shanxi/wutaishan/2015-02/09/content_19533210.htm

The temple also has a tantric chamber with the images of Yamantaka, Mahakala, Guhyasamaja, Heruka, Kalarupa, and Palden Lhamo. Luohou Temple is a famous pilgrimage destination, especially among Mongolians.

Luohou Temple

Luohou Temple

 

Nanshan Temple

You Guo Si – The Temple of Blessed Nation

You Guo Temple or also known as the Temple of Blessed Nation.

Nanshan Temple is a large complex on Mount Wutai that was built in the Yuan Dynasty. It consists of seven terraces and is divided into three parts:

  1. You Guo Temple in the upper terrace.
  2. Shande Hall (善德堂) in the middle terrace.
  3. Jile Temple (極樂寺) in the lower terrace.

Nanshan is said to be the most beautiful temple in the area. There are no signboards in English at this temple, and the temple prohibits lay people from staying there. This policy has resulted in the temple having an atmosphere of a strict monastic life.

Sculpted bridge at Nanshan Temple

The sculpted bridge at Nanshan Temple.

 

Xiantong Temple

Xiantong Temple

Xiantong Temple

Xiantong Temple is by far the largest and the oldest among the temples on Mount Wutai. According to the legend, when the two masters who were invited by Emperor Ming’s delegation identified Mount Wutai as the abode of Buddha of Wisdom Manjushri, their wish to build a Buddhist temple encountered difficulties because Taoist masters and followers occupied the region. To mediate the situation, Emperor Ming asked the Buddhist masters and Taoist leaders to put their holy scriptures on two separate platforms and have them burned. Upon witnessing the Taoist texts were burned into ashes while the Buddhist texts remained intact, Emperor Ming gave permission to the two Buddhist masters to build a temple on Mount Wutai.

The original name of Xiangtong Temple was the Vultures Peak Monastery because it was built on a place that looked like the vulture peak in India. Emperor Ming expressed his devotion by renaming it The Great Faith Vultures’ Peak Monastery. A later emperor, most likely Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty, renamed the monastic institution as Xiantong Temple. The temple underwent major expansion during the reign of Emperor Xiaowen (魏孝文帝) (r. 471 – 499 CE) of the Northern Wei Dynasty. The expansion included twelve courtyards with a garden in the front. Therefore, it is also referred to as the Garden Temple.

Another side of Xiantong Temple

Another side of Xiantong Temple.

The temple consists of 400 rooms of various sizes that display the architectural styles of the Ming and Qing Dynasties. Inside the temple, there are three pure copper halls built during the Ming Dynasty and are engraved with fine Buddhist figurines. There are also two 13-storey bronze towers built during the Ming Dynasty beside the temple. They are covered with Buddhist figurines, decorative motifs, and various inscriptions. The temple’s Wuliang Hall houses an image of the Buddha Amitabha, as well as the Huayan Sutra Pagoda on its grounds.

The temple’s Copper Hall has a double-eave hipped gable roof. The size of the hall is proportionally harmonious with the skilfully cast statues. Ten thousand small, golden statues of Chinese deities are also enshrined in the hall. There are two copper pagodas that were built during the Ming Dynasty on the temple complex.

The Copper Hall of Xiantong Temple

The Copper Hall of Xiantong Temple.

 

Guangzong Temple

Guangzong Temple

Guangzong Temple

The stupa that contains Venerable Fazun’s relics.

The stupa that contains Venerable Fazun’s relics.

Guangzong is a temple of Chinese Gelugpa tradition that was built in 1507 CE. Within this temple complex, there is a 5.5-m (18 ft) stupa that contains the relic of the great 20th century Dharma Master, Venerable Fazun (法尊) (1902 – 1980 CE). In 1920 when he was 18 years old, Venerable Fazun came to Guangzong Temple to be ordained as a Buddhist monk. In 1924, he attended Buddhist Institute for the Study of Tibetan Language (Fojiao Zangwen Xueyuan (佛教藏文學院)) that was founded by his teacher Venerable Dayong (大勇). After studying for over one year, Venerable Fazun went to Tibet to continue his Buddhist study. Upon his return to China almost a decade later, Venerable Fazun translated many Gelugpa Buddhist texts from Tibetan into Chinese, including Je Tsongkhapa’s Lamrim Chenmo. His translation effort had created the foundation for the growth of Tibetan Buddhism in China.

 

Pusa Ding Temple

Pusa Ding Monastery

Pusa Ding Temple

Pusa Ding is a temple located on the central peak of Mount Wutai. According to the Expanded Record of the Clear and Cool Mountains (1057 – 1063 CE), the first temple in the complex, the Wenshuyuan Temple was built during the reign of Emperor Xiaowen of the Northern Wei Dynasty as a result of the frequent auspicious signs of Manjushri appearing in the area. Later, Emperor Ruizong (睿宗) (662 – 716 CE) instructed for an image of Manjushri to be built, but this proved challenging to build. The sculptor, Ansheng, failed to carve the image of Manjushri without a crack. He was only successful after asking for guidance from Manjushri himself. During the reign of Emperor Yongle of the Ming Dynasty, the temple was renamed Pusa Ding or the Bodhisattva Peak (also known as the Manjushri Peak).

The entrance to Pusa Ding Temple.

The entrance to Pusa Ding Temple.

The temple complex includes the Dawenshu-dian (大文殊殿), the first temple to house a copy of the Yongle edition of the Tibetan Buddhist Canon or Kangyur, which was completed in 1410 CE. The copy of this Kangyur is also housed in Luohou Temple. At present, Dawenshu-Dian is referred to as Pusa Ding.

During the Qing Emperor Shunzhi’s reign (1644 – 1661 CE), Pusa Ding was extensively renovated with the aim of turning it into an official residence for prominent Tibetan Buddhist monks. Unlike other temple in the area, the roof of Pusa Ding Temple is golden, the colour that was preserved for the Chinese monarchy. The permission to use this colour was given because two emperors had stayed in the temple previously. Emperor Kangxi and Emperor Qianlong visited the temple four and two times respectively.

According to the legend, when Emperor Kangxi was visiting Mount Wutai on a pilgrimage, he saw a naked monk who was bathing while there were women in the area. Emperor Kangxi felt that the monk’s behaviour was a disgrace. He then shot an arrow, which hit the monk in his right shoulder. The monk escaped. Emperor Kangxi chased after him by following the trail of blood, which led him to the western chamber of Pusa Ding prayer hall. Emperor Kangxi saw a Manjushri statue with an arrow on his right shoulder. The emperor realised that the monk was none other than Manjushri who manifested as a monk to create awareness about the hall’s deteriorating condition. Emperor Kangxi granted the fund for renovation, and the statue became famous. In 1908 CE, the 13th Dalai Lama took the arrow from Manjushri’s shoulder because he could not bear to see the holy Manjushri statue being pierced by an arrow.

In the Manjushri Hall, there is a replica of Bodhi tree painting by Emperor Qianlong. In 1780 CE, His Holiness the 6th Panchen Lama visited Emperor Qianlong on his 70th birthday. To show his devotion, Emperor Qianlong changed to lay Buddhist robe and painted the Bodhi tree as an offering to his teacher, the Panchen Lama.

 

Bishan Puji Zen Temple of Ten Directions (Bishan Temple)

The entrance to Bishan Temple.

The entrance to Bishan Temple.

Bishan is a Zen temple that was originally built during the reign of Emperor Xiaowen of the Northern Wei Dynasty. The temple was later rebuilt under the reign of Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty. Bishan Temple is unique because the monks elected the abbot, and he was not allowed to have any formal disciples. This policy is to ascertain that the temple continues to belong to the sangha members who are staying at the temple. Bishan Temple provides free room and board to the visiting sangha and often helps them with transportation fee when they leave.

 

Baiyun Temple (白云寺)

Baiyun Temple

Baiyun Temple

In the Tang Dynasty, a government official named Daotai built Baiyun Temple to express his gratitude to Manjushri for curing his mother. According to the legend, when his mother was seriously ill, Daotai was looking for a potent cure for her to no avail. On one occasion, he met a monk who predicted that his mother would pass away in the near future. Daotai immediately knew that this monk was not an ordinary person and begged him to help his mother. The monk went to his house and did some hand movements over Daotai’s mother. Not long after, the old lady recovered. Daotai was very grateful to the monk and asked him about his identity. The monk responded that he came from Baiyun Temple on Mount Wutai. To repay the monk’s kindness, Daotai traveled to Mount Wutai to search for him. However, he could not find a temple by the name of Baiyun. When he was about to give up, he saw a thick lotus-shape white cloud over his head with Manjushri riding on a lion on top of the cloud. He immediately understood that the monk was the emanation of Manjushri, and he was supposed to build the temple. Daotai then built the magnificent Baiyun Temple.

In the 18th century, Baiyun Temple experienced several natural disasters including a big fire. The temple was seriously damaged during the Cultural Revolution. Under the leadership of Venerable Changlong, the temple was undergoing a 15-year restoration to revive its former glory and became a nunnery.

Bodhisattva Pavilion at Baiyun Temple.

Bodhisattva Pavilion at Baiyun Temple.

One of the halls at Baiyun Temple.

One of the halls at Baiyun Temple.

Buddha images at the Pureland Rebirths Hall, Baiyun Temple.

Buddha images at the Pureland Rebirths Hall, Baiyun Temple.

 

Fomu Cave (The Mother Womb Cave) (佛母洞)

Fomu Cave during winter time.

Fomu Cave during winter time.

Fomu Cave

Fomu Cave

Fomu Cave is a naturally formed cave in the shave of a triangular hole. The inner cave is believed to be the manifestation of Vajrayogini’s womb. It is said that Changkya Rolpai Dorje meditated on Vajrayogini in this cave and had the vision of the divine lady:

On the rock ceiling at the entrance of the cave, one would see a naturally formed triangular sanctum through a small opening to emerge again from the inner sanctum through the same hole again, to symbolically go through the birth process from Vajrayogini (Vajravarahi)’s womb. The inner cave is said to resemble a womb with a rock formation that resembles the ribs and the organs and the shape of the opening bears a resemblance of the vagina. The famous Jangya Rinpoche [Changkya Rolpai Dorje], the lama of Emperor Chien-Lung [Qianlong], meditated on Naropa lineage of Vajrayogini (Narokhadro) here and attained the inner dakini pure land state. He had a vision of Vajrayogini and when he emerged from the cave, every person he saw was a daka or a dakini to him and everywhere he went appeared to him as the mandala of the deity. It is possible to do dakini tsog or other practises outside the cave with offerings set up inside. Recently, a group performed tsog here and there was a flower rain followed by a gentle hail storm. The event was talk-of-the-town for many days.

http://www.b-i-a.net/Wutaisan.htm

Instructions on how to get into Fomu Cave.

Instructions on how to get into Fomu Cave.

In 1996, a Chinese monk named Beiyue (悲月) had fundraised over one million yuan to build a path that led to the cave. According to Dilowa Khutugtu, a Chinese monk that assist the pilgrims to get into the cave:

To enter the grotto, the pilgrim would first insert his right arm and his head. The priest would stand below the hole, facing the entrance. The visitor would step on the priest’s shoulder and try to enter the hole by extending his right arm and squeezing his right shoulder through. When he had proceeded so far, he would brace his feet against the shoulders of the priest in order to gain thrust enough to enter the grotto completely.

Then the pilgrim would find himself in a very narrow but widening passage, some three feet long and one foot high, which may be termed as the cervix. Bending and twisting to the left, the tube led into the inner chamber, the matrix which allowed room for two people to stand. In its centre was an altar bearing a stone statue of a deity, possibly Tara or Kuan-yin [Guanyin], both goddesses of mercy and salvation.

Isabelle Charleux, Nomads on Pilgrimage: Mongols on Wutaishan (China), 1800-1940

In 1846 CE, Gelong Lhundrup, a Mongolian lama, crafted a map on Mount Wutai in Cifu Temple (慈福寺). The map is known as Cifusi Map. The map illustrated approximately 130 temples within Mount Wutai area, with inscriptions, painting of divine emanations, rituals, pilgrimage activities, and festivals. On Cifusi Map, there is an image of Vajrayogini near Fomu Cave. In her book, Nomads on Pilgrimage: Mongols on Wutaishan (China), 1800 – 1940, Isabelle Charleux mentioned that:

… the Cifusi map depicts an apparition of naked red Vajrayogini drinking blood out of a human skull in a cloud above Zhenhaisi, just below the cave.

Due to the connection with Vajrayogini, many pilgrims visited the sacred Fomu Cave every year.

Cifusi map that contain an image of Vajrayogini near the Fomu Cave.

Cifusi map that contain an image of Vajrayogini near Fomu Cave. Click to enlarge.

 

Foguang Temple

Foguang Temple

Foguang Temple

Foguang Temple is located 5 km from Doucun, Wutai County, in Shanxi Province. It was built during the Tang Dynasty in 857 CE. The temple consists primarily of two halls, namely the Great Eastern Hall that was built in 857 and Manjushri Hall that was built in 1137 CE. In addition the second oldest existing pagoda in China, Zushi Pagoda (祖师塔) is housed on its grounds, and dates back to the 6th century. Located south of the Great Eastern Hall, the pagoda is presumed to contain the tomb of the temple’s founder. The pagoda is white in colour, hexagonal in shape, and is decorated with lotus petals.

The Zushi Pagoda

The Zushi Pagoda

Originally built during the Northern Wei Dynasty, the temple took 35 years to complete, from 785 to 820 CE. Unfortunately, in 845 CE, Emperor Wuzong (武宗) (r. 840 – 846 CE) had the whole temple destroyed by fire as part of his campaign to ban Buddhism in the country. Only Zushi Pagoda survived his destructive campaign. In 857 CE, the temple was rebuilt with the financial support of a woman named Ning Gongyu (宁公遇). Much of the rebuilding effort was focused on the Great Eastern Hall. In the 10th century, an image of the Foguang Temple resurfaced on the painting in cave 61 of the Mogao Caves, Duhuang City. The existence of the Foguang image in the cave served to emphasise its importance as a holy site for Buddhist pilgrims to visit.

Later in 1137, during the Jin Dynasty (1115 – 1234 CE), the Manjushri Hall and another hall dedicated to Samantabhadra were constructed on the temple’s north and south sides respectively. Unfortunately, the Samantabhadra Hall was burnt down during the time of the Qing Dynasty. The Manjushri Hall is roughly the same size as the Eastern Hall and is located on an 83 cm (2.7 ft) high platform with three front doors and one central back door, and it features a single-eave hipped gable roof. All four walls are filled with murals of arhats painted in 1429 CE during the time of the Ming Dynasty.

Manjushri Hall that was constructed in 1137 CE.

The Great Eastern Hall is located on the far eastern side of the temple, on top of a large stone platform. The simplicity of its structure is striking. It is supported by inner and outer sets of columns. Special emphasis was given to the complexity of the roof, and as such the hall has a lattice ceiling that covers much of the roof frame from view.

The hall has 36 sculptures and murals on each wall dating from the Tang Dynasty and later periods. In the middle of the hall, there are three large statues of Buddha Shakyamuni, Amitabha, and Maitreya, all seated on lotus seats. Four assistants and two bodhisattvas guard each Buddha. There are also statues of Manjushri riding on a lion and Samantabhadra on an elephant next to the platform. The artistic temple also contains a large mural that portrays the Buddha’s previous lives.

 

Nanchan Temple

The Great Buddha Hall of Nanchan Temple

The Great Buddha Hall of Nanchan Temple.

The Nanchan Temple is located near Doucun Town on Mount Wutai. The temple was built in 782 during the Tang Dynasty. Nanchan is regarded as an important architectural site that contains an original set of artistically important Tang sculptures. Its Great Buddha Hall is China’s oldest preserved timber building, and it survived the purge initiated by Emperor Wuzong in 845 CE due to its isolated location. The hall’s interior has seventeen sculptures with a small stone pagoda.

Buddha Shakyamuni statue inside the Great Buddha Hall

Buddha Shakyamuni statue inside the Great Buddha Hall.

The Nanchan Temple houses original images carved during the time of the Tang Dynasty. The temple contains 17 statues that are lined up in the form of an inverted ‘U’. At the centre of the hall, there is a large image of Buddha Shakyamuni sitting on a throne surrounded by sculpted images of a lion and a demigod. A large statue of Samantabhadra riding on an elephant is placed on the far left of the hall, while a large statue of Manjushri riding on a lion is placed on the far right. There are also images of two of Buddha Shakyamuni’s disciples (Ananda and Mahakashyapa), two statues of heavenly kings and four statues of attendants. In addition, the hall has a small five-tiered stone pagoda with Buddha images carved on each tier.

 

Pushou Nunnery (普寿寺)

Pushou Nunnery

Pushou Nunnery

Pushou Nunnery was originally built during the time of the Song (宋) Dynasty (960 – 1279 CE). In the early 20th century, a monk named Yonten Lama rebuilt the monastery and offered it to His Holiness the 13th Dalai Lama. His Holiness stayed and gave teachings in the monastery for six months. During the Cultural Revolution, the premise was destroyed and turned into a hospital.

In 1991, a Buddhist nun, Ru Rui (如瑞法师) turned the hospital into a nunnery. Today, Pushou Nunnery is the home of approximately 1,300 nuns.

Students line up in front of Pushou Nunnery’s main hall.

Students line up in front of Pushou Nunnery’s main hall.

Venerable Ru Rui, the founder of Pushou Nunnery.

Venerable Ru Rui, the founder of Pushou Nunnery.

 

Vajra Cave (金剛窟)

Buddhapali’s meeting with an old man who was the emanation of Manjushri on Mount Wutai.

Buddhapali’s meeting with an old man who was the emanation of Manjushri on Mount Wutai.

Vajra Cave was one of the cave on Mount Wutai that was first excavated during the time of the Tang Dynasty. According to the historical records founded in Wutai Shan Zan, a checklist of the key sights found among the manuscripts at Dunhuang, there was an interesting story related to Vajra Cave. In the late 7th century, there was a monk named Buddhapali who travelled to Mount Wutai on pilgrimage. When he arrived on Mount Wutai, Buddhapali met an old man who asked him to return to his hometown and retrieve a Namgyalma text (Foding Zunsheng Tuoluoni Jing). Buddhapali complied with the request and came back with the requested scripture. Manjushri greeted him in his true form and led Buddhapali to the Vajra Cave, where it is said that Buddhapali remained forever.

According to the book titled The Journey of Maps and Images on the Silk Road, Manjushri appeared to Buddhapali in his true form due to Buddhapali’s gesture of respect at their first encounter:

At their first encounter, Buddhapali does not know who the old man is, and it is his gesture of respect and willingness to do the old man’s bidding that ensures his special treatment from a revealed Manjushri when he returns. Thus the story turns on faith in what lies beyond mundane appearances, and on the rewards that come to those with such faith.

 

Dailuo Peak (Black Snail Peak)

Dailuo Peak

Dailuo Peak

Dailuo Peak is also known as big snail because a part of the peak looks like a huge snail shell. A temple with the same name that houses the statues of five Manjushri emanations is located on Dailuo Peak. The statues of each emanation are located in the directions that correspond to the main statues on the five main peaks of Mount Wutai.

In 1781 CE, Emperor Qianlong went on pilgrimage to Mount Wutai. However, due to uncooperative weather and other circumstances, he was not able to visit the five main peaks. Emperor Qianlong was frustrated and wondered whether his failure to reach the five peaks were the result of his negative karma. He then consulted an abbot of one of the temples in the area and instructed him to ensure that within the next five years, his wish to pay homage to the five forms of Manjushri would become a reality. A novice monk came up with the idea of building a separate temple and the replicas of the five Manjushri emanations on a place that is not too high on the mountain, but challenging enough for the emperor to experience physical hardship during his pilgrimage. The abbot agreed with the idea, and Dailuo Peak was chosen as the site to build this new temple. In 1786 CE, Emperor Qianlong visited Mount Wutai and was pleased with the new temple. Since then, pilgrims who were experiencing physical challenges or limited time, could come and chose to pay homage at this temple.

Dailuo Temple

Dailuo Temple

 

Shuxiang Temple

Shuxiang Temple was originally built during the Tang Dynasty, and it houses a 9 century statue of Manjushri riding on a lion. According to the diary of a Japanese monk, Venerable Ennin, the statue was sculpted based on the artist’s clairvoyance. Venerable Ennin learned that the artist had tried to cast the statue for six times, but each time he tried to do so, the statue cracked into pieces although the artist is very talented and has observed abstinence during the process of making the statue. Venerable Ennin recorded the following:

The Master said … “I humbly pray that His Holiness the Bodhisattva Monju (Manjushri) show his true appearance to me in person. If I gaze directly on his golden countenance, then I shall copy it to make [the image].” When he has finished making this prayer, he opened his eyes and saw the Bodhissattva Monju riding on a gold-coloured lion right before him. After a little while [Monju] mounted on a cloud of five colours and flew away up into space. The master, having been able to gaze on [Monju’s] true appearance, rejoiced [but also] wept bitterly, knowing then that what he had made had been incorrect. Then, changing the original appearance [of the image] he elongated or shortened, enlarged or diminished it [as necessary], so that in appearance it exactly resembled what he had seen, and the seventh time he cast the image, it did not crack and everything was easy to do, and all that he desired was fulfilled.

Patricia Berger, Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China

A 9th century statue of Manjushri riding on a lion or also known as the Real Face Manjushri.

A 9th century statue of Manjushri riding on a lion or also known as the Real Face Manjushri.

There was another interesting story related to this temple. During the time of the Qing Dynasty, the husband of an imperial princess was executed for treason, and therefore, to avoid further embarrassment, the princess was sent to live in exile in Shuxiang Temple. At the time, there was a young and handsome monk who became the princess’s friend. Their relationship was very close that rumours started to spread about the two were having an affair. The emperor decided to burn the temple to end the affair and to prevent the rumours to spread any further.

All the buildings within the temple complex were burned down except for a small house where the young monk and the princess used to meet to discuss about dharma. The emperor realised that the young monk was the emanation of Manjushri and his sister was innocent. Therefore, in an attempt to purify his negative karma of trying to kill an enlightened being and the princess, the emperor made a large donation to rebuild the temple. Since then, the temple became known as The Temple of No Stain to commemorate the relationship between the princess and the monk.

 

Banruo (Prajna) Spring

Banruo Spring

Banruo Spring

Banruo Spring is located on the side of the road where Shuxiang Temple is located. According to the legend in the past, the monks in this area had to walk long distance to get water. There was a monk who vowed to follow the advice of a holy being to do a marathon chanting of the Diamond Sutra. Ten years later, one day prior to his completion, a tiger came, and the monk halted his recitation out of fear. Several years later, another monk made the same attempt. Ten years later, two days before his completion, a tiger appeared, but the monk was unmoved. On the next day, a spirit came and threatened the monk that he will be killed if he continued the recitation. The monk was scared and terminated his retreat. Many years later, during the Tang Dynasty era, another monk was determined to do the Diamond Sutra recitation to help the monks in the area. Two days before he completed the task, a tiger came, but the monk was unafraid. On the last evening, a spirit came to threaten him, but the monk was unmoved. Before the sunrise, an elderly man came and told him that he will get his wish, but he would lose his life. The benevolent monk decided to give up his life, and proceeded to complete his recitation. At dawn, he saw water flowing from the ground where he sat. The monk laughed happily. He passed away soon after. Due to the compassion of this monks, the people who lived in the area were relieved of the water shortage problems. The spring is named Banruo Spring. The water is said to be blessed by Manjushri and could increase one’s wisdom. Due to this reputation, the water became known as Wisdom Water or the Wutai Sacred Water.

Many practitioners used the water from this spring to make offering to the Buddha, and many members of royalties have also taken water from this spring.

 

Avalokiteshvara Cave

Avalokiteshvara Cave

Avalokiteshvara Cave

Avalokiteshvara Cave is said to be the place where the 6th Dalai Lama meditated for six years after Emperor Kangxi saved him. There is a hexagonal-shape temple pavilion near the cave with three murals painted on the pillars. The first mural depicts Avalokiteshvara was rescuing a person from beasts’ attacks. The second mural depicts Avalokiteshvara was rescuing a person that is about to be attacked by a man holding a knife. The third mural depicts Avalokiteshvara was rescuing a person that was about to be attacked by his enemy with a large stone. The temple also houses a statue of an 8-armed Avalokiteshvara with 11 faces. The cave is located behind one of the temples’ corner. The cave is only sufficiently adequate for one person to sit in, and it is said that Avalokiteshvara has manifested miracles in this place. Prior to the 6th Dalai Lama’s arrival, the monks had to carry water from other places. But when His Holiness was meditating in the cave, spring water appeared naturally at the left side of the cave as one is facing the cave. It is said that the water is slightly sweet and very blessed. The 13th Dalai Lama is known to have paid homage at the cave during his visit to Mount Wutai.

 

Zhenhai Temple

Zhenhai Temple is a place of worship of Gelugpa tradition. It contained some of the ancient Indian statues including the male form of Chenrezig. The temple also contains the Changkya Stupa that contains Changkya Rolpai Dorje’s relics and the two pine trees that were planted by this great lama.

The stupa that contains the relics of Changkya Rolpai Dorje and the pine tree that was planted by this great lama.

The stupa that contains the relics of Changkya Rolpai Dorje, and the pine tree that was planted by this great lama.

Before the temple was built, there was a pond at the site that used to flood the area that killed many people. At one time, when it started to flood again, many people in the area were praying to Manjushri for divine intervention. Suddenly, there was a fireball flying across the sky toward the area. On the next day, the people in the area saw a big cooking pot that blocked the water source. After the event, a temple was established in the area and was named Zhenhai, which means ‘subduing the ocean.’

In 1786 CE, Emperor Qianlong, who was a student of Changkya Rolpai Dorje built the Changkya Stupa. When he passed away, Changkya Rolpai Dorje had requested the emperor not to make any monument to commemorate him. However, after his teacher had passed away, Emperor Qianlong insisted on building a stupa for this great lama. The stupa contains Changkya Rolpai Dorje’s relics and 70 kg of solid gold that were secured at the bottom of the stupa so they would remain intact if the stupa is destroyed due to the change of time. It is said that the stupa had emanated rainbow light rays on several occasions since it was built.

 

Jinge Temple

Jinge Temple

Jinge Temple

Jinge Temple was built during the time of Tang Dynasty after a Buddhist master Daoyi came to Mount Wutai on pilgrimage in 736 CE with another monk. According to Susan Andrews in her dissertation, Representing Mount Wutai’s Past: A Study of Chinese and Japanese Miracle Tales about the Five Terrace Mountain, “… as he wandered Daoyi met an old monk (laoseng) who had a rustic manner and was accompanied by the youth Jueyi.” The encounter was described as follows:

…[t]he youth called to [Dao]yi and asked him to enter the monastery to the east to drink tea. Thereupon they entered the monastery and worshipped at the halls. [Daoyi] saw a great pavilion with a height of three stories and nine bays wide all together. It was gold coloured and it shone brightly in his eyes. The old monk sent [Dao]yi away to return in the morning because the mountain was cold and it was difficult to dwell there. When the monk-pilgrim took one hundred steps and turned to look, the only thing he saw was a mountain grove. Thereupon, he knew this was a conjured temple.

After that meeting, Venerable Daoyi drew a detailed plan to build the temple as per his recollection. He obtained the support of the Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712 – 756), however, the temple remained incomplete for years until the Tantric master Amoghavajra decided to submit a memorial to the imperial court where he mentioned about Venerable Daoyi and the conjured temple:

As for the temple (mentioned) above [the Jinge Temple], the sage of yore (Emperor Xuanzang inscribed an official plague for it [yet it remains] incomplete. [This temple] was based on a temple that was Manjushri’s holy trace (Wenshu Shengji si) that the Quzhou monk Daoyi saw when he arrived at Mount [Wu]tai in the twenty-fourth year of the Kaiyuan era (736). It was called the Jinge Cloister (Jinge yuan). It has thirteen halls to accommodate the sangha. It is said that they numbered ten thousand. The towers, buildings, and gates were made of fine gold. [Daoyi] immediately submitted a drawing [of the structure] to the inner palace. Everyone under heaven wanted to see the Jinge Temple completed. Who among the people doesn’t wish this? … Now at the numinous mountain (lingshan), Wutai, there are five temples with plaques. [These are the Qingliang, Huayan, Foguang, and Yuhua Temples.[Construction on these] four temples was completed previously. Only the Jinge Temple, [just] this one [structure], is not yet complete.

In 766 CE, Emperor Taizong approved the request and fund required to complete Jinge Temple. There is a 51-feet 1000-armed Chenrezig statue that was carved from an old pine tree in the central hall. The body of the statue was made from the trunk of the tree, and the arms were made from the branch. It is said that this is the largest Chenrezig statue in the region.

 

Jixiang Temple

Jixiang temple was built prior to the Tang Dynasty period and have been rebuilt a number of times since. The temple houses a Manjushri statue that is unique. The Buddha of Wisdom image has a beard with the robes of a monk and holds a lantern in his hand. The facial expression of this statue is very realistic. According to the legend, during one of his visits, Emperor Kangxi was lost and arrived near this temple. Then the emperor met with an old monk who was holding a red lantern and led him to the temple before he disappeared. After that, Emperor Kangxi found an unusual statue that looked like the old monk with the lantern. This Manjushri statue then became known as ‘the Manjushri with a lantern.’

Between the 1950s and 1960s, the great Buddhist master Venerable Nanhai, who was the disciple of Pabongka Rinpoche and Khangsar Rinpoche, lived and taught in this temple. Venerable Nanhai made a great contribution for spreading Buddhist teachings from Gelug lineage.

 

Go to Visiting >>

Back to Tabs

Festivals and events on Mount Wutai

 

Mount Wutai International Tourist Month

When: can be any month between June and September
During this month, pilgrims can witness ordained monks and nuns teach practitioners about the essence of Buddhism and perform rituals in accordance with their various traditions.

 

Tiaobuza Festival

Monks performing the traditional demon pacifying dance during the Tiaobuza Festival

Monks performing the traditional demon pacifying dance during Tiaobuza Festival

Painting depicting monks carrying a Maitreya statue on Mount Wutai

Painting depicting monks carrying a Maitreya statue on Mount Wutai

When: June 6 – 15

Tiaobuza is a traditional festival celebrated in the Gelugpa Tradition. The largest celebration of the event occurs at Pusa Ding Temple, a major Gelug institution on Mount Wutai. During the festival, the monks wear masks and perform rituals dances to pacify demons to eliminate obstructions to spiritual practice. On the following day, monks play musical instruments and carry a Maitreya statue in a procession around the mountain.

 

Buddhist Cultural Festival

Dance performance during the Buddhist Cultural Festival

Dance performance during the Buddhist Cultural Festival.

Nuns performing during the Buddhist Cultural Festival

Nuns perform during Buddhist Cultural Festival.

When: 21 August – 21 September

During the festival month, visitors can enjoy various cultural activities and folk art shows, held on Mount Wutai.

 

Weather and Clothing

The best time to visit Mount Wutai is from May to September as Mount Wutai has an early Winter from October to April of the following year. The high altitude and cold climate of Mount Wutai make the winter temperature challenging for some people. During winter time, the average temperature ranges from 0°C-10°C during daylight hours. Regardless of when you visit Mount Wutai, it is advisable to bring warm clothing (e.g., coats, jackets, sweaters), an umbrella and sunscreen.

 

Travel Documents

Passports

Visitors who wish to tour Mount Wutai in China should make sure their passports are valid for at least 6 months. Foreigners should have their passports with them at all times because police officers carry out identification checks from time to time, especially if there are special events going on. Those who are going to Tibet are strongly advised to join a travel group. Individual applicants also need to show their existing Chinese visas.

Visas

China requires all nationals to have visas to enter China, with the exception of:

  • Selected nationals (i.e., from Australia, Britain, Canada, the United States and other European Union countries) can visit the Pearl River Delta for up to six days as part of an organised tour group from Hong Kong or Macau.
  • Nationals from Australia, Canada, Austria, Denmark, France, Finland, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the U.K. and the United States, can visit Hainan Province as part of an organised tour group and stay up to 15 days (or 21 days for German nationals only).

 

  • When applying for a visa, a detailed itinerary and information on the places, hotel bookings, dates of arrival and departure should be included.
  • Official invitation from a legal company or institution in China is required when applying for a business visa.
  • Within 24 hours upon arrival, visitors should report to the Chinese Public Security Bureau.

Please contact your local Chinese Embassy for further information if necessary.

 

How to Get There

The Map of Mount Wutai. Click to enlarge.

Entrance fee: RMB 218 (adult) RMB 134 (child)
Opening hours: 6.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m.
Best time to visit: May to September

By plane

Visitors can take flights from Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Chengdu, Guilin, Nanjing, Shenyang, Xi An and other main cities to Taiyuan. The airport in Taiyuan is called Taiyuan Wuxu International Airport. Various means of public transport (e.g., airport shuttle, public buses no. 201 and 901, coach, and helicopter) to and from the airport are available.

By train
Mount Wutai train station is located at Shahe Town, Fanzhi County. The trains can take you to Beijing, Taiyuan, Datong and other cities.

By bus
During the peak season, there are long-distance buses from Beijing Liu Liqiao Bus Station, Shijiazhuang Bus Station, and Datong Bus Station to Mount Wutai.

By car
If you take a car from Beijing, drive on the Jingshi Express. Then, take the exit at Baoding and drive pass Shunping, Tangxian, and Fuping. Eventually, you will reach Mount Wutai Road.

To travel from Taiyuan to Mount Wutai, take the Yuantai Express and exit at Jinzhou. Then, drive through Dingxiang, Wutai County, Rucun Village, Qingshui River, and the south entrance of Mount Wutai to get to Taihuai County.

 

Getting to the Peaks and Monasteries

The journey to the Five Peaks starts at the foot of Dailuo Peak, Taihuai village at 7:00 a.m. by minibus. The fee is approximately RMB 70 to go to one peak or you can take a five-peak package for the price of RMB 350. The trip to all five peaks will take about 8.5 hours. The minibus will make a 30-minute stop at each peak.

Get ready to spend the majority of the time on bumpy roads when riding on the minibus. Once you arrive at the North Peak, the air becomes much thinner, and it is colder and more windy.

If you decide to visit only one peak, you can consider the South Peak as it is well-known for its beautiful scenery and mild weather. Another good option is to go to the Central Peak or the West Peak to see the beautiful flowers. Other than the minibus, you can also make a deal with a taxi driver to drive you around.

Food for visitors may not be available on the peaks. Therefore, it might be a good idea to prepare your own snacks. Many of the toilets on the peaks are squat toilets.

Although visiting monasteries on Mount Wutai is generally free, some of the larger monasteries might charge a small entrance fee of about RMB 10.

 

Pusa Peak, Xiangtong Temple, and Taiyuan Temple

Pusa Peak is situated to the north of Xiantong Temple and Taiyuan Temple. These two famous temples are located to the west of Qingshui River. The best way to get there is to ask for directions from the green bus drivers. Most likely, they will point to the free brown minibuses that will take you right up to the peak. The two temples are within walking distance to some other famous temples such as Luohou Temple, Yuanzhao Temple, Guangzong Temple, Pusa Ding Temple, Pushou Nunnery, and Vajra Cave.

 

Dailuo Peak

You can take a cable car to go up and down the peak for RMB 30. If you prefer to have the experience of travelling like they used to in the ancient times, there are some horses that you can rent. The ticket office for the ride on the minibuses is located at the foot of Dailuo Peak.

 

Nanshan Temple

To go to the Nanshan Temple, take the green bus and exit at Nanshan Temple Bridge. From there, you will spend approximately 20 minutes walking to the temple.

 

Zhenhai Temple, Baiyun Temple, and Fomu Cave

The green bus can take you to the Zhenhai Temple if you head south from Taihuai Village. Zhenhai Temple is also the last stop for the green bus. If you wish to go to Mingyue Well, Baiyun Temple or Fomu Cave, you can take the smaller brown minibus from Zhenhai Temple or a chartered car.

From the Baiyun Temple, there are no free minibuses that go to Fomu Cave. You have the option of riding in a taxi which will take you to the steps of Fomu Cave or you can walk there which will take less than one hour. It will take about one hour to climb the steps to Fomu Cave. Visitors will have to wait in line to enter the cave, and the queue can last between two hours during weekdays and seven to eight hours during weekends.

The Pilgrims and visitors were waiting for their turn to see Fomu Cave.

The Pilgrims and visitors were waiting for their turn to see Fomu Cave.

 

Suggested Itinerary

Today, there are travel agents that offer tours to Mount Wutai. The itinerary may vary depending on the purpose of the visit and the length of stay. However, the followings are the suggested itinerary for a-four-day and three-night stay:

Day 1: Check into the hotel and pay homage to the temples within Tai-Huai region as they are within walking distance (i.e., The Great White Stupa, Manjushri’s Hair Stupa, Luohou Temple, Xiantong Temple, Yuanzhao Temple, Guangzong Temple, Pusa Ding Temple, Pushou Nunnery, and Vajra Cave). If you do not spend too much time at each site, you may be able to go to Dailuo Peak and pay homage to the five forms of Manjushri.

Day 2: Visit all five peaks, Jinge Temple, and Jixiang temple.

Day 3: If you did not have the chance to go to Dailuo Peak on the first day, you can start at dawn and visit the peak. Then you can go by chartered car to visit Banruo Spring, Shuxiang Temple, Avalokiteshvara Cave, Zhenhai Temple, Baiyun Temple, and Fomu Cave. The visit to Fomu Cave can be exhausting, therefore, it is suggested that you go to visit other places first before visiting this sacred cave.

Day 4: Prayers, leisure time, and departure.

If you want to spend more time at each place, it is advisable to extend your visit accordingly.

 

Accommodation

There are several accommodation options you can consider when visiting Mount Wutai. It is recommended that you do further research to find accommodation that is suitable for your needs.

 
1. Wutai Mountain Marriott Hotel
Address:
No.300 Daganhe Village 1st Alley
Jin’gangku Town, Wutai Mountain
Wutai County 035514, China

Phone: +86 350 331 8888
Website: http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/tynwm-wutai-mountain-marriott-hotel/

 
2. Futai Hotel
Address:
Mingqing Street
Taihuai Town, Xinzhou
Shanxi 035500, China

Phone: +86 350 654 2906

 
3. Wutai Mountain Yunlong International Hotel
Address:
Next to the Wutai Mountain Bus Station, Wutai Mountain
Shanxi 035500, China

Phone: +86 350 654 3166
Website: http://www.wtsyljd.com

 

Back to Tabs


 

Sources of information:

  • Foret, Philippe and Kaplony, Andreas. The Journey of Maps and Images on the Silk Road. Brill Academic Publishers, 2008, http://books.google.com
  • Berger, Patricia Ann. Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China. University of Hawaii Press, 2003, http://books.google.com
  • Andrews, Susan. Representing Mount Wutai’s Past: A Study of Chinese and Japanese Miracle tales about the Five Terrace Mountain. 2013, Columbia University.
  • Charleux, Isabelle. Nomads on Pilgrimage: Mongols on Wutaishan (China), 1800 – 1940. Brill, 2015, http://books.google.com
  • Poceski, Mario. Ordinary Mind As The Way. Oxford University Press, 2007, PDF.
  • Cartelli, Mary Anne. The Five-Colored Clouds of Mount Wutai: Poems from Dunhuang. Brill, 2012, http://books.google.com
  • Molk, David. Lion of Siddhas: The Life and Teachings of Padampa Sangye. Snow Lion, 2008, http://books.google.com
  • http://sukhasights.blogspot.my/2013/01/the-symbol-of-wutaishan-white-relic.html
  • http://treasuryoflives.org/biographies/view/Shakya-Yeshe/5795
  • http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/shanxi/wutaishan/2015-02/09/content_19533210.htm
  • http://www.b-i-a.net/Wutaisan.htm
  • http://www.szdaily.com/content/2015-04/06/content_11414927.htm
  • http://www.thlib.org/collections/texts/jiats/#!jiats=/02/tuttle/b2/
  • http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/shanxi/wutaishan/2016-08/15/content_27393753.htm
  • https://lamas-and-emperors.wikischolars.columbia.edu/Wutaishan%27s+Panoramic+Map-Cifusi
  • http://www.szdaily.com/content/2015-03/09/content_11271119.htm
  • http://wikitravel.org/en/Wutaishan_National_Park
  • http://www.beijingattractions.org/Beijing-History/Qing-Emperor-History.html
  • http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/shanxi/wutaishan/2014-10/20/content_18772156.htm
  • http://www.asianart.com/articles/tsakli-casey/index.html
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Wutai
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhima%E1%B9%87%E1%B8%8Da
  • https://sacredsites.com/asia/china/sacred_mountains.html
  • http://www.esoterichanmi.com/history/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tang_dynasty#Religion_and_philosophy
  • http://www.thlib.org/collections/texts/jiats/#!jiats=/06/debreczeny/b5/
  • http://www.gis-reseau-asie.org/article-en/months-articles-archive/reseau-asie-s-editorial/charleux-wutaishan-mongol/
  • http://www.thlib.org/collections/texts/jiats/#!jiats=/06/debreczeny/b5/
  • http://www.treasuryoflives.org/biographies/view/Padampa-Sanggye-/2510
  • http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/wutai/pd01.html
  • http://sukhasights.blogspot.my/2013/01/the-past-glorious-temple-baiyun-si.html
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Changkya_R%C3%B6lp%C3%A9_Dorj%C3%A9#Lama_of_the_Qianlong_Emperor
  • http://www.tamqui.com/buddhaworld/Manjusri
  • https://www.britannica.com/place/Mount-Wutai
  • https://www.travelblog.org/Asia/China/blog-30972.html
  • http://wikitravel.org/en/Wutaishan_National_Park
  • https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/art-architecture/wu-tai-shan-2.html
  • http://www.chinadiscovery.com/wutaishan-tours/weather.html
  • http://www.worldtravelguide.net/china/passport-visa
  • https://www.travelchinaguide.com/attraction/shanxi/taiyuan/mt_wutai.htm
  • http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/shanxi/2012-03/12/content_14825388.htm
  • http://www.cits.net/china-travel-guide/Wutaishan/xiantong-temple.html
  • http://lamas-and-emperors.wikischolars.columbia.edu/Wutaishan+Pusading
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foguang_Temple
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanchan_Temple_(Wutai)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_White_Pagoda
  • http://sukhasights.blogspot.co.id/2013/01/the-symbol-of-wutaishan-white-relic.html
  • http://wikitravel.org/en/Wutaishan_National_Park
  • http://www.chinadiscovery.com/wutaishan-tours/activities.html
  • http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/china/wutai/bs01.html

 
For more interesting information:

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Please support us so that we can continue to bring you more Dharma:

If you are in the United States, please note that your offerings and contributions are tax deductible. ~ the tsemrinpoche.com blog team

26 Responses to Mount Wutai – The Earthly Abode of Lord Manjushri

DISCLAIMER IN RELATION TO COMMENTS OR POSTS GIVEN BY THIRD PARTIES BELOW

Kindly note that the comments or posts given by third parties in the comment section below do not represent the views of the owner and/or host of this Blog, save for responses specifically given by the owner and/or host. All other comments or posts or any other opinions, discussions or views given below under the comment section do not represent our views and should not be regarded as such. We reserve the right to remove any comments/views which we may find offensive but due to the volume of such comments, the non removal and/or non detection of any such comments/views does not mean that we condone the same.

We do hope that the participants of any comments, posts, opinions, discussions or views below will act responsibly and do not engage nor make any statements which are defamatory in nature or which may incite and contempt or ridicule of any party, individual or their beliefs or to contravene any laws.

  1. Pastor Adeline Woon on Sep 24, 2018 at 2:51 am

    Be blessed with these rare videos featuring explanation and advice about Dorje Shugden practice by His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche in his own voice. The teaching was requested by Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, one of the earliest masters who taught Tibetan Buddhism in the West.

    Video 1: H.H. Kyabje Zong Rinpoche Explains Dorje Shugden Initiation and Benefits (With English Subtitles)

    Kyabje Zong Rinpoche was an erudite scholar, ritual master and practitioner of the highest degree from Tibet. At the request of Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, one of the pioneers who taught Tibetan Buddhism in America, Kyabje Zong Rinpoche gives clear explanation and advice about the life-entrustment initiation of Dorje Shugden and how to go about the practice and get the maximum benefits in this video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzFMvlxAqtc&feature=youtu.be

    Video 2: H.H. Kyabje Zong Rinpoche speaks on the History and Lineage of Dorje Shugden (With English Subtitles)

    In this video, an erudite scholar, ritual master and practitioner of the highest degree from Tibet, Kyabje Zong Rinpoche talks about the incarnation lineage of Dorje Shugden and how the practice arose, with examples of Dorje Shugden’s previous lives that reveal his powerful spiritual attainments and contributions. This very rare teaching was given at the request of Kyabje Zong Rinpoche’s student, Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, one of the pioneers who taught Buddhism in the West to many disciples since the 1970s.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIzKSJgK618&feature=youtu.be

    For more information: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/great-lamas-masters/kyabje-zong-rinpoches-advice-on-dorje-shugdens-practice.html

  2. Joy Kam on Aug 13, 2018 at 12:53 am

    His Holiness the 10th Panchen Lama

    Tibetans commonly refer to His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama and His Holiness 10th Panchen Lama as the “sun and moon” of Tibetan Buddhism. They are the center of Tibetan Buddhist civilization, which draws to its sphere of influence millions of non-Tibetan practitioners. The Panchen Lama’s incarnation line began with the 16th abbot of Tashi Lhunpo Monastery, Lobsang Chokyi Gyeltsen (1570 – 1662). He was bestowed the title of Panchen Lama by His Holiness the 5th Dalai Lama after being declared as an emanation of Amitabha.

    After being given the title, his three previous incarnations were posthumously also bestowed the title, making Lobsang Chokyi Gyeltsen the 4th Panchen Lama. He became a teacher to many Tibetans, Bhutanese and Mongolian religious figures, including His Holiness the 4th and 5th Dalai Lamas, and the 1st Jetsun Dampa of Mongolia. A prolific author, Chokyi Gyeltsen is credited with over a hundred compositions, including a number of commentaries and ritual texts that remain central in the Gelukpa tradition today. Along with his role as a teacher of the Dharma, the Panchen Lamas are usually responsible for the recognition of the rebirths of the Dalai Lamas, and vice versa.

    The 10th Panchen Lama, Lobsang Trinley Lhundrub Chokyi Gyeltsen (19 February 1938 – 28 January 1989) continued both the spiritual and political roles of his predecessors. His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, his contemporary, was even heard to say and echo the Panchen Lama’s own words that the Dalai Lama would safeguard Tibet from the outside while the Panchen Lama would safeguard Tibet from the inside, as he never left Tibet after the political troubles of 1959. He was truly loved by the Tibetans, all the way until his passing. When he taught, thousands of people would attend, not only from his own Gelug lineage, but masters and practitioners from all traditions of Tibetan Buddhism.

    At his sprawling monastery of Tashi Lhunpo, he has a special chapel specifically dedicated to Dorje Shugden, where prayers and rituals are performed on a daily basis. In his great omniscience the Panchen Lama held Dorje Shugden as the principal Dharma protector of the monastery. He also personally propitiated Dorje Shugden among other Dharma protectors, and even wrote extensive prayers and rituals to Dorje Shugden. These rituals and prayers are contained within his ‘sung bum’ or collected works, which are provided here. As such a great lama, with an erudite and clear understanding of the Buddhist scriptures, a teacher to millions in both Tibet and China, from an established incarnation line and an emanation of the Buddha Amitabha, he could not be mistaken about his practice of Dorje Shugden.

    His Holiness 10th Panchen Lama is known for his composition of commentaries and practice texts that are still in use by contemporary Buddhist practitioners both in Tibet and across the world. One of these is a powerful ritual composition propitiating the compassionate Dorje Shugden.

    Upon the request by Acharya Lobsang Jangchub to compose a shorter version of the prayer (sadhana) for the exhortation of activities of Dorje Shugden, Panchen Lama immediately composed an abbreviate form of Dorje Shugden’s Kangsol. This text is entitled “Manjunatha’s (Tsongkapa) Lineage protector Dorje Shugden and five forms wrathful propitiations and confessional prayers and fulfilment of activities rites” or “Melodious sound of Accomplishment of the Four Activities” for short. Once the prayers were completed, he had signs and strong feelings that Dorje Shugden has been working hard to protect the Buddhadharma in general and the lineage of Lama Tsongkhapa specifically.

    Mirroring the abilities of one of his earlier incarnations, Khedrub Je, a disciple of Lama Tsongkhapa and master of both sutra and tantra, the Panchen Lama used his compositional skill and poetic prowess to create a masterful sadhana. Worthy of note is a praise in which the first letter of each verse is a Tibetan vowel. Such compositions are rarely seen, and have historically only been used when propitiating senior Dharma protectors such as Palden Lhamo and Kalarupa.

    The Panchen Lama also stated that while composing the Dorje Shugden sadhana (prayers) he was filled with a sense of happiness and bliss. He ends the composition with not only his official title but his ordination name, Tenzin Trinley Jigme Choje Wangchuk, endorsing the validity of his work. He composed the sadhana in his own Tashi Lhunpo monastery while in the Hall of Clear Light and Bliss.

    See the Panchen Lama’s writings and download: https://bit.ly/2KIfeXb

  3. Edward Ooi on Aug 10, 2018 at 6:23 am

    For the first time available, Dorje Shugden and his entourage of 32 asssistants of his mandala.

    Dorje Shugden is a powerful protector deity who is also an emanation of Manjushri, a wisdom bestowing Buddha. Therefore, he has great ability to help us to progress further on the spiritual path. He does this by helping us to overcome obstacles and problems for the modern individual.

    Due to his enlightened nature, Dorje Shugden is able to manifest 32 deities and within the same abode resides Setrap and Kache Marpo:-

    1. 5 Dorje Shugden families or emanations. They consists of the following:-

    – Dulzin Dorje Shugden, which performs activities to eliminate inner and outer obstacles.
    – Shize, which performs activities to pacify all illnesses and disease.
    – Gyenze, which performs activities to increase all desirable material and spiritual wealth.
    – Wangze, which performs activities to control difficult people and circumstances.
    – Trakze, which performs activities to wrathfully eliminate all insurmountable obstacles and life-threatening situations.

    2. 9 Mothers. They represent protection of the five senses and developing control of the four elements. These are all attributes that signify their ability to assist tantric practitioners with their higher meditations.

    3. 8 Guiding Monks. They represent the Eight Great Bodhisattvas (Avalokitesvara, Manjushri, Vajrapani, Samantabhadra, Maitreya, Kshitigarbha, Akashagarbha, Sarva-nivarana-viskambini) and they bring about the growth of the Dharma, through the Sangha, Dharma practitioners and Dharma establishments.

    4. 10 Youthful & Wrathful Attendants. They represent the ten wrathful attendants to avert inner and outer obstacles. They are beings who are from Mongolia, China, Kashmir, India, Bengali, etc.

    5. Setrap. He is a senior Dharma Protector from India and an emanation of Amitabha Buddha. He had enthroned Dorje Shugden as an authentic Dharma Protector. Therefore, he also resides within the same mandala of Dorje Shugden.

    6. Kache Marpo. He is not an emanation of Dorje Shugden but he is still an enlightened Dharma Protector in his own right. He was originally known as Tsiu Marpo of Samye Monastery. However, he has placed himself under the service of Dorje Shugden as his chief minister, performing many activities in order to protect and benefit practitioners. Therefore, he stands guard at the main entrance of Dorje Shugden’s mandala. He often takes trance of qualified mediums to speak.

    7. Namkar Barzin. He is the reincarnation of an old Mongolian monk and when he passed away in Phari area of Tibet, his spirit was placed as a powerful assistant of Dorje Shugden. He guards and protects buildings and great institutions especially those that benefit others. He rides on a mythical Gyaling animal that resembles a goat but with scales.

    These sacred images are available on *Vajrasecrets. They are made of high quality alloy and are one of a kind. They are based on the lineage of His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche’s monastery, Tashilhunpo in Shigatse, Tibet. In fact, the iconography of these statues are based on detailed photographs taken by H. E. Tsem Rinpoche during a trip to Tashilhunpo’s protector chapel. These are based exactly as the 10th Panchen Lama’s personal collection.

    Dorje Shugden mandala: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=131570

    Dorje Shugden’s benefit and practice: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=62422

    Dorje Shugden’s origins: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=106424

    Dorje Shugden chapel in His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche’s Tashilhunpo Monastery in Tibet: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=68698

    *Stand not included

    1

    2

    3

    4

    6

    7

    5

    8

  4. Pastor Adeline Woon on Jul 25, 2018 at 2:35 am

    Sakya tradition’s thangka of Dorje Shugden sitting on a throne within his palace with his four emanations and high Sakya Lamas nearby. Tsem Rinpoche

  5. Joy Kam on Jul 25, 2018 at 2:15 am

    Amazing post!!!!!

    Dear friends, For months we have been working on this BEAUTIFUL and meaningful mural in Kathmandu, Nepal. Please click here to enjoy the many stunning pictures of this mural: https://bit.ly/2LgOj8J

    Tsem Rinpoche

  6. Joy Kam on Jul 21, 2018 at 1:39 pm

    Antique Pelden Lhamo thangka with sacred Dorje Shugden at the bottom right. Can see Tsongkapa and Guru Rinpoche on the top also. Beautiful and holy.

  7. Anne Ong on Dec 24, 2017 at 8:39 pm

    Another interesting history and background on Mount Wu Tai ,the abode of Lord Manjushri the Wisdom Buddha. I love the interesting and informative write up and pictures. Thank you very much Rinpoche and blog team for this great article. 🙏😘

  8. Uncle Eddie on Dec 11, 2017 at 4:38 pm

    Wu Tai San is believed to be the earthly abode of Manjushri, the Buddha of Wisdom. Its a lovely place of visit for pilgrimage and for the holy engagement of prayers. It has been noted as the most prestigious and listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site! Mount Wu Tai is regarded as one of the four sacred mountains in China, where enlightened beings are known to reside! It is also not being known as “Wu Tai San” for nothing, as it is said to be Lord Manjushri’s favourite chosen earthly abode and closely associated with his beneficial wisdom of energy as said by many high Lama masters. Mount Wutai is believed to have been the chosen dwelling place of Lord Manjushri to help those who sincerely wish to obtain higher spiritual attainments , and is therefore, considered to be one of the most sacred Buddhist Pilgrimage Sites for Buddhists around the World! It is also said that, “it can leave a spiritual imprint or open up an existing positive imprint in the minds of visitors or pilgrims, which can spur them on their spiritual path”.

  9. Valentina Suhendra on Oct 25, 2017 at 9:26 pm

    Dear All

    I would like to share with you the sacred prayer of Manjushri – A Concert Names of Manjushri (’Jam-dpal mtshan-brjod, Skt. Mañjuśrī-namasamgiti), which consists of 160 verses and mantra sentences. One version is translated by Alexander Berzin, a scholar, translator, and teacher of Tibetan Buddhism, and the other one is from FPMT.

    Valentina

  10. Valentina Suhendra on Oct 22, 2017 at 8:36 pm

    Great message every Tibetan especially must read!

    99db7720-bb39-46d3-bd93-3e2ca0f6ed7c

    bb270277-6912-4e9e-ad1e-0da94bb74dba

    e60b9b05-2f2f-4133-940e-c7eb068a18f6

    e620014f-0cf8-44d2-945e-61f6141a58ee

    ef0d99f0-b31d-4337-aa46-066f75a4aa5c

  11. William Chua on Sep 11, 2017 at 7:06 pm

    Very informative and well written. It is definitely a great guide, to learn about the temples and history before going for this coming pilgrimage. The temples are built by Emperors who believe in Buddhism for their country to prosper. Also to note that Tibetan Buddhism plays an important role in Mount Wutai. Looking forward to pay homage to Manjushri at his holy abode.

  12. Lim Han Nee on Sep 2, 2017 at 6:08 pm

    Mount Wutai, famous Five Peaked Mountain and the abode on earth of Manjushri! Pilgrims flock to this sacred site where the wisdom energy of Manjushri abounds . Visiting this sacred place will likely leave a spiritual imprint or open up an existing positive imprint in the minds of visitors or pilgrims, which can help spur them on their spiritual path. There is so much beauty, peace and calm here.

    Many blessed and fascinating temples, monasteries and caves as well as other holy sites and features are to be found in these 5 peaks. Each peak is the abode of a form of Manjushri, which is housed in a temple on that peak. Wanghai Peak, for instance, has Wanghai Temple in which is the statue of the Four-armed Manjushri or Manjughosha Tiksna for pilgrims to pay homage and make aspirations to.

    Tourists and pilgrims will also be fascinated by the stories related to great historical figures and great Lamas who are emanations of Manjushri.King Trisong Detsen was believed to have been advised by Manjushri , on his visit to Mount Wutai, to establish Buddhism as the official religion of Tibet. Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyaltsen, a great and renowned pandit and Master,and who was recognised as an emanation of Manjushri, visited Mount Wutai and is strongly connected to it, playing an important role in the establishment of Mount Wutai as a centre of Buddhist practice.Emperor Kangxi of China made at least five pilgrimages to Mount Wutai to show his extraordinary devotion to and close relationship with Manjushri.

    All these emanations remind us that Manjushri’s presence is very strong in the five peaks of Mount Wutai.All these emanations , like Dorje Shugden, are unmistaken emanations of Manjushri.

    Vajrayogini’s presence is also remarkably strong. It is a must to visit the Fomu Cave, which inner cave is believed to be the manifestation of Vajrayogini’s womb!

    Indeed, wonderful Mount Wutai in China beckons to every Buddhist pilgrim, who surely cannot afford to miss it!

  13. Samfoonheei on Aug 11, 2017 at 12:35 pm

    I am getting excited counting my days to go on pilgrimage with Kecharian groups of Dharma sisters and brothers. Hear and read about this beautiful and famous place yet visiting for the first time.I ts a dream coming through for me as i could not believe that i am going as Wutaishan is the abode of Manjushri on earth. It was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2009.Thats fabulous been able to see for myself the beauty of it especially the Fomu Cave, Shuxiang temple, Manjushri Temple and so forth whereby we can do a short prayers there will be wonderful and its a once life time for me to pay homage.
    Read these article a few times to get famiiar with the information and very helpful for a first timer going there.
    Thank you Rinpoche and Valentina Suhendra for sharing these lovely post.

  14. MartinC on Feb 9, 2017 at 2:32 am

    Finally, logic prevails. People who can think beyond gross prejudice are beginning to see the goodness of Dorje Shugden. I came across this comment by Suzy on Rinpoche’s YouTube chanel (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vl-4lIwxph4&t=11s) and it is such a welcome change from the usual abuse hurled at Shugden people by those do not understand the issue.

    Suzy

  15. wan wai meng on Jan 21, 2017 at 3:06 am

    Thoroughly enjoyed reading the article and so see that the Chinese emperors saw their divine power was somehow linked to Manjushri. The closer the Emperors were closer to Manjushri then the more powerful they would be and the closeness gave an aura of legitimacy to their rule. Chinese people it could be said have so much affinity to Manjushri.

    There are also many tales in Wu tai Shan of people meeting Manjushri himself. Would love to delve more into that.

  16. paul yap on Jan 5, 2017 at 11:34 pm

    Im excited and fascinated reading all the stories where Manjushri emanated as an older person, pilgrims, monk etc giving advised to various people. As the abode of manjushri, Wu Tai Shan was a famous pilgrimage place, many politicians and Emperors has set foot on this mountain. Among them, Deng Xiaoping was one of the famous Chinese figure who went to Wu Tai Shan make prayers to Lord Manjushri. Wu Tai Shan is definitely one of my favourite pilgrimage site.

  17. Uncle Eddie on Dec 26, 2016 at 9:38 am

    Mount Wutai is located in Shanxi Province of Northeastern China. Mount Wutai, an earthly abode of Manjushri, was chosen by one of the most politically powered monks in Chinese History, Amoghavarja (705-774), as the site from which to pray for protection, and preservation of the nation. During Tang Dynasty, it became the sacred site, at which the Tang emperors received a spiritual mandate from Manjushri, as well as sacred messages from heaven, allowing the emperors to excercise their power on earth. Amoghavarja served three emperors, during the Tang Dynasty (i.e. emperor Xuang, emperor Suzong and Emperor Taizong). Tibetan rulers had shown great interst in Mount Wutai! It was officially announced that “Wutaisan” or the Five Peak Mountain has officially been listed as “Unesco World Heritage site in 2009”. Today, Mount Wutai seems a Pilgrimage Site not only for International visitors from different backgrounds, but also annually, for them to pray for the fulfilment to accumulate merits for themselves and their deceased loved-ones, and particularly for the purification of sins and recovery of any serious illnesses! May everyone has the good fortune to visit this Holy Mountain of Lord Manjushri one day! OM AH RA BA DZA NA DHIH.

  18. Jacinta Goh on Dec 16, 2016 at 2:14 pm

    Dear Rinpoche and Valentina,

    This is a very informative posts, ranging from its historic events, people, places and also suggestions for travelling packages. I am especially intrigued by the lamas or leaders who chose to reincarnate back again and again for the sake of fulfilling greater goals to benefits beings that expand few lifetimes ahead. I mean… wow! ?..
    Please allow me to repeat this again: Just look at the immense works that these lamas/leaders have to accomplish, not only in one lifetimes but in a few lifetimes for the sake of other beings.

    For most of us, we will try to gather any resources as much as possible in this lifetime; mostly for the benefits of oneself or our loved ones.

    That’s really food for thought.
    Thank you Rinpoche and Valentina for this great post.

  19. May Ong on Dec 12, 2016 at 11:24 pm

    This article was well researched and I love the historical links between Pabongkha Rinpoche (aka Changkya Hutuktu Rolpai Dorje) lineage linking to the Emperors of China then and perhaps even in future. I do wish for many aspiring Buddhists to make a pilgrimage there as Wutaishan is the abode of Manjushri on earth. Like to share the map of all temples located on the five flat peaks below.

    Wutaishan Map

    Wutaishan Map names location

  20. Samfoonheei on Dec 8, 2016 at 11:18 am

    Wonderful and interesting post.Its good to know more about Mount Wutai.The history, Tibetan influence and so forth really interesting to read….i do enjoyed reading and learned more.
    Mount Wutai is considered to be one of the most sacred Buddhist pilgrimage sites for Buddhists around the world.Its now a tourist attraction and listed as UNESCO World Heritage site.
    Thank you Valentina for sharing this lovely post.

  21. Fong on Dec 7, 2016 at 5:52 pm

    Wonderfully informative and detailed sharing. The tracing of the relationship between China and Tibet where Manjushri is concerned was a real eye-opener for me.

    Tying up the various interaction of the many emanations of Manjushri and the Emperors and monks in China over the centuries gave a clearer picture. The Tibetan influence starting from the 1st century right through the time of King Trison Detsen and Emperor Kangxi with Changkya Hutuktu Rolpai Dorje is strong in Mount Wutai. The many historical background supporting the claim that Mount Wutai is the earthly abode of Manjushri is really fascinating.

    Even the information for travel to Wutaishan is great as it gives an idea of what is available and inspire us to make the pilgrimage there.

    Thank you, Rinpoche for making this blog available for our learning and thank you to Valentina too, for another great sharing.

  22. Choong on Dec 6, 2016 at 10:42 pm

    Thank you Valentina for this neatly packed and information rich writeup.

    It weaves the long relationship between the peoples and leaders of China have with Manjushri very well, and this stretches back to even before King Songtsen Gampo brought Buddhism to Tibet. It was during the time of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386 – 535 CE), that Mount Wutai was recognised as the earthly abode of Manjushri.

    As a student in the Gelug or Ganden tradition, I’m also alert of the fact that there was a strong and spiritual relationship between the Changkyas and the Qing Dynasty Emperors such as the case of Emperor Kangxi who rescued the young Changkya Rolpai Dorje from battles occuring in Tibet, to educate him in China alongside with his grandson who would become Emperor Qianlong.

    It is a well known fact that Pabongka Rinpoche is a Changkya incarnation and “The” Lama to Gelug Lamas of the last century. It is no wonder that after Mao and Deng, the cult of Manjushri is very much alive in the vast China.

    • Valentina Suhendra on Dec 11, 2016 at 10:12 pm

      Dear Choong

      Thank you for your kind comment. Yes I do agree with you that it is interesting that the Changkya, who was known as Pabongkha Rinpoche’s previous incarnation enjoyed a close relationship with the Qing royalty.

      But that is not the only thing that interested me, many of the Dorje Shugden incarnation like Kangxi Emperor, Sakya Pandita and Buton Rinchen Drub were involved in the history of Mount Wutai. I think this is one of the indication that They were the emanation of Manjushri himself.

      Valentina

  23. Bradley Kassian on Dec 6, 2016 at 9:27 am

    Thank you Valentina for writing about Mt WuTai. Such a holy place to visit. So many temples there, and the earthly abode of Manjushri. Any one that visits there is truly blessed.

  24. Pastor David Lai on Dec 5, 2016 at 1:31 am

    This is a very nice and complete background on Wu Tai Shan. Thank you Valentina for this wonderful article. I do believe reading from a source that said that Wu Tai Shan is the Bodhimanda of Manjushri or the place where he achieved enlightenment a long time ago and gathered his disciples here to teach. He has since emanated back as a high-level bodhisattva in order to be continue benefitting many beings.

    I had always loved Manjushri and I can see that there are many practitioners do too. Perhaps, it is with the hopes of gaining insight into the Buddha’s teachings that they seek refuge in Manjushri’s divine blessings. Manjushri in China as well as Tibet, plays an important role in worship in order to aid the study, comprehension and realization of the teachings. After all, it takes special combination of intellect and merit in order to practice the Buddha’s teachings successfully. I do hope to have the merits to trek up these mountains one day and perhaps be lucky enough to be visited by Manjushri and personally bless by him.

  25. Lum Kok Luen on Dec 4, 2016 at 1:01 pm

    Dear Valentina,

    This well researched and beautiful writing on Wutai Shan is very inspiring. It can inspire one to make commitments to make a pilgrimage there to visit the place and make offerings with sincere motivation.

    Thank you so much Valentina and especially to H.E. 25th Tsem Rinpoche for making this blog so beautiful for all of us to obtain more information on our Dharma journey.

    Thank you.

    Humbly yours,
    Lum Kok Luen

Leave a Reply

Maximum file size: 15MB each
Allowed file types: jpg, jpeg, gif, png

 

Maximum file size: 50MB
Allowed file type: mp4
Maximum file size: 15MB each
Allowed file types: pdf, docx

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Blog Chat

BLOG CHAT

Dear blog friends,

I’ve created this section for all of you to share your opinions, thoughts and feelings about whatever interests you.

Everyone has a different perspective, so this section is for you.

Tsem Rinpoche


SCHEDULED CHAT SESSIONS / 中文聊天室时间表

THURSDAY
10 - 11PM (GMT +8)
5 - 6AM (PST)
星期五
9 - 10PM (GMT +8)
4 - 5AM (PST)
(除了每个月的第一个星期五)
SATURDAY
11AM - 12PM (GMT +8)
FRIDAY 7 - 8PM (PST)
SUNDAY
9:30 - 10PM (GMT +8)
4:30 - 5AM (PST)

UPCOMING TOPICS FOR NOV / 十一月份讨论主题

Please come and join in the chat for a fun time and support. See you all there.


Blog Chat Etiquette

These are some simple guidelines to make the blog chat room a positive, enjoyable and enlightening experience for everyone. Please note that as this is a chat room, we chat! Do not flood the chat room, or post without interacting with others.

EXPAND
Be friendly

Remember that these are real people you are chatting with. They may have different opinions to you and come from different cultures. Treat them as you would face to face, and respect their opinions, and they will treat you the same.

Be Patient

Give the room a chance to answer you. Patience is a virtue. And if after awhile, people don't respond, perhaps they don't know the answer or they did not see your question. Do ask again or address someone directly. Do not be offended if people do not or are unable to respond to you.

Be Relevant

This is the blog of H.E. Tsem Rinpoche. Please respect this space. We request that all participants here are respectful of H.E. Tsem Rinpoche and his organisation, Kechara.

Be polite

Avoid the use of language or attitudes which may be offensive to others. If someone is disrespectful to you, ignore them instead of arguing with them.

Please be advised that anyone who contravenes these guidelines may be banned from the chatroom. Banning is at the complete discretion of the administrator of this blog. Should anyone wish to make an appeal or complaint about the behaviour of someone in the chatroom, please copy paste the relevant chat in an email to us at care@kechara.com and state the date and time of the respective conversation.

Please let this be a conducive space for discussions, both light and profound.

KECHARA FOREST RETREAT PROGRESS UPDATES

Here is the latest news and pictorial updates, as it happens, of our upcoming forest retreat project.

The Kechara Forest Retreat is a unique holistic retreat centre focused on the total wellness of body, mind and spirit. This is a place where families and individuals will find peace, nourishment and inspiration in a natural forest environment. At Kechara Forest Retreat, we are committed to give back to society through instilling the next generation with universal positive values such as kindness and compassion.

For more information, please read here (english), here (chinese), or the official site: retreat.kechara.com.

Noticeboard

Name: Email:
For:  
Mail will not be published
  • Yee Yin
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 06:12 PM
    Mount Wu Tai is the sacred abode of Buddha Manjushri. Many people and great Buddhist masters will make pilgrimage trips to Mount Wu Tai to collect merits and to connect with Buddha Manjushri. If we have the opportunity, we should make at least one pilgrimage trip to Mount Wu Tai.

    Read this article to find out what to visit when you are in Mount Wu Tai:
    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/wonderful-wu-tai-shan-manjushri-holy-place.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 05:59 PM
    Dorje Shugden has 5 emanations, each emanation has different functions to address different problems. Shize is the pacify form of Dorje Shugden, he looks very peaceful and he rides on an elephant. His practice is for healing and longevity.

    Learn how to engage his practice:
    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/shize-a-practice-for-healing-and-long-life.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 05:50 PM
    Are you a lover of Indian vegetarian meals? If you are not, then you have to try these Indian food recipes. They are very flavourful and tasty, and best of all they are cruelty-free meals!

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/food-recipes/delicious-indian-food-recipes.html
    [no sender]
  • Samfoonheei
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 02:00 PM
    In many parts of the world , women do not enjoy equal opportunities to earn, participate in politics or get an education. They can face gender-based violence and discrimination. Women through history have not always had that choice. Now its natural to see female politicians, doctors, business leaders, and writers. Inspiring …… many courtesans who lived in ancient and medieval India were women who managed to make a mark in the male dominated society of those times. These courtesans were trained in many arts of poetry, music, dance and philosophy. They knew their talents, were confident of their abilities and choosing the path of philosophy along with their profession.
    In Buddhism there is no discrimination toward women , gender is just another label. Men and women are equal both in enlightenment and in practice. It has proven that many female Mahasiddhas and Yoginis have gained full enlightenment in a female body.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing….Truly agree that everyone deserves equal respect.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/courtesans-of-ancient-india.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 01:59 PM
    India has a long tradition of peace and amity. The reported remarks of the Dalai Lama, Tibetan spiritual leader, about the result of the recent elections in Bihar state has been misquoted by some. The results of the Bihar polls show that forces of tolerance are not only active but are in majority. Dalai Lama’s comments on intolerance should not be misinterpreted as criticism of the government. A majority of Hindus preferred harmony received the support of the Janata Dal while the Bharatiya Janata Party ( BJP ) played down the statement. Referring the Dalai Lama’s remarks as an attack on ‘extremist elements’, and the Tibetan spiritual leader has been in India for long and is aware of Indian culture. The BJP tried to maintain communal harmony in the state at all costs.
    As HH Dalai Lama is an icon of peace and harmony , should then look into the welfare of those Tibetans in exile, they have been sufferings, discriminated since the ban on Dorje Shugden over a period of time. May HH Dalai Lama please lift the ban for the sake of unity , peace and harmony .
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.


    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/india-downplays-dalai-lama-remarks-on-intolerance.html
  • Sofi
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 01:21 AM
    Talk on Reincarnation by H.H. Dalai Lama

    Hmm, tihs should be interesting since the Dalai Lama advocated DS practitioners will go to hell and the DS high Lamas just kept coming back in compassion which proves his theory wrong.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/talk-on-reincarnation-by-h-h-dalai-lama.html
  • Sofi
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 12:38 AM
    Making Water Offerings to the Buddhas

    Making water offerings to the Buddha generates great blessings and counters your miserliness. making water offerings is a direct method for creating wealth and purifying poverty. Easy to do yet offerings of water gives us tremendous benefits for our spiritual practice.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/making-water-offerings-to-the-buddhas.html
  • Sofi
    Saturday, Nov 17. 2018 12:25 AM
    The Buddha didn’t just believe in rebirth, he argued for it

    How interesting! Certainly warrant looking into further. How did Buddha argue and did he win the argument?

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/the-buddha-didnt-just-believe-in-rebirth-he-argued-for-it.html
  • Yee Yin
    Friday, Nov 16. 2018 05:56 PM
    Dorje Shugden has 5 different emanations. Each emanation has different functions to solve different problems. Trakze is the most wrathful of all 5 forms, he rides on a Garuda with a snake in his mouth. Trakze is very effective to dispel black magic or serious negative energy disturbances.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/trakze-to-dispel-black-magic-spirits.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Friday, Nov 16. 2018 05:53 PM
    Why not consider going on a vegetarian diet? It is scientifically proven that the vegetarian diet can improve our health. We will feel lighter as our body does not have to spend so much energy to digest the food. In addition, the risk of getting heart diseases and cancer is also reduced. Here are some very delicious vegetarian food recipes for you to try at home.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/animals-vegetarianism/dr-jiangs-delicious-healthy-recipesvideos.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Friday, Nov 16. 2018 05:49 PM
    What is your goal in your life? Getting a good job, earning good money, getting a big house, a big car and have a family? This is what most people pursue in their lives. But Nick Keomahavong has realised something higher, he realised that even if he has achieved all of the above, he is still not happy. However, he found his answer in spirituality. He decided to give up all the material things he has and became an ordained monk.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/inspiration-worthy-words/why-i-left-everything-to-become-a-buddhist-monk.html
    [no sender]
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Nov 16. 2018 11:10 AM
    Beautiful story of how Rinpoche got his first mala. Rinpoche just found one which came from nowhere on the road. As Rinpoche needed the mala for dharma practice at those difficult times in Howell, New Jersey and Rinpoche literally found one. Good things will come when we do good and have good thoughts.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/autobiography/the-mala.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Nov 16. 2018 11:09 AM
    Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. Buddhism was close to Einstein’s heart and part of him from the many quotes he wrote . ( Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future ) He did not consider himself a Buddhist but it appears from his actual writings that he did have a favourable view of the Buddha and Buddhism. Interesting post which I do enjoyed.
    Thank you Rinpoche.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/science-mysteries/einstein-on-buddhism.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Nov 15. 2018 12:40 PM
    Its great sharing …… Rinpoche’s biography “The Promise” in Mongolian for those Mongolian friends .May more and more people do read it to understand better about Rinpoche and the Dorje Shugden controversy. May Rinpoche’s teachings spread to every corners of the world. Thank you Rinpoche and writers team for this wonderful sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/me/%D1%82%D0%BE%D0%B2%D1%87-%D0%BD%D0%B0%D0%BC%D1%82%D0%B0%D1%80-tsem-rinpoches-short-biography-in-mongolian.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Nov 15. 2018 12:39 PM
    Interesting biography of a great and influential Gelug religious lady……the Lady Lhalu Lhacham Yangdzom Tsering, who was one of the most popular and also an important aristocratic students of Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche. She was one of the influential Gelug religious figures in the Lhasa at that time. The Lhacham’s devotion to the controversial protector deity Dorje Shugden whose practice she received from Kyabje Phabongkha Rinpoche is beautifully reflected in her deep spiritual conviction in the very deities and practices. Interesting read of a GREAT spiritual lady of how she struggles in life and never gave up her commitments to her guru Kyabje Pabongka Dorjechang. Her dertermination, motivation and inspiration are indeed incredible .
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing of Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche and his yogini student, the Lady Lhalu.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/great-lamas-masters/pabongka-rinpoche-and-his-yogini-student-the-lady-lhalu.html

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · »

Messages from Rinpoche

Scroll down within the box to view more messages from Rinpoche. Click on the images to enlarge. Click on 'older messages' to view archived messages. Use 'prev' and 'next' links to navigate between pages

Use this URL to link to this section directly: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/#messages-from-rinpoche

Previous Live Videos

MORE VIDEOS

Shugdenpas Speaking Up Across The Globe

From Europe Shugden Association:


MORE VIDEOS

From Tibetan Public Talk:


MORE VIDEOS

CREDITS

Concept: Tsem Rinpoche
Technical: Lew Kwan Leng, Justin Ripley, Yong Swee Keong
Design: Justin Ripley, Cynthia Lee
Content: Tsem Rinpoche, Justin Ripley, Pastor Shin Tan, Sarah Yap
Writer: Pastor Loh Seng Piow
Admin: Pastor Loh Seng Piow, Beng Kooi

I must thank my dharma blog team who are great assets to me, Kechara and growth of dharma in this wonderful region. I am honoured and thrilled to work with them. I really am. Maybe I don't say it enough to them, but I am saying it now. I APPRECIATE THESE GUYS VERY MUCH!

Tsem Rinpoche

Stay Updated

What Am I Writing Now

Facebook Fans Youtube Views Blog Views
Animal Care Fund
  Bigfoot, Yeti, Sasquatch

The Unknown

The Known and unknown are both feared,
Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
The unknown may be growth and opportunities,
One shall never know if one fears the unknown more than the known.
Who says the unknown would be worse than the known?
But then again, the unknown is sometimes worse than the known. In the end nothing is known unless we endeavour,
So go pursue all the way with the unknown,
because all unknown with familiarity becomes the known.
~Tsem Rinpoche

Photos On The Go

Click on the images to view the bigger version. And scroll down and click on "View All Photos" to view more images.
I was given this beautiful gift today from Karen Chong. It is an enormous gift. I really treasure this. I love anything to do with invoking Manjushri or connecting with Him. Thank you so much. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
I was given this beautiful gift today from Karen Chong. It is an enormous gift. I really treasure this. I love anything to do with invoking Manjushri or connecting with Him. Thank you so much. Tsem Rinpoche
I requesed His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche to write out the mantra of Vajra Yogini. He immediately compassionately obliged me. This is the mantra as written by His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche. I\'ve had this in a safe plastic wrap and wore it around my neck in a small yellow cloth \'bag\' for many years. Tsem Rinpoche
5 days ago
I requesed His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche to write out the mantra of Vajra Yogini. He immediately compassionately obliged me. This is the mantra as written by His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche. I've had this in a safe plastic wrap and wore it around my neck in a small yellow cloth 'bag' for many years. Tsem Rinpoche
If there were just 10 persons you should know about in your lifetime, one of them is this incredible Dr. Ambedkar. Enrich your life and don\'t miss this: https://bit.ly/2Dub7xu
1 week ago
If there were just 10 persons you should know about in your lifetime, one of them is this incredible Dr. Ambedkar. Enrich your life and don't miss this: https://bit.ly/2Dub7xu
Dear friends, watch this short 11mins video. It is so nice. My dream idea of living. I love the fresh things they grow for their own food. I wish our culture here was more geared toward this type of living. Watch plse. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=do1O5Avw_SQ&feature=share
1 week ago
Dear friends, watch this short 11mins video. It is so nice. My dream idea of living. I love the fresh things they grow for their own food. I wish our culture here was more geared toward this type of living. Watch plse. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=do1O5Avw_SQ&feature=share
No one stays around, do not depend on anyone. Let go of them before they let go of you...it is inevitable. Tsem Rinpoche
1 week ago
No one stays around, do not depend on anyone. Let go of them before they let go of you...it is inevitable. Tsem Rinpoche
Outdoor stunning Tara at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
2 weeks ago
Outdoor stunning Tara at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
The Promise - https://bit.ly/2NfHJjQ
2 weeks ago
Hunting is a horrible \'sport\' because it is not necessary and unfair. Killing animals is vicious and inhuman. Hurting animals does not help us, our karma, our mind and it does not help the animals. Killing animals serves no benefit and it stunts our spiritual growth. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
Hunting is a horrible 'sport' because it is not necessary and unfair. Killing animals is vicious and inhuman. Hurting animals does not help us, our karma, our mind and it does not help the animals. Killing animals serves no benefit and it stunts our spiritual growth. Tsem Rinpoche
This is a beautiful Yamantaka
3 weeks ago
This is a beautiful Yamantaka
This is so powerful. This is so true. This is something we must remember about our self worth. We must value ourselves without arrogance.
3 weeks ago
This is so powerful. This is so true. This is something we must remember about our self worth. We must value ourselves without arrogance.
Nothing is for free for sure.
3 weeks ago
Nothing is for free for sure.
Beautiful Dorje Yudroma protector. A gentle Goddess I\'ve had the pleasure to meet via her oracle.
3 weeks ago
Beautiful Dorje Yudroma protector. A gentle Goddess I've had the pleasure to meet via her oracle.
Beautiful Kalachakra painting
3 weeks ago
Beautiful Kalachakra painting
I like this picture of my teacher behind me.
3 weeks ago
I like this picture of my teacher behind me.
This magnificent Dorje Shugden statue is enshrined at Choijin Lama Museum in Ulaan Baatar, Mongolia. The museum was the home of the Choijin Lama, the State Oracle of Mongolia. Choijin Lama was an oracle of the Nechung deity and the brother of the 8th Bogd Khaan Jebzundamba (1869-1924), the de facto leader of Outer Mongolia. - https://palyulmedia.smugmug.com/Worldwide-Palyul/MongoliaConnections/Mongolia-Choijin-Lama-Museum/i-TQ8CmHM
3 weeks ago
This magnificent Dorje Shugden statue is enshrined at Choijin Lama Museum in Ulaan Baatar, Mongolia. The museum was the home of the Choijin Lama, the State Oracle of Mongolia. Choijin Lama was an oracle of the Nechung deity and the brother of the 8th Bogd Khaan Jebzundamba (1869-1924), the de facto leader of Outer Mongolia. - https://palyulmedia.smugmug.com/Worldwide-Palyul/MongoliaConnections/Mongolia-Choijin-Lama-Museum/i-TQ8CmHM
Please download this and share this meme with others. Thanks.
3 weeks ago
Please download this and share this meme with others. Thanks.
Beautiful Tibetan art for FREE download: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
3 weeks ago
Beautiful Tibetan art for FREE download: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU
Sacred Protector Dorje Shugden can help you, if you invoke Him sincerely..
4 weeks ago
Sacred Protector Dorje Shugden can help you, if you invoke Him sincerely..
Now there is a Tsem Rinpoche blog  site in Nepalese language! Check it out:  https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/l/np/
4 weeks ago
Now there is a Tsem Rinpoche blog site in Nepalese language! Check it out: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/l/np/
The Reasons Why People Who Practice Dorje Shugden Do Not Go To the Three Lower Realms- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSBbFiexCCE
1 month ago
The Reasons Why People Who Practice Dorje Shugden Do Not Go To the Three Lower Realms- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSBbFiexCCE
Very interesting blog post that goes along with this depiction of the Yeti. - https://bit.ly/2E43COF
1 month ago
Very interesting blog post that goes along with this depiction of the Yeti. - https://bit.ly/2E43COF
His Holiness Sharpa Choje Rinpoche Jetsun Lobsang Nyima of Gaden Shartse Monastery. He was a supreme master of both Sutra and Tantra. He served as abbot of both Gaden Shartse Monastery as well as Gyuto Tantric college. After serving as abbot of Gyuto Tantric college he entered into a few long term (3 year, 3 month and 3 day) Vajra Yogini retreats in the forest. He completed that long retreat twice and was going to enter it again till he was asked to be abbot of Gaden Shartse Monastery by H.H. the Dalai Lama. He was a great practitioner of Vajra Yogini\'s tantra as well as Dorje Shugden. He was a scholar of the highest renown and he was highly sought after for teachings. He was very devoted to Dorje Shugden throughout his whole life as a pure monk. I was fortunate enough to have him as one of my teachers. Humbly, Tsem Rinpoche

To read more- https://bit.ly/2zW2Grz
1 month ago
His Holiness Sharpa Choje Rinpoche Jetsun Lobsang Nyima of Gaden Shartse Monastery. He was a supreme master of both Sutra and Tantra. He served as abbot of both Gaden Shartse Monastery as well as Gyuto Tantric college. After serving as abbot of Gyuto Tantric college he entered into a few long term (3 year, 3 month and 3 day) Vajra Yogini retreats in the forest. He completed that long retreat twice and was going to enter it again till he was asked to be abbot of Gaden Shartse Monastery by H.H. the Dalai Lama. He was a great practitioner of Vajra Yogini's tantra as well as Dorje Shugden. He was a scholar of the highest renown and he was highly sought after for teachings. He was very devoted to Dorje Shugden throughout his whole life as a pure monk. I was fortunate enough to have him as one of my teachers. Humbly, Tsem Rinpoche To read more- https://bit.ly/2zW2Grz
Beautiful thangka painting of Lord Yamantaka the slayer of ignorance and who bestows supreme wisdom that eradicates all projections.
1 month ago
Beautiful thangka painting of Lord Yamantaka the slayer of ignorance and who bestows supreme wisdom that eradicates all projections.
Kadroma Metsik Nakmo or Dakini Ucchusma who purifies and heals the body.
1 month ago
Kadroma Metsik Nakmo or Dakini Ucchusma who purifies and heals the body.
I am reciting a daily prayer to Dorje Shugden. Here is the youtube link to the audio- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-OSudd323A
1 month ago
I am reciting a daily prayer to Dorje Shugden. Here is the youtube link to the audio- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-OSudd323A
It\'s hard to not fall in love with little cute Pema baby girl. She is so light, happy and wags her tail super fast when she sees us or anyone. Super friendly. She is a heart breaker for sure. Teehee...She is our Kechara Forest Retreat doggie and runs free throughout our sacred land. Her name Pema means lotus. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
It's hard to not fall in love with little cute Pema baby girl. She is so light, happy and wags her tail super fast when she sees us or anyone. Super friendly. She is a heart breaker for sure. Teehee...She is our Kechara Forest Retreat doggie and runs free throughout our sacred land. Her name Pema means lotus. Tsem Rinpoche
My Nepalese boys work hard and I appreciate them. Today we have purchased special foods for them to snack on and also to cook with so they won\'t be so homesick. These foods are all imported from their country. There\'s a street in downtown K.L. that sell all this. So happy to get this for them. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
My Nepalese boys work hard and I appreciate them. Today we have purchased special foods for them to snack on and also to cook with so they won't be so homesick. These foods are all imported from their country. There's a street in downtown K.L. that sell all this. So happy to get this for them. Tsem Rinpoche
I come out of the bathroom to be greeted by the mess the two monsters made...Some more they want snacks! Monster Oser girl and Monster Dharma boy.
2 months ago
I come out of the bathroom to be greeted by the mess the two monsters made...Some more they want snacks! Monster Oser girl and Monster Dharma boy.
This blog post has had amazing response. Since published on July 27, 2018, there has been 114,788 views and still increasing. I am happy to see how this post has made things clearer. Do visit this post here-  https://bit.ly/2MATbGe
2 months ago
This blog post has had amazing response. Since published on July 27, 2018, there has been 114,788 views and still increasing. I am happy to see how this post has made things clearer. Do visit this post here- https://bit.ly/2MATbGe
His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche with his disciple Kyabje Dagom Rinpoche. Beautiful picture.
2 months ago
His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche with his disciple Kyabje Dagom Rinpoche. Beautiful picture.
This monk takes trance of Dorje Shugden and he was happy to receive THE PROMISE book in Tibet
2 months ago
This monk takes trance of Dorje Shugden and he was happy to receive THE PROMISE book in Tibet
Find out about the blessed healing water for health and healing at Kechara Forest Retreat- https://bit.ly/2CtVQNk
2 months ago
Find out about the blessed healing water for health and healing at Kechara Forest Retreat- https://bit.ly/2CtVQNk
This is my ultimate home!!! Blue waters, trees, skies, mountains, house that is open, retreat, meditation, Buddha images and purple flowers. Wow. Such a perfect place for me. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
This is my ultimate home!!! Blue waters, trees, skies, mountains, house that is open, retreat, meditation, Buddha images and purple flowers. Wow. Such a perfect place for me. Tsem Rinpoche
To see other beautiful portrayals of Dorje Shugden, click here: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
2 months ago
To see other beautiful portrayals of Dorje Shugden, click here: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
Severed head Vajra Yogini has a brilliant orange body, orange darting eyes, wearing a necklace of freshly cut human heads firmly standing within a wisdom fire emanating from her sacred body reminding us to cut off our self damaging ego. Without the ego, our sufferings cannot survive and our happiness will arise. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
Severed head Vajra Yogini has a brilliant orange body, orange darting eyes, wearing a necklace of freshly cut human heads firmly standing within a wisdom fire emanating from her sacred body reminding us to cut off our self damaging ego. Without the ego, our sufferings cannot survive and our happiness will arise. Tsem Rinpoche
A thought on how to repay the kindness of the guru
2 months ago
A thought on how to repay the kindness of the guru
Very nice old artwork on the Bodha Stupa in Nepal.
2 months ago
Very nice old artwork on the Bodha Stupa in Nepal.
This is quite interesting....
2 months ago
This is quite interesting....
Wonderful statement by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Although Dorje Shugden is not negative, lets hope His Holiness can apply this to the Shugden issue. Then there will be peace.
2 months ago
Wonderful statement by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Although Dorje Shugden is not negative, lets hope His Holiness can apply this to the Shugden issue. Then there will be peace.
Left to right: Tritul Rinpoche, Gaden Tripa Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastic prayer hall during puja.
2 months ago
Left to right: Tritul Rinpoche, Gaden Tripa Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastic prayer hall during puja.
The oracle of Dorje Shugden Choyang Dulzin Kuten of Gaden making offerings to Kyabje Zemey Rinpoche during a teaching in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
2 months ago
The oracle of Dorje Shugden Choyang Dulzin Kuten of Gaden making offerings to Kyabje Zemey Rinpoche during a teaching in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
Their Holinesses Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Zong Rinpoche
2 months ago
Their Holinesses Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Zong Rinpoche
Please click on this picture and see how tragic this is.
2 months ago
Please click on this picture and see how tragic this is.
Advice by His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche- https://bit.ly/2NiryBg
2 months ago
Advice by His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche- https://bit.ly/2NiryBg
Zong Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche in 1987 Los Angeles.
2 months ago
Zong Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche in 1987 Los Angeles.
Beautiful Yamantaka print
2 months ago
Beautiful Yamantaka print
Beautiful and sacred Vajra Yogini painting for you to download free in high file to print out, frame and place on your shrine or share with friends. May you be blessed. Download here: 
 https://bit.ly/2N5zI02
3 months ago
Beautiful and sacred Vajra Yogini painting for you to download free in high file to print out, frame and place on your shrine or share with friends. May you be blessed. Download here: https://bit.ly/2N5zI02
The Fifth Dalai Lama & Dorje Shugden | ༧གོང་ས་ལྔ་པ་ཆེན་པོ་དང་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན། | 第五世达赖尊者与多杰雄登---read more--- https://bit.ly/2C65Iwr
3 months ago
The Fifth Dalai Lama & Dorje Shugden | ༧གོང་ས་ལྔ་པ་ཆེན་པོ་དང་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན། | 第五世达赖尊者与多杰雄登---read more--- https://bit.ly/2C65Iwr
Click on "View All Photos" above to view more images

Videos On The Go

Please click on the images to watch video
  • If there were more schools like this, then our kids would grow up with more caring awareness and kind emotions towards our environment and the people around them. They would grow up knowing that chasing materialism is not going to bring any happiness. I hope very much more schools like this would materialise. I hope in my future life I can attend a school like this. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 week ago
    If there were more schools like this, then our kids would grow up with more caring awareness and kind emotions towards our environment and the people around them. They would grow up knowing that chasing materialism is not going to bring any happiness. I hope very much more schools like this would materialise. I hope in my future life I can attend a school like this. Tsem Rinpoche
  • My Oser girl and Dharma boy in their cosy little bedroom next to me sleeping away. Cute.
    2 weeks ago
    My Oser girl and Dharma boy in their cosy little bedroom next to me sleeping away. Cute.
  • It is incredible how smart Oser girl is. She can steal the treat away from Dharma boy and so casually. Wow. She is so smart. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    It is incredible how smart Oser girl is. She can steal the treat away from Dharma boy and so casually. Wow. She is so smart. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Kechara Forest Retreat Dogs. Dharma boy is tiny and trying to scare off big boy Johnny. Johnny is so patient and just ignores Dharma. They are both cute and both live in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    Kechara Forest Retreat Dogs. Dharma boy is tiny and trying to scare off big boy Johnny. Johnny is so patient and just ignores Dharma. They are both cute and both live in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Tsem Rinpoche
  • BREAKING EYEWITNESS FOOTAGE: Workers violently punched, kicked, cussed out, & left sheep to die on dozens of Scottish farms 💔 Sheep bled after rough shearing & were stitched up without painkillers.–From Peta2
    3 weeks ago
    BREAKING EYEWITNESS FOOTAGE: Workers violently punched, kicked, cussed out, & left sheep to die on dozens of Scottish farms 💔 Sheep bled after rough shearing & were stitched up without painkillers.–From Peta2
  • Super cute seal and so gentle. Must watch this video and realize we are all one. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    Super cute seal and so gentle. Must watch this video and realize we are all one. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Legendary Heart sings “Stairway to Heaven” in tribute to Led Zeppelin. Incredible tribute and rendition. Everyone is blown away. TR
    4 weeks ago
    Legendary Heart sings “Stairway to Heaven” in tribute to Led Zeppelin. Incredible tribute and rendition. Everyone is blown away. TR
  • In a low-income neighbourhood, this man is growing his own organic produce, and giving extras away for free to neighbours who can’t afford fresh ingredients from the store. Must watch!
    1 month ago
    In a low-income neighbourhood, this man is growing his own organic produce, and giving extras away for free to neighbours who can’t afford fresh ingredients from the store. Must watch!
  • Neat little video
    1 month ago
    Neat little video
  • It is nice to see sangha release animals into the wild. Gen Kunchok Palden and Chodrak contributed to releasing of frogs back into the wild. This is wonderful. Compassion is the mainstay of all spirituality. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    It is nice to see sangha release animals into the wild. Gen Kunchok Palden and Chodrak contributed to releasing of frogs back into the wild. This is wonderful. Compassion is the mainstay of all spirituality. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This is a special ‘carpet’ for dogs that you hide their snacks and they have to go digging for it. It is challenging and fun where they use their nose, paws and all to dig and find the snacks in between. This dog play carpet is ordered online. You can see little Zopa baby who is a Kechara resident doggie looking for the snacks in this cute video. She is kept busy and entertained! Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    This is a special ‘carpet’ for dogs that you hide their snacks and they have to go digging for it. It is challenging and fun where they use their nose, paws and all to dig and find the snacks in between. This dog play carpet is ordered online. You can see little Zopa baby who is a Kechara resident doggie looking for the snacks in this cute video. She is kept busy and entertained! Tsem Rinpoche
  • Kechara Forest Retreat in Bentong, Malaysia’s dog Pema is super adorable and cute. Everyone loves her. She is wearing a Manjushri blessing pendant.
    2 months ago
    Kechara Forest Retreat in Bentong, Malaysia’s dog Pema is super adorable and cute. Everyone loves her. She is wearing a Manjushri blessing pendant.
  • Spontaneous trance in Tibet by powerful healing Protector Dorje Shugden of a monk who usually takes trance.
    2 months ago
    Spontaneous trance in Tibet by powerful healing Protector Dorje Shugden of a monk who usually takes trance.
  • 喀切玛波向詹杜固仁波切献供养
    2 months ago
    喀切玛波向詹杜固仁波切献供养
    喀切玛波护法降神,向詹杜固仁波切献供曼扎及身语意之供养,同时也加持马来西亚克切拉禅修林道场。喀切玛波护法乃古时候的紫玛护法,他是藏地首座佛教寺院桑耶寺的护法神
  • Huge Chenresig statue being built. Very beautiful.
    2 months ago
    Huge Chenresig statue being built. Very beautiful.
  • Sacred Kache Marpo in trance of oracle makes offerings to Tsem Rinpoche and blesses the temple in Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia. Kache Marpo in ancient times was known as Tsiu Marpo the great protector of Samye Monastery which is the first monastery of Tibet.
    2 months ago
    Sacred Kache Marpo in trance of oracle makes offerings to Tsem Rinpoche and blesses the temple in Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia. Kache Marpo in ancient times was known as Tsiu Marpo the great protector of Samye Monastery which is the first monastery of Tibet.
  • Shugden practice in Tibet strong and growing
    3 months ago
    Shugden practice in Tibet strong and growing
  • It is Tsunmo Nunnery in Tibet. This nunnery all practise Dorje Shugden.
    3 months ago
    It is Tsunmo Nunnery in Tibet. This nunnery all practise Dorje Shugden.
  • Light offerings to the outdoor Buddha Tara shrine in Kechara Forest Retreat, Malaysia at night. Beautiful.
    3 months ago
    Light offerings to the outdoor Buddha Tara shrine in Kechara Forest Retreat, Malaysia at night. Beautiful.
  • Interesting new interview of Boy George where he mentions about his practicing Buddhism- See the clip I snagged for you above. It’s beautiful to see him chanting. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    Interesting new interview of Boy George where he mentions about his practicing Buddhism- See the clip I snagged for you above. It’s beautiful to see him chanting. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Dharma boy is always mooching for a free snack! As shown in the video, Dharma gave up real fast and is waiting anxiously for a free snack!
    4 months ago
    Dharma boy is always mooching for a free snack! As shown in the video, Dharma gave up real fast and is waiting anxiously for a free snack!
  • Oser girl is very determined to get the snacks out! Look at how her cute little hands hold onto the ball.
    4 months ago
    Oser girl is very determined to get the snacks out! Look at how her cute little hands hold onto the ball.
  • Yudroma takes trance at Gyuto
    4 months ago
    Yudroma takes trance at Gyuto
    In Dharamsala there is a famous oracle to the Goddess Yudroma. She is the protector of Gyuto Tantric Monastic College. Many monks consult her for guidance. Here she is attending a puja session at Gyuto Tantric Monastic College where she is pleased with the people helping the monastery and takes trance spontaneously to express this. Tsem Rinpoche
  • The Simpsons: Lisa becomes a Buddhist
    4 months ago
    The Simpsons: Lisa becomes a Buddhist
  • Considering getting a tattoo of a Buddha image? Watch this video.
    4 months ago
    Considering getting a tattoo of a Buddha image? Watch this video.
  • Tsem Rinpoche’s personal shrine. May everyone who view the shrine be blessed and have peace.
    4 months ago
    Tsem Rinpoche’s personal shrine. May everyone who view the shrine be blessed and have peace.
  • Very powerful and heartwarming short video about love. A must watch and a must share. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    Very powerful and heartwarming short video about love. A must watch and a must share. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Megnath is such a devotee of Bhagawan Dorje Shugden where he brought this protector to many people. Must watch this short video of him with the school kids. Lovely. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    Megnath is such a devotee of Bhagawan Dorje Shugden where he brought this protector to many people. Must watch this short video of him with the school kids. Lovely. Tsem Rinpoche
  • My super adorable Oser girl Schnauzer reaching for a carrot on a chair. Her face looks like a stuffed animal toy. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    My super adorable Oser girl Schnauzer reaching for a carrot on a chair. Her face looks like a stuffed animal toy. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This is the shrine next to my working table where I sit daily. Tsem Rinpoche
    4 months ago
    This is the shrine next to my working table where I sit daily. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    1 years ago
    This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    This video is thought-provoking and very interesting. Watch! Thanks so much to our friends at LIVEKINDLY.
  • Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
    1 years ago
    Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
  • BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
    1 years ago
    BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
    1 years ago
    Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
  • Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
    1 years ago
    Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
  • Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 years ago
    Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    1 years ago
    This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    she received “one last visit from an old friend” 💔💔
  • Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
    1 years ago
    Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
  • Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
    1 years ago
    Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
  • Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant  Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
    1 years ago
    Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
  • Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
    1 years ago
    Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
  • Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 years ago
    Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
  • What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    1 years ago
    What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    Sick animals are more profitable... farms calculate how close to death they can keep animals without killing them. That's the business model. How quickly they can be made to grow, how tightly they can be packed, how much or how little can they eat, how sick they can get without dying... We live in a world in which it's conventional to treat an animal like a block of wood. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer
  • This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
    1 years ago
    This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
  • SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    1 years ago
    SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    This happens daily in slaughterhouse so you can get your pork and Bak ku teh. Stop eating meat.

ASK A PASTOR


Ask the Pastors

A section for you to clarify your Dharma questions with Kechara’s esteemed pastors.

Just post your name and your question below and one of our pastors will provide you with an answer.

Scroll down and click on "View All Questions" to view archived questions.

View All Questions
Today's quota for questions has been filled. Please come back tomorrow to re-submit your question

CHAT PICTURES

Big thanks to the cheerful team from GBG Malaysia! With busy lives, it can be really hard to find time to volunteer. However, the benefits of volunteering are enormous to you, your family, and your community. The right match can help you to reduce stress, find friends, reach out to the community, learn new skills, and even advance your career. Giving to others can also help protect your mental and physical health. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
32 minutes ago
Big thanks to the cheerful team from GBG Malaysia! With busy lives, it can be really hard to find time to volunteer. However, the benefits of volunteering are enormous to you, your family, and your community. The right match can help you to reduce stress, find friends, reach out to the community, learn new skills, and even advance your career. Giving to others can also help protect your mental and physical health. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Surplus food were distributed to 30 needy families staying around Jalan Sungai. Thank you to all volunteers ! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 hours ago
Surplus food were distributed to 30 needy families staying around Jalan Sungai. Thank you to all volunteers ! - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
yesterday
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
yesterday
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
yesterday
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
yesterday
Are you Ready??? Stay tuned on "KSDS Graduation Day" 18/11/18 9am At Kechara House. KSDS Together We Care. By Asyley Chia KSDS
2 days ago
4 days ago
KSDS - Pilgrimage cum Camp 2018 We will be organising KSDS very first family pilgrimage cum camp this 24th and ‪25th November‬ 2018 (Saturday and Sunday). Don’t miss this opportunity to have a Family Getaway in the holy place of Kechara Forest Retreat.by Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
KSDS - Pilgrimage cum Camp 2018 We will be organising KSDS very first family pilgrimage cum camp this 24th and ‪25th November‬ 2018 (Saturday and Sunday). Don’t miss this opportunity to have a Family Getaway in the holy place of Kechara Forest Retreat.by Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
5 days ago
What's so happening at Kechara House? Rehearsal for Graduation Day on this coming Sunday 18/11/18. Stay tuned.KSDS Together We Care.By Asyley Chia KSDS
The Promise
  These books will change your life
  Tsem Rinpoche's Long Life Prayer by H.H. Trijang Choktrul Rinpoche
  Support Blog Team
Lamps For Life
  Robe Offerings
  Vajrayogini Stupa Fund
  White Tara Mantra Bank Project
  Rinpoche's Medical Fund
  Dana Offerings
  Soup Kitchen Project
 
Zong Rinpoche

Recent Comments

Archives

YOUR FEEDBACK

Live Visitors Counter
Page Views By Country
Malaysia 3,628,402
United States 2,638,075
India 1,142,703
Singapore 635,155
Nepal 576,139
United Kingdom 507,846
Canada 458,079
Bhutan 456,360
Australia 403,249
Philippines 264,604
Indonesia 178,023
Germany 135,378
Mongolia 120,600
Portugal 119,114
France 104,907
Thailand 102,582
Brazil 95,402
Italy 92,779
Spain 88,913
Taiwan 83,765
Netherlands 83,378
Hong Kong 64,809
South Africa 64,444
Sri Lanka 63,011
New Zealand 62,835
Romania 61,984
Switzerland 58,114
Myanmar (Burma) 48,216
Mexico 46,583
United Arab Emirates 44,512
Vietnam 42,997
Japan 41,815
Russia 41,043
Egypt 40,521
Ireland 39,467
Cambodia 38,800
Sweden 36,895
Bangladesh 36,825
Greece 33,683
Total Pageviews: 13,670,087

Login

Dorje Shugden
Click to watch my talk about Dorje Shugden....