What you must know about China | 了解中国

Feb 10, 2016 | Views: 755

(译文请往下阅读)

Dear friends around the world,

I came across this by accident and decided to listen to Mr. Martin Jacques and I it opened my eyes to more understanding. Although he tells you mostly how Westerners see China, it applies to most of the non-Chinese world. I think it is worth our time to listen to his experiences, research and thoughts. It will bring more understanding in this complex subject. China without a doubt is becoming more powerful and a force to be reckoned with. We can either accept this fact and understand more or fight with this fact. I think understanding this phenomena will be much more useful. China is here to stay and will continue to exert powerful influences globally in many aspects as she has been a powerful world influence within human history. Better to understand and come to friendships with this powerful and ancient nation. There are changes within China as in every country we all like to see, but to effect changes is by first understanding their culture and respectfully approaching them from understanding. Approaching something via ignorance or hearsay will never bring desired results.

I highly recommend everyone to take some quality time and listen to his 20 minute video as he speaks very well, clearly and extremely articulate. I have the transcript in English and Chinese for your convenience.

Tsem Rinpoche

 

English Transcript

Martin Jacques – Understanding the rise of China

Or view the video on the server at:
https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/MartinJacques.mp4

The world is changing with really remarkable speed. If you look at the chart at the top here, you’ll see that in 2025, these Goldman Sachs projections suggest that the Chinese economy will be almost the same size as the American economy. And if you look at the chart for 2050, it’s projected that the Chinese economy will be twice the size of the American economy, and the Indian economy will be almost the same size as the American economy. And we should bear in mind here that these projections were drawn up before the Western financial crisis.

A couple of weeks ago, I was looking at the latest projection by BNP Paribas for when China will have a larger economy than the United States. Goldman Sachs projected 2027. The post-crisis projection is 2020. That’s just a decade away. China is going to change the world in two fundamental respects. First of all, it’s a huge developing country with a population of 1.3 billion people, which has been growing for over 30 years at around 10 percent a year.

And within a decade, it will have the largest economy in the world. Never before in the modern era has the largest economy in the world been that of a developing country, rather than a developed country. Secondly, for the first time in the modern era, the dominant country in the world — which I think is what China will become — will be not from the West and from very, very different civilizational roots.

Chinese explorer Zheng He’s ship compared to Christopher Columbus’s Santa Maria.

Now, I know it’s a widespread assumption in the West that as countries modernize, they also westernize. This is an illusion. It’s an assumption that modernity is a product simply of competition, markets and technology. It is not. It is also shaped equally by history and culture. China is not like the West, and it will not become like the West. It will remain in very fundamental respects very different. Now the big question here is obviously, how do we make sense of China? How do we try to understand what China is? And the problem we have in the West at the moment, by and large, is that the conventional approach is that we understand it really in Western terms, using Western ideas. We can’t. Now I want to offer you three building blocks for trying to understand what China is like, just as a beginning.

The first is this: that China is not really a nation-state. Okay, it’s called itself a nation-state for the last hundred years, but everyone who knows anything about China knows it’s a lot older than this. This was what China looked like with the victory of the Qin Dynasty in 221 B.C. at the end of the warring-state period — the birth of modern China. And you can see it against the boundaries of modern China. Or immediately afterward, the Han Dynasty, still 2,000 years ago. And you can see already it occupies most of what we now know as Eastern China, which is where the vast majority of Chinese lived then and live now.

Now what is extraordinary about this is, what gives China its sense of being China, what gives the Chinese the sense of what it is to be Chinese, comes not from the last hundred years, not from the nation-state period, which is what happened in the West, but from the period, if you like, of the civilization-state. I’m thinking here, for example, of customs like ancestral worship, of a very distinctive notion of the state, likewise, a very distinctive notion of the family, social relationships like guanxi, Confucian values and so on. These are all things that come from the period of the civilization-state. In other words, China, unlike the Western states and most countries in the world, is shaped by its sense of civilization, its existence as a civilization-state, rather than as a nation-state. And there’s one other thing to add to this, and that is this: Of course we know China’s big, huge, demographically and geographically, with a population of 1.3 billion people. What we often aren’t really aware of is the fact that China is extremely diverse and very pluralistic, and in many ways very decentralized. You can’t run a place on this scale simply from Beijing, even though we think this to be the case. It’s never been the case.

So this is China, a civilization-state, rather than a nation-state. And what does it mean? Well, I think it has all sorts of profound implications. I’ll give you two quick ones. The first is that the most important political value for the Chinese is unity, is the maintenance of Chinese civilization. You know, 2,000 years ago, Europe: breakdown — the fragmentation of the Holy Roman Empire. It divided, and it’s remained divided ever since. China, over the same time period, went in exactly the opposite direction, very painfully holding this huge civilization, civilization-state, together.

The second is maybe more prosaic, which is Hong Kong. Do you remember the handover of Hong Kong by Britain to China in 1997? You may remember what the Chinese constitutional proposition was. One country, two systems. And I’ll lay a wager that barely anyone in the West believed them. “Window dressing. When China gets its hands on Hong Kong, that won’t be the case.” Thirteen years on, the political and legal system in Hong Kong is as different now as it was in 1997. We were wrong. Why were we wrong? We were wrong because we thought, naturally enough, in nation-state ways. Think of German unification, 1990. What happened? Well, basically the East was swallowed by the West. One nation, one system. That is the nation-state mentality. But you can’t run a country like China, a civilization-state, on the basis of one civilization, one system. It doesn’t work. So actually the response of China to the question of Hong Kong — as it will be to the question of Taiwan — was a natural response: one civilization, many systems.

Let me offer you another building block to try and understand China — maybe not sort of a comfortable one. The Chinese have a very, very different conception of race to most other countries. Do you know, of the 1.3 billion Chinese, over 90 percent of them think they belong to the same race, the Han? Now, this is completely different from the world’s [other] most populous countries. India, the United States, Indonesia, Brazil — all of them are multiracial. The Chinese don’t feel like that. China is only multiracial really at the margins. So the question is, why? Well the reason, I think, essentially is, again, back to the civilization-state. A history of at least 2,000 years, a history of conquest, occupation, absorption, assimilation and so on, led to the process by which, over time, this notion of the Han emerged — of course, nurtured by a growing and very powerful sense of cultural identity.

Now the great advantage of this historical experience has been that, without the Han, China could never have held together. The Han identity has been the cement which has held this country together. The great disadvantage of it is that the Han have a very weak conception of cultural difference. They really believe in their own superiority, and they are disrespectful of those who are not. Hence their attitude, for example, to the Uyghurs and to the Tibetans.

Or let me give you my third building block, the Chinese state. Now the relationship between the state and society in China is very different from that in the West. Now we in the West overwhelmingly seem to think — in these days at least — that the authority and legitimacy of the state is a function of democracy. The problem with this proposition is that the Chinese state enjoys more legitimacy and more authority amongst the Chinese than is true with any Western state. And the reason for this is because — well, there are two reasons, I think. And it’s obviously got nothing to do with democracy, because in our terms the Chinese certainly don’t have a democracy. And the reason for this is, firstly, because the state in China is given a very special — it enjoys a very special significance as the representative, the embodiment and the guardian of Chinese civilization, of the civilization-state. This is as close as China gets to a kind of spiritual role.

And the second reason is because, whereas in Europe and North America, the state’s power is continuously challenged — I mean in the European tradition, historically against the church, against other sectors of the aristocracy, against merchants and so on — for 1,000 years, the power of the Chinese state has not been challenged. It’s had no serious rivals. So you can see that the way in which power has been constructed in China is very different from our experience in Western history. The result, by the way, is that the Chinese have a very different view of the state. Whereas we tend to view it as an intruder, a stranger, certainly an organ whose powers need to be limited or defined and constrained, the Chinese don’t see the state like that at all. The Chinese view the state as an intimate — not just as an intimate actually, as a member of the family — not just in fact as a member of the family, but as the head of the family, the patriarch of the family. This is the Chinese view of the state — very, very different to ours. It’s embedded in society in a different kind of way to what is the case in the West.

Did you know that amongst many other things like paper and gunpowder, the Chinese also invented golf?

And I would suggest to you that actually what we are dealing with here, in the Chinese context, is a new kind of paradigm, which is different from anything we’ve had to think about in the past. Know that China believes in the market and the state. I mean, Adam Smith, already writing in the late 18th century, said, “The Chinese market is larger and more developed and more sophisticated than anything in Europe.” And, apart from the Mao period, that has remained more or less the case ever since. But this is combined with an extremely strong and ubiquitous state. The state is everywhere in China. I mean, its leading firms — many of them are still publicly owned. Private firms, however large they are, like Lenovo, depend in many ways on state patronage. Targets for the economy and so on are set by the state. And the state, of course, its authority flows into lots of other areas — as we are familiar with — with something like the one-child policy.

Moreover, this is a very old state tradition, a very old tradition of statecraft. I mean, if you want an illustration of this, the Great Wall is one. But this is another, this is the Grand Canal, which was constructed in the first instance in the fifth century B.C. and was finally completed in the seventh century A.D. It went for 1,114 miles, linking Beijing with Hangzhou and Shanghai. So there’s a long history of extraordinary state infrastructural projects in China, which I suppose helps us to explain what we see today, which is something like the Three Gorges Dam and many other expressions of state competence within China. So there we have three building blocks for trying to understand the difference that is China — the civilization-state, the notion of race and the nature of the state and its relationship to society.

And yet we still insist, by and large, in thinking that we can understand China by simply drawing on Western experience, looking at it through Western eyes, using Western concepts. If you want to know why we unerringly seem to get China wrong — our predictions about what’s going to happen to China are incorrect — this is the reason. Unfortunately, I think, I have to say that I think attitude towards China is that of a kind of little Westerner mentality. It’s kind of arrogant. It’s arrogant in the sense that we think that we are best, and therefore we have the universal measure. And secondly, it’s ignorant. We refuse to really address the issue of difference. You know, there’s a very interesting passage in a book by Paul Cohen, the American historian. And Paul Cohen argues that the West thinks of itself as probably the most cosmopolitan of all cultures. But it’s not. In many ways, it’s the most parochial, because for 200 years, the West has been so dominant in the world that it’s not really needed to understand other cultures, other civilizations. Because, at the end of the day, it could, if necessary by force, get its own way. Whereas those cultures — virtually the rest of the world, in fact, which have been in a far weaker position, vis-a-vis the West — have been thereby forced to understand the West, because of the West’s presence in those societies. And therefore, they are, as a result, more cosmopolitan in many ways than the West.

I mean, take the question of East Asia. East Asia: Japan, Korea, China, etc. — a third of the world’s population lives there. Now the largest economic region in the world. And I’ll tell you now, that East Asianers, people from East Asia, are far more knowledgeable about the West than the West is about East Asia. Now this point is very germane, I’m afraid, to the present. Because what’s happening? Back to that chart at the beginning, the Goldman Sachs chart. What is happening is that, very rapidly in historical terms, the world is being driven and shaped, not by the old developed countries, but by the developing world. We’ve seen this in terms of the G20 usurping very rapidly the position of the G7, or the G8. And there are two consequences of this. First, the West is rapidly losing its influence in the world. There was a dramatic illustration of this actually a year ago — Copenhagen, climate change conference. Europe was not at the final negotiating table. When did that last happen? I would wager it was probably about 200 years ago. And that is what is going to happen in the future.

And the second implication is that the world will inevitably, as a consequence, become increasingly unfamiliar to us, because it’ll be shaped by cultures and experiences and histories that we are not really familiar with, or conversant with. And at last, I’m afraid — take Europe; America is slightly different — but Europeans by and large, I have to say, are ignorant, are unaware about the way the world is changing. Some people — I’ve got an English friend in China, and he said, “The continent is sleepwalking into oblivion.” Well, maybe that’s true, maybe that’s an exaggeration. But there’s another problem which goes along with this — that Europe is increasingly out of touch with the world — and that is a sort of loss of a sense of the future. I mean, Europe once, of course, once commanded the future in its confidence. Take the 19th century, for example. But this, alas, is no longer true.

If you want to feel the future, if you want to taste the future, try China — there’s old Confucius. This is a railway station the likes of which you’ve never seen before. It doesn’t even look like a railway station. This is the new Guangzhou railway station for the high-speed trains. China already has a bigger network than any other country in the world and will soon have more than all the rest of the world put together. Or take this: now this is an idea, but it’s an idea to be tried out shortly in a suburb of Beijing. Here you have a megabus, on the upper deck carries about 2,000 people. It travels on rails down a suburban road, and the cars travel underneath it. And it does speeds of up to about 100 miles an hour. Now this is the way things are going to move, because China has a very specific problem, which is different from Europe and different from the United States: China has huge numbers of people and no space. So this is a solution to a situation where China’s going to have many, many, many cities over 20 million people.

Okay, so how would I like to finish? Well, what should our attitude be towards this world that we see very rapidly developing before us? I think there will be good things about it and there will be bad things about it. But I want to argue, above all, a big-picture positive for this world. For 200 years, the world was essentially governed by a fragment of the human population. That’s what Europe and North America represented. The arrival of countries like China and India — between them 38 percent of the world’s population — and others like Indonesia and Brazil and so on, represent the most important single act of democratization in the last 200 years. Civilizations and cultures, which had been ignored, which had no voice, which were not listened to, which were not known about, will have a different sort of representation in this world. As humanists, we must welcome, surely, this transformation, and we will have to learn about these civilizations.

This big ship here was the one sailed in by Zheng He in the early 15th century on his great voyages around the South China Sea, the East China Sea and across the Indian Ocean to East Africa. The little boat in front of it was the one in which, 80 years later, Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic. Or, look carefully at this silk scroll made by Zhuzhou in 1368. I think they’re playing golf. Christ, the Chinese even invented golf.

Welcome to the future. Thank you.

[Source: https://www.ted.com/talks/martin_jacques_understanding_the_rise_of_china/transcript?language=en)

 

Part 2: Chinese Transcript >>

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中文文稿

马丁·雅克:了解中国的崛起(演讲稿)

或在我们的伺服器观赏视频:

https://video.tsemtulku.com/videos/MartinJacques.mp4

世界正以惊人的速度变化着。如果你们仔细观 察最上方的图表,就会发现,在2025年,这些高盛集团的预测报告,表明中国经济将会赶上美国经济。如果你观察下2050年的图表,它预测出,中国经济将会是美国经济的两倍,同时印度经济将会与美国经济并驾齐驱。至此我们应该清楚一点,这些预测报告绘制于西方金融危机发生之前。

几周前,我正在看由法国巴黎银行绘制的最近预测报告,是讨论中国何时能成为比美国更大的经济体。高盛集团预测是在2027年。而后危机报告预测显示出,是在2020年,距现在仅有十年时间。中国将从两个基本方面改变这个世界。第一方面,中国是一个国土辽阔的发展中国家,拥有十三亿人口,超过三十年来都在以每年约百分之十的速度增长。

在十年内,它将会成为世界上最大的经济体。在近现代从未出现过,发展中国家拥有比发达国家更庞大的经济规模这种情况。第二方面,在近现代第一次,世界上居主导地位的国家,以我之见会是中国,将不会来自西方世界,而是会来自一个非常不同的文化根源。

中国航海家郑和的船只相较于克里斯托弗·哥伦布的圣玛利亚号。

我知道在西方有一种普遍认同的观点,那就是各国在现代化的同时,也在不断西方化。事实并非如此。有这样一种观点,认为现代化是竞争、市场和科技 的一般产物。不仅仅是这样,它同样是由历史与文化塑造的。中国不像西方国家,它也不会发展如西方国家一样。它会在最基础的方面保持差异。很显然,现在的关键问题是,我们如何理解中国?我们应该怎样了解中国的实质?总体说来,如今西方国家的问题是,以传统方法理解中国。我们运用西方思维、西方观念来看待中国,这样是行不通的。现在我想给大家三个构成要素,以帮助了解中国的实质,以此作为开场。

第一个,中国并非真正意义上的民族国家。确实,过去几百年来,它称自己为民族国家。但对中国略有所知的人,都知道中国历史悠久。这是在公元前 221年,战国时期结束后,秦朝统一六国时的中国版图,标志着近代中国的诞生。你可以清楚地看到近代中国的边界。之后是汉朝,距今有2000年的历史。可以看到它已经占据如今的中国东部的大部分地区。而绝大多数中国人口,过去和现在,都居住在这片地区。

最值得称道的是中国的国家意识,以及中国人的公民意识,并非觉醒于最近几百年,并非如西方国家一样觉醒于民族国家时期,而是觉醒于,可以这么 说,文明国家时期。说到这里我想到,比如,祖先祭拜的习俗,独特的国家概念。同样地,独特的家庭概念,一些社会关系,如“关系学”,儒家价值观等等,这些思想和观念都源自于文明国家时期。换句话说,与西方国家及世界上大部分国家不同,中国不是一个民族国家,而是由其作为文明国家的文明意识所塑造的。在此之外还有一点,就是这个。当然我们知道,中国国土辽阔,人口密集,有十三亿人口。但我们经常忽略这样一个事实,中国是一个极其多样化、多元化,以及在很多方 面分散化的国家。你不可能仅以北京为中心管理这么大的区域,纵然我们认为情况就是如此。情况从来不是这样。

这就是中国,一个文明国家,而不是一个民族国家。这有何解呢?以我之见,有多方面深刻的含义。我举出其中两个。第一,中国人最重要的政治价值观是团结一致,是经久不衰的中华文明。2000年前,欧洲分崩离析,圣罗马帝国分裂解体。它分裂之后,再也没有统一。而处在同样时期的中国则截然不同,它艰难地维持着庞大的文明体系,以一个文明国家存在着。

第二点,可能更通俗易懂一些,是关于香港。你们是否还记得在1997年香港主权由英国移交给中国?你们也许记得,中国宪法的规定:一个国家,两种制度。我敢打赌,在西方世界,几乎没有人相信这点。“真是夸大其词,当中国行使对香港的主权时,情况就不会是这样了”。13年来,香港的政治制度和司法制度与1997年一样,和大陆实行不同制度。我们的想法错了。为什么会错?错在我们自然而然,以民族国家的眼光看待问题。想一想1990年德国的统一,结果怎样?基本上,西德吞并了东德。一个国家,一种制度,那才是民族国家的理念。但是治理像中国这样的,文明国家不能基于“一种文明,一种制度”的思想,那样是行不通的。事实上,中国针对香港问题的方针政策,也会用于台湾问题,是基于国情的,即“一种文明,多种制度”。

另一种用以理解中国的构成要素,也许不那么尽如人意。中国人的民族观念,与其他大多数国家都迥然不同。你是否知道,在十三亿中国人中,超过百分之九十的人认为他们共属同一民族– 汉族,这与世界上其他人口大国的观念截然不同。印度,美国,印度尼西亚,巴西,这些都是多民族国家,而中国人并非感觉如此,中国的多民族只位于边缘地区。问题就是,为何如此?我想,从根本上说,原因要归咎于文明国家这一事实。一段超过2000年的历史,一段包涵征服、占领、吞并、同化的历史,长久以来,造就了汉族思想的萌发。同时,这种思想由日益增长、强而有力的文化认同感滋养成长。

这段历史经验的最大优势是,如果没有汉族,中国可能永远不会统一,汉族是这个统一国家的坚固的基石。而其劣势在于,汉族的文化差异观念非常薄弱,他们笃信自身存在的优越性,同时蔑视非汉族人群,造成了他们对诸如维族和藏族的态度。

第三个构成要素是中国政府。中国的政府与社会的关系,同西方国家大不相同。我们西方国家的公民,会不由地认为,至少目前如此,政府的权力与合法性是民主制度一种表现。这种观点的问题在于,在中国公民的意识中,中国政府更具合法性,也更有权威, 相较于其他西方政府。这种情况的原因则在于,我想,有两方面原因。而且很明显,与民主制度无关。因为在我们看来,毫无疑问,中国不存在民主。而究其原因,其一,中国政府被赋予非常特殊的…或者说享有特殊的意义,其作为中华文化的、作为这个文明国家的代表和体现,以及守护者,中国成为一种近乎精神层面上的角色。其二,在欧洲和北美,政府权力持续不断地受到威胁。在欧洲历史中,政府曾与教会势力对抗,或与贵族阶级势力对抗,或与商会及其他势力对抗。而1000年来,中国政府的权威从未受到过威胁,它从没有敌对势力。由此可见,中国树立权威的方法,与从西方历史中得到的经验是大相径庭的。而结果就是,中国人以非常不同的观念看待政府。鉴于我们倾向于把政府看作不受欢迎者,或者不速之客,或者是一个需限制并制约其权力的国家机构。但中国人并不这样看待他们的政府,中国人把政府看作父母官,并不仅仅是父母官,而是家庭的一员;并不仅仅是家庭一员,而是一家之主,家中的长者。这就是中国人眼中的政府,与我们的观点非常不同。相比较西方的情况,这种观念以不同方式深入社会。

我想告诉大家,在此我们在中国当前环境下,所面对的问题实际上是一种新型的思维模式,与我们之前所认为的有所不同。中国注重市场与政府作用。亚当·斯密已在十八世纪末写道,“中国市场比欧洲任何市场都要更加广阔,更加发达,更加复杂。”除了毛泽东时期,大体上来讲,一直是这种情况。而这种市场是 与繁荣强大且无处不在的政府相辅相成的。在中国,政府的影响力遍布全国。它控制公司企业,大部分公司仍收归国有。而诸如联想的私营公司,无论规模大小,在 很多方面都依靠政府支持。经济目标和其他政策都由政府制定。同时,政府职权会渗入到各个方面,比如我们所熟知的计划生育政策。

你知道吗?在中国人的多项发明之中,除了纸张及火药以外,他们还发明了高尔夫球?

此外,这是政府的历史传统,是政府机构的一贯作风。如果你想找到例证,长城就是其中之一。这是另一个,这是京杭大运河。在公元前五世纪初具规模,在公元七世纪全面建成,总长1114英里(约1794公里),连接北京、杭州和上海。在中国,由政府建造的杰出的基础设施项目,可谓是历史悠久、这有助于解释我们今天所看到的,比如三峡大坝,以及其他中国国土范围内政府能力的充分表现。因此这三个构成要素,有助于理解中国的不同之处,包括其文明国家的实质,种族观念,以及政府性质和政府与社会的关系。总的来说,我们仍坚持己见,认为仅仅套用西方世界的经验,运用西方观点,采用西方思想,就能理解中国。 如果你想知道,为何我们对中国的看法大错特错,为何我们对中国未来的预测失误,以上就是答案。不幸的是,我不得不说,对中国的看法,带有那么点西方人的思想观念,就是有些妄自尊大,自负地认为我们是最好的,因此认为我们的思想政策全球通用。其次是无知,我们不肯应对关于差异的问题。一位美国历史学家保罗· 科恩的一本书中,有一段非常有趣的文字。保罗·科恩提出,西方世界自认为可能是各种文化中最国际化的一个,但事实并非如此。在很多方面,西方文化狭隘短浅,因为200年来西方国家统治世界,因此并不真正需要理解其他文化和其他文明国度。原因在于,到了最后它可能会,若有必要会动用武力摆平一切,达到目的。而其他的那些文化,事实上是世界的其他地区,它们与西方文化相比,远远处于弱势地位。但由于西方文化在其中的存在地位,它们被迫去了解西方世界。结果就是,它们在很多方面,比西方文化更加国际化。

以东亚为例,东亚包括日本、朝鲜、中国等等,拥有全世界三分之一的人口,现为世界上首屈一指的经济区。现在我要告诉你们,东亚人民对西方世界的熟知程度,要远远超过西方世界对东亚的了解。我想,这一点在目前是非常切合实际的。到底发生了什么?让我们回到开头的图表,高盛公司预测图。现在看来,从 历史角度来看,世界在快速发展和不断变化着,并非由老牌发达国家带动,而是由于发展中国家。我们通过二十国集团,很快取代七国集团或八国集团这一事实可见一斑。而这种情况导致两个结果。其一,西方世界对世界的影响力急速下降。一个突出的实例就是一年前,在哥本哈根举行的气候变化大会,欧洲各势力并未出现在最终谈判桌前。这种情形最后出现在何时?我敢打赌大约在200年前。而这种情况以后还会出现。

其二,这个世界对我们来说,将不可避免地变得越来越陌生。因为它将由我们所陌生的,所不熟知的文化、经验及历史塑造。到最后,以欧洲为例,因为美国还稍有不同。大体上来讲,欧洲人,我不得不说,对世界的变化一无所知,并且毫无察觉。某些人,如一个我在中国的英国朋友,他说,“欧洲大陆正逐渐被人遗忘却不自知”。也许他说的对,也许只是夸大其词。但同时还存在另一问题,欧洲正逐渐与世界脱轨。而这种情况的出现,则是由于对未来认识不清。当然,欧洲曾一度对掌控未来信心满满。以十九世纪为例,但情况不再是这样。

如果你想感受未来,如果你想体味未来,看看中国,那里有历史悠久的儒家思想。这应该是你们前所未见的火车站。看起来并不像火车站,这是新建的广 州高铁火车站。中国已拥有比其他任何国家都庞大的交通网络,不久之后将发展到比世界其他国家的总和还庞大。目前有这样一种想法,而这种想法将很快在北京的 一个郊区变成现实。这是中途巴士,在路面上能承载2000人。它沿着城郊道路在铁轨上行驶,而汽车则在它之下穿梭,其速度能达到100英里(约161公里)每时。这就是现实的发展趋势。因为中国的问题极其特殊,既异于欧洲,又异于美国。中国人多地少,因此这是对于,中国将会有许多城市人口突破200万这 一状况的解决方案。

那么,我该以什么作为结语?我们应该如何看待当前这个飞速发展的世界呢?我想这其中肯定有好坏利弊。但首要的,我想说的是,这个世界会朝着积极的方向发展。200年来,这个世界基本上是由一少部分人统治的,以欧洲与北美洲为代表。而诸如中国、印度等一些国家的诞生,这二者拥有全球38%的人口, 还有印度尼西亚、巴西等国家,它们代表了近200年来,民主化的进程中走出的举足轻重的一步。那些曾被忽略、曾没有发言权,未被注意、未被了解的文明与文化,将会在世界范围内展现其魅力。作为人道主义国家,我们必须对这种转变表示欢迎,我们也应该了解这些文明。较大的那艘船,是昔日郑和出航所使用的。在十五世纪初,郑和率领舰队经由中国南海、东海,穿过印度洋,到达东非。在它前面较小的那只船,是在郑和80年后,克里斯托弗·哥伦布横跨大西洋所使用的。仔细观察这张绢轴国画,在1368年由朱洲所画。我想他们在打高尔夫。老天呐,中国人居然还发明了高尔夫球。欢迎来到未来!谢谢各位。

 

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9 Responses to What you must know about China | 了解中国

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  1. Samfoonheei on Apr 11, 2018 at 12:01 pm

    It’s just a matter of time before China overtakes the U.S. as the world’s leading economy. China is set to dominate the global economy as it becomes the richest country in the world. Since opening the door to the outside world . China is increasingly playing an important and influential role in development and in the global economy. The Chinese economy experienced astonishing growth in the last few decades .
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing for us to know more of China as a powerful country

  2. Wai Meng Wan on Jul 14, 2016 at 12:36 am

    China, will ascend to the top in the world, economically and culturally. It is only a matter of time. China already looks for resources all over the globe and they tend not to meddle in other countries affairs especially in Africa, so that is quite a difference from US modus operandi and could be the defining factor in deciding which country will be the top nation in the world.

  3. Li Kheng on Feb 17, 2016 at 5:13 pm

    China was a great nation historically and attracted many people from various parts of the world to trade, visit and establish political relations. China fell with the opium was, which is said to be brought in by foreigners to “cripple” the people into addiction. Despite the poor conditions China had to ensure, she once again rises this century to be a world power. This talk was give in 2010 and today, 6 years later, what Martin Jacques shared has come true.

    We can only expect China’s influence to grow and spread as we witness political authorities make effort to be friends and avoid offending them.

    I admire what they have accomplished and agree with Rinpoche that we must be open to changes and adapt to them. As we learn, everything is impermanent 🙂

    • Stephen on Feb 17, 2016 at 11:46 pm

      **** Sam Crane debunks Martin Jacques’ claims of “CULTURAL EXCLUSIVISM” for China :

      “When Martin Jacques Fools the World”

      Couldn’t resist the title, which came to mind after I read this recent BBC commentary by Martin Jacques: “Is China more legitimate than the West?” (his book is entitled When China Rules the World) There are many problems with the piece, perhaps the least of which is its main thesis, but let’s start there.

      Jacques argues:

      “Now let me shock you: the Chinese state enjoys greater legitimacy than any Western state. How come?
      In China’s case the source of the state’s legitimacy lies entirely outside the history or experience of Western societies.”

      This was less shocking than simply inane. What does it mean to say that the PRC state is more legitimate than any in the “West”? He gives us no definition or basis for understanding what he means by “legitimacy.” Serious considerations of the topic, remind us that legitimacy is not simply popularity. And it’s obvious that Jacques has not really done any sort of systematic analysis to back up his claim. He’s just throwing rather empty rhetoric out there to demonstrate his admiration for the CCP.

      But he gets into some historical trouble with that second assertion, that China is somehow “outside the history or experience of Western societies.” This belies a certain inattentiveness to both Chinese politics, from at least 1911 onwards, as well as international relations more broadly. As Amitav Acharya , among others, argued years ago: “…China uses Westphalian language to stake its claims to territory and sovereignty.” Imperial China did not operate with the same understanding of sovereignty as the Western powers in the 19th century. This created big, big problems that weakened the Celestial Empire’s capacity to resist imperialist encroachments.

      Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Chinese states, both the Republic of China and the People’s Republic of China have not repeated that mistake. They have embraced the Westphalian notion of sovereignty as exclusive and extensive political dominion within a given territory, and they have used that concept to define and defend Chinese interests in terms very much within the experience of Western societies.

      And, yes, we all know that Westphalian sovereignty is regularly violated by the Great Powers that say they respect it. We all learned this in our international relations theory classes, of which, perhaps Jacques needs a bit more. The point is that the concept of sovereignty, as adapted from the Westphalian idea, matters because it defines a good part of the give and take, and hypocrisy, of contemporary international relations, China included.

      But there are bigger problems with Jacques’s piece. Take this assertion:

      “…China is not primarily a nation-state but a civilisation-state. For the Chinese, what matters is civilisation. For Westerners it is nation. The most important political value in China is the integrity and unity of the civilisation-state.”

      He’s taking an idea – China as “civilization state” – first forwarded by Lucien Pye twenty years ago and misapplying it by putting it in the service of a facile historical exceptionalism. Yes, Chinese history is different than American or British or French history. Yes, the idea and practice of “national identity” and “nationalism” arose in the West (theorists differ on where it started and when, but the modern concept is generally understood to have developed outside of China). But it is rather clear at this point that “nation” is very important to “the Chinese” (is there a singular, monolithic “Chinese” experience? I don’t think so…). Similar to the embrace of Western notions of sovereignty, many Chinese people, especially poltiical leaders and intellectuals, have worked hard, for over a hundred years, to define and reproduce various understandings of modern national identity in China.

      It is curious that Jacques discounts the importance of nationalism in China. I don’t know him, but his biography suggests that he was trained as an economist, with a focus on Marxist theory. And that might explain his disregard for nationalism. Remember: Benedict Anderson, in his classic study, works hard to convince those on the left that Marx was wrong in this regard, that nationalism is, in fact, a powerful political force, not just in Europe but all around the world.
      Jacques really misses the boat here. Of course, other aspects of his argument have some merit. China has gained a great deal of economic and political and military power in the past three decades. And the PRC is pressing against certain international rules and practices that its leaders feel do not serve its interests. But there is nothing particularly remarkable here. Other “Western” powers have behaved in similar ways. Moreover, it is not at all clear that China will “rule the world” any time soon. It will be more powerful. It will get its way in some areas where in the past it did not. But global power is diffuse. Capital in dynamically mobile. Advantages come and go, and that pattern seems to be accelerating as globalization makes everything – production, information, understanding – move faster and faster and faster.

      Assertions of cultural exceptionalism thus seem untenable in a world that fragments and shifts and chages so quickly. And nostalgia for a world that never existed is simply misplaced, as with this line from Jacques:

      “The Chinese idea of the state could hardly be more different [than that of the “West]
      They do not view it from a narrowly utilitarian standpoint, in terms of what it can deliver, let alone as the devil incarnate in the manner of the American Tea Party.

      They see the state as an intimate, or, to be more precise, as a member of the family – the head of the family, in fact. The Chinese regard the family as the template for the state. What’s more, they perceive the state not as external to themselves but as an extension or representation of themselves.”

      This strikes me as the fluffiest form of faux-Confucianism, uninformed by serious engagement with Chinese history or philosophy. Has he never read Mozi, the inspiration of an early Chinese utilitarianism? Is he familiar with Han Feizi, who rejects the government-as-family metaphor? Or the myriad ways in which family interests can clash with, and thus often take precedence over, state interests? How one could ignore the horrible assault on families and family institutions by a tyrannical state during the Great Leap Forward, and by omission assume that the memory of tens of millions of deaths is politically and culturally insignificant, is beyond me.
      So, to answer the question that Jacques poses, no, China is not more legitimate than the West. Not, at least, until the CCP allows for truth telling about the worst famine of the twentieth century.

      ( by SAM CRANE )

      LINK : http://uselesstree.typepad.com/useless_tree/2012/11/when-martin-jacques-fools-the-world.html

    • Stephen on Feb 17, 2016 at 11:48 pm

      “Why China Will Not Become The Dominant Power In Asia” (2014)

      by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

      http://www.regionalsecurity.org.au/Resources/Documents/SC10-3DibbLee.pdf

      *** YOUTUBE :

      *** “Why China Will Not Become the Dominant Power in Asia”

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AvNT3vyzr0

      Uploaded on March 26, 2015

      Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

      The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defence force for war with China, but it should be able to counter Chinese coercion and contribute to Allied military operations if necessary.

      CREDENTIALS :

      Paul Dibb is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre, Coral Bell schol of Asia-Pacific Affairs, ANU. He was head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1991 to 2004. Before that he held the positions of deputy secretary for Defence, director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation and head of the National Assessments Staff. He studied the former Soviet Union for over 20 years both as a senior intelligence officer and academic. He advised ASIO on certain Soviet activities. His book The Soviet Union–the Incomplete Superpower was published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies , London in 1986, reprinted 1987 and second edition 1988.

      John Lee is an Australian academic working on international economic and security affairs with a focus on the Asia-Pacific. Lee is an adjunct associate professor at the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, a Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney and a senior scholar at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. Lee is a board member of the Institute for Regional Security.

  4. Stephen on Feb 13, 2016 at 4:57 pm

    **** Sam Crane debunks Martin Jacques’ claims of “CULTURAL EXCLUSIVISM” for China :

    “When Martin Jacques Fools the World”

    Couldn’t resist the title, which came to mind after I read this recent BBC commentary by Martin Jacques: “Is China more legitimate than the West?” (his book is entitled When China Rules the World) There are many problems with the piece, perhaps the least of which is its main thesis, but let’s start there.

    Jacques argues:

    “Now let me shock you: the Chinese state enjoys greater legitimacy than any Western state. How come?
    In China’s case the source of the state’s legitimacy lies entirely outside the history or experience of Western societies.”

    This was less shocking than simply inane. What does it mean to say that the PRC state is more legitimate than any in the “West”? He gives us no definition or basis for understanding what he means by “legitimacy.” Serious considerations of the topic, remind us that legitimacy is not simply popularity. And it’s obvious that Jacques has not really done any sort of systematic analysis to back up his claim. He’s just throwing rather empty rhetoric out there to demonstrate his admiration for the CCP.

    But he gets into some historical trouble with that second assertion, that China is somehow “outside the history or experience of Western societies.” This belies a certain inattentiveness to both Chinese politics, from at least 1911 onwards, as well as international relations more broadly. As Amitav Acharya , among others, argued years ago: “…China uses Westphalian language to stake its claims to territory and sovereignty.” Imperial China did not operate with the same understanding of sovereignty as the Western powers in the 19th century. This created big, big problems that weakened the Celestial Empire’s capacity to resist imperialist encroachments.

    Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Chinese states, both the Republic of China and the People’s Republic of China have not repeated that mistake. They have embraced the Westphalian notion of sovereignty as exclusive and extensive political dominion within a given territory, and they have used that concept to define and defend Chinese interests in terms very much within the experience of Western societies.

    And, yes, we all know that Westphalian sovereignty is regularly violated by the Great Powers that say they respect it. We all learned this in our international relations theory classes, of which, perhaps Jacques needs a bit more. The point is that the concept of sovereignty, as adapted from the Westphalian idea, matters because it defines a good part of the give and take, and hypocrisy, of contemporary international relations, China included.

    But there are bigger problems with Jacques’s piece. Take this assertion:

    “…China is not primarily a nation-state but a civilisation-state. For the Chinese, what matters is civilisation. For Westerners it is nation. The most important political value in China is the integrity and unity of the civilisation-state.”

    He’s taking an idea – China as “civilization state” – first forwarded by Lucien Pye twenty years ago and misapplying it by putting it in the service of a facile historical exceptionalism. Yes, Chinese history is different than American or British or French history. Yes, the idea and practice of “national identity” and “nationalism” arose in the West (theorists differ on where it started and when, but the modern concept is generally understood to have developed outside of China). But it is rather clear at this point that “nation” is very important to “the Chinese” (is there a singular, monolithic “Chinese” experience? I don’t think so…). Similar to the embrace of Western notions of sovereignty, many Chinese people, especially poltiical leaders and intellectuals, have worked hard, for over a hundred years, to define and reproduce various understandings of modern national identity in China.

    It is curious that Jacques discounts the importance of nationalism in China. I don’t know him, but his biography suggests that he was trained as an economist, with a focus on Marxist theory. And that might explain his disregard for nationalism. Remember: Benedict Anderson, in his classic study, works hard to convince those on the left that Marx was wrong in this regard, that nationalism is, in fact, a powerful political force, not just in Europe but all around the world.
    Jacques really misses the boat here. Of course, other aspects of his argument have some merit. China has gained a great deal of economic and political and military power in the past three decades. And the PRC is pressing against certain international rules and practices that its leaders feel do not serve its interests. But there is nothing particularly remarkable here. Other “Western” powers have behaved in similar ways. Moreover, it is not at all clear that China will “rule the world” any time soon. It will be more powerful. It will get its way in some areas where in the past it did not. But global power is diffuse. Capital in dynamically mobile. Advantages come and go, and that pattern seems to be accelerating as globalization makes everything – production, information, understanding – move faster and faster and faster.

    Assertions of cultural exceptionalism thus seem untenable in a world that fragments and shifts and chages so quickly. And nostalgia for a world that never existed is simply misplaced, as with this line from Jacques:

    “The Chinese idea of the state could hardly be more different [than that of the “West]
    They do not view it from a narrowly utilitarian standpoint, in terms of what it can deliver, let alone as the devil incarnate in the manner of the American Tea Party.

    They see the state as an intimate, or, to be more precise, as a member of the family – the head of the family, in fact. The Chinese regard the family as the template for the state. What’s more, they perceive the state not as external to themselves but as an extension or representation of themselves.”

    This strikes me as the fluffiest form of faux-Confucianism, uninformed by serious engagement with Chinese history or philosophy. Has he never read Mozi, the inspiration of an early Chinese utilitarianism? Is he familiar with Han Feizi, who rejects the government-as-family metaphor? Or the myriad ways in which family interests can clash with, and thus often take precedence over, state interests? How one could ignore the horrible assault on families and family institutions by a tyrannical state during the Great Leap Forward, and by omission assume that the memory of tens of millions of deaths is politically and culturally insignificant, is beyond me.
    So, to answer the question that Jacques poses, no, China is not more legitimate than the West. Not, at least, until the CCP allows for truth telling about the worst famine of the twentieth century.

    ( by SAM CRANE )

    LINK : http://uselesstree.typepad.com/useless_tree/2012/11/when-martin-jacques-fools-the-world.html

  5. JP on Feb 12, 2016 at 11:35 pm

    Martin Jacques’ explanation on China’s psyche makes a lot of sense. Coming from Chinese descent and growing up with family of strong Chinese culture and mentality although I spent most of my teenage years in the US, I can relate to what Mr Jacques says. Even though my parents are 1st generation Chinese living in Malaysia, they are very pro China and very proud of being Han chinese. Thousands of years of Chinese culture and mentality seem to be in the bloodstream although they have never lived in China before. Imagine how strong Chinese ideology is with mainland Chinese.

    It’s true that Western ideology is very different from Chinese. It’s difficult to relate to Chinese mentality if we use Western mentality as a point of reference. So if we want to be part of the rise of China, which is inevitable, it makes sense to understand Chinese mentality.

  6. Stephen on Feb 12, 2016 at 7:30 pm

    “Why China Will Not Become The Dominant Power In Asia” (2014)

    by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

    http://www.regionalsecurity.org.au/Resources/Documents/SC10-3DibbLee.pdf

    *** YOUTUBE :

    *** “Why China Will Not Become the Dominant Power in Asia”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AvNT3vyzr0

    Uploaded on March 26, 2015

    Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

    The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defence force for war with China, but it should be able to counter Chinese coercion and contribute to Allied military operations if necessary.

    CREDENTIALS :

    Paul Dibb is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre, Coral Bell schol of Asia-Pacific Affairs, ANU. He was head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1991 to 2004. Before that he held the positions of deputy secretary for Defence, director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation and head of the National Assessments Staff. He studied the former Soviet Union for over 20 years both as a senior intelligence officer and academic. He advised ASIO on certain Soviet activities. His book The Soviet Union–the Incomplete Superpower was published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies , London in 1986, reprinted 1987 and second edition 1988.

    John Lee is an Australian academic working on international economic and security affairs with a focus on the Asia-Pacific. Lee is an adjunct associate professor at the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, a Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney and a senior scholar at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. Lee is a board member of the Institute for Regional Security.

  7. Pastor Elena Khong Jean Ai on Feb 12, 2016 at 9:30 am

    This is a blog post everyone needs to read if they want to understand more about the world’s most powerful nation. It is undeniable that China is on the rise and it has been so for the last decade. Where most economies have shrunk, China has only expanded and it doesn’t look to be changing any time soon. I mean, with their population alone, they have a sufficiently large enough market to keep all of their industries going without needing outside help.

    But what I appreciated most about this objective talk is Martin Jacques’ assertion that we need to stop looking at China through Western eyes and making predictions based on that. We cannot judge one nation of people on the values and principles of another nation; there is no shared history or shared culture to make this possible. China has always been historically Buddhist / Taoist / Confucianist for example so how can you judge their values based on Judeo-Christian / Abrahamic concepts?

    To do so and then question why China doesn’t live up to expectations is (as Martin Jacques said) arrogant. Yes, the Anglophile has said it! 🙂

    Setting aside our preconceived notions about China, and whatever we may like or dislike about them, understanding this rich, deep culture is important for anyone to have a successful relationship with them. When you go to a powerful person to ask for a favour, isn’t it logical to ask around and find out what they like and don’t like, so you know how to talk to them, what kind of gift to give them, what their favourite foods are, how you can woo them? Dealing with China is just like that and if we want to achieve our aims (whether it is political, financial or spiritual), then we had best swallow our pride, examine the evidence and the facts, and move on from there.

    What do we want, to do the necessary to achieve our aims and goals, or to sulk on the sidelines because we tried to make Goliath play our game and in the end, we didn’t get what we want?

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Blog Chat

BLOG CHAT

Dear blog friends,

I’ve created this section for all of you to share your opinions, thoughts and feelings about whatever interests you.

Everyone has a different perspective, so this section is for you.

Tsem Rinpoche


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UPCOMING TOPICS FOR DEC / 十二月份讨论主题

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Give the room a chance to answer you. Patience is a virtue. And if after awhile, people don't respond, perhaps they don't know the answer or they did not see your question. Do ask again or address someone directly. Do not be offended if people do not or are unable to respond to you.

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Please let this be a conducive space for discussions, both light and profound.

KECHARA FOREST RETREAT PROGRESS UPDATES

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The Kechara Forest Retreat is a unique holistic retreat centre focused on the total wellness of body, mind and spirit. This is a place where families and individuals will find peace, nourishment and inspiration in a natural forest environment. At Kechara Forest Retreat, we are committed to give back to society through instilling the next generation with universal positive values such as kindness and compassion.

For more information, please read here (english), here (chinese), or the official site: retreat.kechara.com.

Noticeboard

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  • Yee Yin
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 09:23 PM
    Wow, this young boy could paint like an experienced painter with a style that is so unique. He is very talented since young. But where does the talent come from? How come some people have a special talent since birth but some do not? For Buddhists, we believe that the talent is actually the imprint from the previous life. It is something that the person has done so much in their previous life that when they take rebirth in another body, they still have the tendency to do the same thing if the condition is right.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/science-mysteries/kid-painter-is-mini-monet.html
    [no sender]
  • Tsem Rinpoche
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 07:31 PM
    This special post “Kyabje Zong Rinpoche’s Advice on Dorje Shugden’s Practice” contains His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche’s actual speech and the accompanying English translation on the benefits of Dorje Shugden’s practice and lineage. Fantastic! We all know Kyabje Zong Rinpoche is the same nature as Heruka-Chakrasamvara. To hear his voice is a tremendous blessing as he was an erudite Pandit, master artist, supreme debater, historian, Mahasiddha and highly attained yogi. He was also extremely kind, loving, caring and he dedicated his whole life to teaching the Dharma to thousands. He was a beautiful human being. He was also my spiritual father and root guru.

    I came across his beautiful speech on the World Peace Protector Dorje Shugden and I have blogged his holy speech so that many around the world can listen to Kyabje Zong Rinpoche explain the benefits of this supreme protector. There can be no doubts after this.

    Who dare say that Kyabje Zong Rinpoche was wrong, errant, without knowledge or evil? No one can say this as it is untrue. So far this blog post has garnered over 134k (one hundred thirty-four thousand views)!! It has reached a vast amount of people so they can hear first hand from an enlightened lama how beneficial Dorje Shugden is!! Many wonderful people who seek knowledge and wisdom will benefit from this and I rejoice.

    In his love for me, over 30 years ago Kyabje Zong Rinpoche personally instructed me to practice Dorje Shugden and I know he would never give me anything that would harm me or anyone else. As such, I have great confidence and I share Dorje Shugden with thousands including family, close friends, benefactors and so many others who need help because I know he will benefit others as he did me. His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche was a Bodhisattva who lived his life only to benefit others. Whatever promises I have made to him, I will never abandon. I will forever bow to his holy feet.

    Humbly, Tsem Rinpoche

    Click here to see this beautiful post with many vintage photos- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=122352

    P.S. To this post I have recently added translations of these speeches into Japanese, Nepalese and Spanish.
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 12:44 PM
    Queen Genepil, the last queen of Mongolia and last wife of the last Mongol Khan. Interesting short biography of this Mongol queen. At age 33 in her 5 months pregnancy , she was executed with her father because of her involvement with the Japanese forces . Queen Genepil had in fact concealed many mystery and past secrets in the palace unknown to many. She looked pretty in the queen costumes with a beautiful head gear, just wondering if nowadays the Mongolian Queen wear this . We are considered fortunate able to see this rare costumes. Interesting history to read.
    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/last-queen-of-mongolia
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 12:43 PM
    Interesting news …… Oklahoma Supreme Court had decide to separate religion and politics. The history of the world, we can see clearly how the involvement of government in religious matters has caused great discrimination among the communities. An example in the Tibetan Leardership , because of the ban on Dorje Shugen practice it cause hardships, suffering ,discrimination, disharmony, and many more. For the past decades , many of the Tibetans in exiles had suffered badly. Where religion is concern ,politics should not comes in. Freedom of religion is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or community, and so forth without government influence and intervention. It also includes the freedom to change one’s religion or beliefs. No government should speak against another religion or any religion. Peace, harmony and happiness can only materialised with respect among and within all people. Everyone of us should be given the choice to what we want to pray.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/the-ten-commandments-monument.html
  • Sofi
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 08:38 AM
    Dorje Shugden Gyenze to Increase Life, Merits and Wealth

    In one of our private sessions, I asked Kensur Rinpoche, “If we fully rely on Dorje Shugden, and focus on Dorje Shugden, technically can we become fully enlightened?” And Kensur Rinpoche thought about it and he said, “Yes, we definitely can become fully enlightened because Dorje Shugden is a fully enlightened being.”

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/prayers-and-sadhanas/dorje-shugden-gyenze-to-increase-life-merits-and-wealth.html
  • Sofi
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 08:25 AM
    Bodhi Tree Vajra Yogini

    All of Rinpoche’s Buddha statues are beautiful and yet, what is so special about this particular Buddha Vajra Yogini? Did she perform some miracle? Well to me this beautiful Lady Vajra Yogini gave us the best miracle! Find out what and share with us your thoughts.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/me/bodhi-tree-vajra-yogini.html
  • Sofi
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 08:21 AM
    THIS IS ME IN HOLLYWOOD IN THE 80′S

    Rinpoche in his youth enjoying Hollywood, yet never giving up on any of his duties and practices. Read of Rinpoche’s survival after he left home to pursue his dream.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/me/this-is-me-in-hollywood-in-the-80s.html
  • Sofi
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 08:15 AM
    5-Foot Gyenze Statue Arrives in Kechara Forest Retreat

    With this in mind, His Eminence the 25th Tsem Rinpoche envisioned and built a chapel specifically dedicated to Gyenze and his beneficial energies. Located at the front of Kechara Forest Retreat, it has become a place of spiritual pilgrimage for many people of all backgrounds and Gyenze has manifested signs of fulfilling people’s wishes.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/kechara-13-depts/5foot-gyenze-statue-arrives-in-kechara-forest-retreat.html
  • Tsem Rinpoche
    Friday, Dec 14. 2018 12:56 AM
    Very inspirational movie on the race divide in the US-good story line, good acting & lessons to be learned- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-65f3ISewk


  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 09:47 PM
    Tsem Rinpoche has been very kind to commission many Dorje Shugden paintings for us to download for free. These Dorje Shugden images are depicted in different styles and cultures or painting techniques. Even though Dorje Shugden is depicted in different styles but the iconography is according to the scripture, which is the most important thing to consider.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/art-architecture/which-dorje-shugden-style-is-your-favourite.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 09:34 PM
    Do you know what is a self-arising Buddha? The Buddhist deity images appear on the wood or rock by itself without intervention from human beings. Sometimes Buddhas will show signs in this way to devotees who have very strong faith in them. This is to benefit sentient beings by becoming objects of worship and veneration through which we are able to connect with the enlightened beings, generate powerful aspirations, and accumulate tremendous amounts of merit.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/the-self-arising-chenrezig.html
    [no sender]
  • Yee Yin
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 08:49 PM
    Do you know the tradition of oracular trance has over 1000 years of history in Tibet? The tradition can be found in the Tibetan Buddhist monastery too. The person who takes trance is called the oracle and the oracle can take trance of local deities, wordly protectors, mountain gods, healing deities, spirit etc. Some are trained to take trance of enlightened Dharma Protectors, for example, Dorje Shugden.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/art-architecture/tibetans-welcome-mountain-spirits-in-faith-ceremony.html
    [no sender]
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 11:56 AM
    Wonderful …..we could practice Tantric practice without initiations. A useful guild line for us and its filled with blessing. With this practice we could make a stronger connection , collect merits, purify karma and create the causes to gain wisdom.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this teachings which will benefit all of us.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/practicing-tantric-buddhas-without-initiation-or-commitment
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 11:55 AM
    Beautiful magical paintings in Scandinavian style commissioned by Tsem Rinpoche of this Powerful Dharma Protector Dorje Shugden. It paints a thousand words ….. Wow …looks like in a fairy tale forest where all different dwarfs, little people, elves, trolls and other magnificent worldly beings paying homage to this Protector. Thank you Rinpoche for this sharing.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/the-emerald-forest
  • Samfoonheei
    Thursday, Dec 13. 2018 11:54 AM
    Beautiful account of Rinpoche’s meeting with Guru Deva Rinpoche that has changed his life. Life in Gaden Shartse Monastery is not a bed of roses, Rinpoche had little to eat an living next to a cow shed. Meeting and reunited with his father whom had later became one of Rinpoche first major sponsors. Guru Deva indeed played an important role in Rinpoche’s life. Guru Deva Rinpoche is considered by many in the Tibetan and Mongolian community to be the emanation of Gyenze. His great masters were none other than – Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche, Kyabje Yongzin Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Yongzin Ling Rinpoche. Following his teachers’ advice , Guru Deva had benefited countless sentient beings throughout his life . He had also been instrumental in the re-establishment of Lama Tsongkhapa’s lineage in India and towards the Buddhadharma in Mongolia, Tibet and even Taiwan. All because of Guru Deva Rinpoche ,we have Rinpoche here in Malaysia, as Guru Deva Rinpoche has contributed towards Rinpoche’s spiritual journey.
    Interesting read of Rinpoche biography and Rinpoche spiritual journey.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this beautiful sharing of a GREAT lama. Thanks to Martin Chow too.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/great-lamas-masters/my-recollection-of-h-e-guru-deva-rinpoche.html

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · »

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The Unknown

The Known and unknown are both feared,
Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
The unknown may be growth and opportunities,
One shall never know if one fears the unknown more than the known.
Who says the unknown would be worse than the known?
But then again, the unknown is sometimes worse than the known. In the end nothing is known unless we endeavour,
So go pursue all the way with the unknown,
because all unknown with familiarity becomes the known.
~Tsem Rinpoche

Photos On The Go

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Kechara Saraswati Arts (KSA) offers a comprehensive statue and tsa tsa painting service. We are able to paint both the face and body, using traditional Tibetan techniques and materials.

KSA can transform a ‘bare’ or ‘raw’ object of art into a living masterpiece through a variety of painting techniques. There are several ‘finishes’ to choose from. Be it an ‘antique’ look, a fully-painted colourful finish or a simple ‘gold dusted look’, your imagination and heart’s wishes are fulfilled through KSA’s mastery and artistry in action.

Our team have learnt the techniques of traditional statue painting from the finest artists of India, Tibet and Nepal. Through months of intense training and practice, our talented artists have mastered the art of painting both peaceful and wrathful features.
13 hours ago
Kechara Saraswati Arts (KSA) offers a comprehensive statue and tsa tsa painting service. We are able to paint both the face and body, using traditional Tibetan techniques and materials. KSA can transform a ‘bare’ or ‘raw’ object of art into a living masterpiece through a variety of painting techniques. There are several ‘finishes’ to choose from. Be it an ‘antique’ look, a fully-painted colourful finish or a simple ‘gold dusted look’, your imagination and heart’s wishes are fulfilled through KSA’s mastery and artistry in action. Our team have learnt the techniques of traditional statue painting from the finest artists of India, Tibet and Nepal. Through months of intense training and practice, our talented artists have mastered the art of painting both peaceful and wrathful features.
Unusual depiction of Lord Manjushri. I like it.
yesterday
Unusual depiction of Lord Manjushri. I like it.
Stunning!!!
yesterday
Stunning!!!
If we have eye problems, this is a good practice and it\'s simple- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=180488
2 days ago
If we have eye problems, this is a good practice and it's simple- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=180488
Many times in the morning my Oser girl will go sunbathe. She really enjoys it. Tsem Rinpoche
2 days ago
Many times in the morning my Oser girl will go sunbathe. She really enjoys it. Tsem Rinpoche
My Oser girl is very photogenic. Tsem Rinpoche
2 days ago
My Oser girl is very photogenic. Tsem Rinpoche
Vintage stunning thangka of Lord Tsongkapa with many other enlightened beings.
2 days ago
Vintage stunning thangka of Lord Tsongkapa with many other enlightened beings.
Beautiful antique thangka of Sakya Pandita
2 days ago
Beautiful antique thangka of Sakya Pandita
The last Lama-Ruler of Mongolia was 8th Jebtsundamba Khutughtu. He did not have a good ending as Mongolia \'fell\'. Read about him- https://bit.ly/2UD83oa
3 days ago
The last Lama-Ruler of Mongolia was 8th Jebtsundamba Khutughtu. He did not have a good ending as Mongolia 'fell'. Read about him- https://bit.ly/2UD83oa
Last Queen of Mongolia-Very interesting what happened to her and tragic too- https://bit.ly/2GcfhfF
3 days ago
Last Queen of Mongolia-Very interesting what happened to her and tragic too- https://bit.ly/2GcfhfF
The famous and powerful state oracle of Mongolia- Interesting and must read- 
 https://bit.ly/2Py3QhI
3 days ago
The famous and powerful state oracle of Mongolia- Interesting and must read- https://bit.ly/2Py3QhI
1984 Los Angeles-Left to right: Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, monk assistant to Zong Rinpoche and the 18 year old Tsem Rinpoche prior to ordination. Read more-  https://bit.ly/2C5OM7l
3 days ago
1984 Los Angeles-Left to right: Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, monk assistant to Zong Rinpoche and the 18 year old Tsem Rinpoche prior to ordination. Read more- https://bit.ly/2C5OM7l
Nice to see Blog Chat going on
3 days ago
Nice to see Blog Chat going on
In the middle of the metropolitan city of Bangkok near the upmarket shopping district is a chapel dedicated to Tara right in the centre of town. Lovely. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
In the middle of the metropolitan city of Bangkok near the upmarket shopping district is a chapel dedicated to Tara right in the centre of town. Lovely. Tsem Rinpoche
Cheeky and cute little He Wei is telling you to get a Dorje Shugden pamphlet now!!!
3 days ago
Cheeky and cute little He Wei is telling you to get a Dorje Shugden pamphlet now!!!
My little cute Oser girl doggie is always nearby. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
My little cute Oser girl doggie is always nearby. Tsem Rinpoche
Tsem Rinpoche\'s father with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The little girl is his brother\'s daughter. Her name is Tara.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche's father with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The little girl is his brother's daughter. Her name is Tara.
Our Gyenze Chapel in Kechara Forest Retreat is visited by people from all over Malaysia now. Many have had their wishes fulfilled.
3 days ago
Our Gyenze Chapel in Kechara Forest Retreat is visited by people from all over Malaysia now. Many have had their wishes fulfilled.
Very nice class going on in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Learning Dharma is the key to overcoming our mind that is unsettled. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
Very nice class going on in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Learning Dharma is the key to overcoming our mind that is unsettled. Tsem Rinpoche
Left to right: 103rd Gaden Tripa Lobsang Tenzin, Gaden Shartse Kensur Jampa Yeshe Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche.
3 days ago
Left to right: 103rd Gaden Tripa Lobsang Tenzin, Gaden Shartse Kensur Jampa Yeshe Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche.
Tsem Rinpoche holding the young incarnation of Zong Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche holding the young incarnation of Zong Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
In Gaden Monastery.

Left to right: Tenzin Trinley Rinpoche, Kari Kentrul Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche, Tsem Rinpoche, Gyalkhangtse Rinpoche, Kating Rinpoche and Genpa Rinpoche. Extreme right is the senior Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Monastery, Choyang Dulzin Kuten.
3 days ago
In Gaden Monastery. Left to right: Tenzin Trinley Rinpoche, Kari Kentrul Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche, Tsem Rinpoche, Gyalkhangtse Rinpoche, Kating Rinpoche and Genpa Rinpoche. Extreme right is the senior Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Monastery, Choyang Dulzin Kuten.
Tsem Rinpoche with the Abbots of Gaden Jangtse Monastery and Gaden Shartse Monastery escorting a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. This is in the main prayer hall of Gaden Monastery.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche with the Abbots of Gaden Jangtse Monastery and Gaden Shartse Monastery escorting a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. This is in the main prayer hall of Gaden Monastery.
Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Monastery
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Monastery
My father Mr. Lobsang Gyatso and myself. He came to Gaden Monastery to visit me. While he was alive he lived in Taiwan. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
My father Mr. Lobsang Gyatso and myself. He came to Gaden Monastery to visit me. While he was alive he lived in Taiwan. Tsem Rinpoche
The most precious Buddha Shakyamuni of Tibet. He is called Jowo Rinpoche and He is in the central Cathedral of Lhasa, Tibet. All the crowns, earrings, necklaces and jewels were constructed and offered by Je Tsongkapa onto this Buddha 600 years ago. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
The most precious Buddha Shakyamuni of Tibet. He is called Jowo Rinpoche and He is in the central Cathedral of Lhasa, Tibet. All the crowns, earrings, necklaces and jewels were constructed and offered by Je Tsongkapa onto this Buddha 600 years ago. Tsem Rinpoche
Click on picture to enlarge, I have something to share.
4 days ago
Click on picture to enlarge, I have something to share.
This is how you can practice Tantric Buddhas without initiation or commitment- https://bit.ly/2PstN28
4 days ago
This is how you can practice Tantric Buddhas without initiation or commitment- https://bit.ly/2PstN28
Many great lamas are pictured here together. I have met many of them and they are very learned and holy. Tsem Rinpoche
5 days ago
Many great lamas are pictured here together. I have met many of them and they are very learned and holy. Tsem Rinpoche
Do share this picture message with friends.
5 days ago
Do share this picture message with friends.
Faster, Faster!!! Can\'t you go any faster! We are late for our puja! Read on- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179695
5 days ago
Faster, Faster!!! Can't you go any faster! We are late for our puja! Read on- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179695
Has Pastor David achieved enlightenment under the bodhi tree?
5 days ago
Has Pastor David achieved enlightenment under the bodhi tree?
Very nice. Pastor Seng Piow\'s beautiful Kalarupa statue has finally arrived.
5 days ago
Very nice. Pastor Seng Piow's beautiful Kalarupa statue has finally arrived.
Animals are made to suffer so much. We should never add to their sufferings. We should never beat, abuse, use, kill or eat them. We should be loving with them or just leave them to live their lives.~Tsem Rinpoche
5 days ago
Animals are made to suffer so much. We should never add to their sufferings. We should never beat, abuse, use, kill or eat them. We should be loving with them or just leave them to live their lives.~Tsem Rinpoche
It will break your heart, but you need to see this- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179733



Thank you, Tsem Rinpoche
6 days ago
It will break your heart, but you need to see this- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179733 Thank you, Tsem Rinpoche
Find out what happened to this baby- https://bit.ly/2RdxM4o
6 days ago
Find out what happened to this baby- https://bit.ly/2RdxM4o
A very sad true story

Please sign to help end animal experimentation:
https://www.change.org/p/tell-neutrogena-to-stop-all-animal-testing
6 days ago
A very sad true story Please sign to help end animal experimentation: https://www.change.org/p/tell-neutrogena-to-stop-all-animal-testing
My grandaunt Nirgidma whom I have never met but learning more about her now. She lived and died in France. Tsem Rinpoche
6 days ago
My grandaunt Nirgidma whom I have never met but learning more about her now. She lived and died in France. Tsem Rinpoche
Did you know we can grow vegetables under water contrary to need the bright sun, earth and on the surface? Very interesting- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179595
6 days ago
Did you know we can grow vegetables under water contrary to need the bright sun, earth and on the surface? Very interesting- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179595
A very rare Buddha hardly seen. He is said to help us overcome laziness. Understand more- https://bit.ly/2EaEtk3
6 days ago
A very rare Buddha hardly seen. He is said to help us overcome laziness. Understand more- https://bit.ly/2EaEtk3
 
 
When you are sleeping, do you get disturbed by supernatural entities or re-occurring dreams that are frightening? Do you sometimes feel a presence in the room with you when sleeping? I have something here that might help you as I have been asked many times about these occurrences. - https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179116
1 week ago
When you are sleeping, do you get disturbed by supernatural entities or re-occurring dreams that are frightening? Do you sometimes feel a presence in the room with you when sleeping? I have something here that might help you as I have been asked many times about these occurrences. - https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179116
Foretelling the future in the Tibetan tradition- https://bit.ly/2AKzSl8
1 week ago
Foretelling the future in the Tibetan tradition- https://bit.ly/2AKzSl8
Malaysian Brickfields Chief Monk Sri Dhammaratana Fosters Harmony with Tibetan Buddhism- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=178837
2 weeks ago
Malaysian Brickfields Chief Monk Sri Dhammaratana Fosters Harmony with Tibetan Buddhism- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=178837
马来西亚十五碑锡兰佛寺达摩拉达纳长老与藏传佛教界建交- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179077
2 weeks ago
马来西亚十五碑锡兰佛寺达摩拉达纳长老与藏传佛教界建交- https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=179077
For high resolution download of this beautiful artwork of Dorje Shugden, please click here: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
2 weeks ago
For high resolution download of this beautiful artwork of Dorje Shugden, please click here: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
A stupa built dedicated to Dorje Shugden in Tibet.
2 weeks ago
A stupa built dedicated to Dorje Shugden in Tibet.
Repetitive Bad Dreams Disturbing Your Sleep?This might help you- https://bit.ly/2TTp8tw
2 weeks ago
Repetitive Bad Dreams Disturbing Your Sleep?This might help you- https://bit.ly/2TTp8tw
My sacred and ancient Bodhgaya Vajra Yogini immersed in red lights in her casing. So fortunate to even hear her name in this Kaliyuga times. Tsem Rinpoche
2 weeks ago
My sacred and ancient Bodhgaya Vajra Yogini immersed in red lights in her casing. So fortunate to even hear her name in this Kaliyuga times. Tsem Rinpoche
Click on "View All Photos" above to view more images

Videos On The Go

Please click on the images to watch video
  • His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    2 days ago
    His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    Trijang Rinpoche never gave up his devotion to Dorje Shugden no matter how much Tibetan government in exile pressured him to give up. He stayed loyal inspiring so many of us.
  • Very rare video of His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche the 10th, the all knowing and compassionate one. I pay deep respects to this attained being who has taken many rebirths since the time of Lord Buddha to be of benefit to sentient beings tirelessly. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 days ago
    Very rare video of His Holiness Panchen Rinpoche the 10th, the all knowing and compassionate one. I pay deep respects to this attained being who has taken many rebirths since the time of Lord Buddha to be of benefit to sentient beings tirelessly. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This bigfoot researcher gives good reasonings on bigfoot. Interesting short video.
    3 days ago
    This bigfoot researcher gives good reasonings on bigfoot. Interesting short video.
  • His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche of Gaden Shartse Monastery was one of the teachers of Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Here in this beautiful video is Geshe Kelsang Gyatso showing his centre to Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, then proceeding to sit down to receive teachings. For more information- https://bit.ly/2QNac1u
    5 days ago
    His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche of Gaden Shartse Monastery was one of the teachers of Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Here in this beautiful video is Geshe Kelsang Gyatso showing his centre to Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, then proceeding to sit down to receive teachings. For more information- https://bit.ly/2QNac1u
  • Tsem Rinpoche’s dog, Oser girl always sits on Rinpoche’s chair. When Rinpoche’s other dog, Dharma tries to get into the chair, he is chased away. Oser is the boss. She is possessive. Cute.
    2 weeks ago
    Tsem Rinpoche’s dog, Oser girl always sits on Rinpoche’s chair. When Rinpoche’s other dog, Dharma tries to get into the chair, he is chased away. Oser is the boss. She is possessive. Cute.
  • Lama Yeshe talks about how to practice at the beginning and at the end of each day during teachings given in London during the Lamas’ first European teaching tour in 1975. Lama Yeshe was a brilliant teacher and I wanted to share this with everyone so his teachings can reach more people. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 weeks ago
    Lama Yeshe talks about how to practice at the beginning and at the end of each day during teachings given in London during the Lamas’ first European teaching tour in 1975. Lama Yeshe was a brilliant teacher and I wanted to share this with everyone so his teachings can reach more people. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Our beautiful Dorje Shugden shop in the busiest part of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Many tourists visit our store and this area.
    2 weeks ago
    Our beautiful Dorje Shugden shop in the busiest part of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Many tourists visit our store and this area.
  • Living off the grid in Australia
    3 weeks ago
    Living off the grid in Australia
    A Jill Redwood is a jack of all trades, Jill built her own house on her property and lives entirely off the grid with no mains power or town water, mobile reception or television. Living on around $80 a week, Jill has over sixty animals to keep her company and an abundant garden that out serves as an organic supermarket right at her doorstep. Her main expenses are animal feed and the rates on her property. Watch this incredible three minute video and be inspired to live differently.
  • Kyabje Dagom Choktrul Rinpoche offering gold on a 350 year-old Dorje Shugden statue in his chapel in Lhasa. This is how Tibetans show homage and pay respect to a holy image. This chapel and statue of Dorje Shugden in Lhasa dedicated to Dorje Shugden was built by the Great 5th Dalai Lama. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    Kyabje Dagom Choktrul Rinpoche offering gold on a 350 year-old Dorje Shugden statue in his chapel in Lhasa. This is how Tibetans show homage and pay respect to a holy image. This chapel and statue of Dorje Shugden in Lhasa dedicated to Dorje Shugden was built by the Great 5th Dalai Lama. Tsem Rinpoche
  • My sweet little Oser girl is so photogenic and adorable. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    My sweet little Oser girl is so photogenic and adorable. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Heart Sutra sang by a monk for the modern crowd. Very interesting and beautiful. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    Heart Sutra sang by a monk for the modern crowd. Very interesting and beautiful. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Submerging powerful mantra stones in water at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
    3 weeks ago
    Submerging powerful mantra stones in water at Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia.
  • Wylfred explains in Chinese the benefits of mantra stones at Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia   |  黄明川以华语解释在马来西亚克切拉禅修林的玛尼堆(刻有心咒的石头)的利益
    3 weeks ago
    Wylfred explains in Chinese the benefits of mantra stones at Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia | 黄明川以华语解释在马来西亚克切拉禅修林的玛尼堆(刻有心咒的石头)的利益
  • My Oser girl and Dharma boy love the verandah where they can see the greens. Tsem Rinpoche
    3 weeks ago
    My Oser girl and Dharma boy love the verandah where they can see the greens. Tsem Rinpoche
  • If there were more schools like this, then our kids would grow up with more caring awareness and kind emotions towards our environment and the people around them. They would grow up knowing that chasing materialism is not going to bring any happiness. I hope very much more schools like this would materialise. I hope in my future life I can attend a school like this. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    If there were more schools like this, then our kids would grow up with more caring awareness and kind emotions towards our environment and the people around them. They would grow up knowing that chasing materialism is not going to bring any happiness. I hope very much more schools like this would materialise. I hope in my future life I can attend a school like this. Tsem Rinpoche
  • My Oser girl and Dharma boy in their cosy little bedroom next to me sleeping away. Cute.
    1 month ago
    My Oser girl and Dharma boy in their cosy little bedroom next to me sleeping away. Cute.
  • It is incredible how smart Oser girl is. She can steal the treat away from Dharma boy and so casually. Wow. She is so smart. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 month ago
    It is incredible how smart Oser girl is. She can steal the treat away from Dharma boy and so casually. Wow. She is so smart. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Kechara Forest Retreat Dogs. Dharma boy is tiny and trying to scare off big boy Johnny. Johnny is so patient and just ignores Dharma. They are both cute and both live in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 months ago
    Kechara Forest Retreat Dogs. Dharma boy is tiny and trying to scare off big boy Johnny. Johnny is so patient and just ignores Dharma. They are both cute and both live in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Tsem Rinpoche
  • BREAKING EYEWITNESS FOOTAGE: Workers violently punched, kicked, cussed out, & left sheep to die on dozens of Scottish farms 💔 Sheep bled after rough shearing & were stitched up without painkillers.–From Peta2
    2 months ago
    BREAKING EYEWITNESS FOOTAGE: Workers violently punched, kicked, cussed out, & left sheep to die on dozens of Scottish farms 💔 Sheep bled after rough shearing & were stitched up without painkillers.–From Peta2
  • Super cute seal and so gentle. Must watch this video and realize we are all one. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 months ago
    Super cute seal and so gentle. Must watch this video and realize we are all one. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Legendary Heart sings “Stairway to Heaven” in tribute to Led Zeppelin. Incredible tribute and rendition. Everyone is blown away. TR
    2 months ago
    Legendary Heart sings “Stairway to Heaven” in tribute to Led Zeppelin. Incredible tribute and rendition. Everyone is blown away. TR
  • In a low-income neighbourhood, this man is growing his own organic produce, and giving extras away for free to neighbours who can’t afford fresh ingredients from the store. Must watch!
    2 months ago
    In a low-income neighbourhood, this man is growing his own organic produce, and giving extras away for free to neighbours who can’t afford fresh ingredients from the store. Must watch!
  • Neat little video
    2 months ago
    Neat little video
  • It is nice to see sangha release animals into the wild. Gen Kunchok Palden and Chodrak contributed to releasing of frogs back into the wild. This is wonderful. Compassion is the mainstay of all spirituality. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 months ago
    It is nice to see sangha release animals into the wild. Gen Kunchok Palden and Chodrak contributed to releasing of frogs back into the wild. This is wonderful. Compassion is the mainstay of all spirituality. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This is a special ‘carpet’ for dogs that you hide their snacks and they have to go digging for it. It is challenging and fun where they use their nose, paws and all to dig and find the snacks in between. This dog play carpet is ordered online. You can see little Zopa baby who is a Kechara resident doggie looking for the snacks in this cute video. She is kept busy and entertained! Tsem Rinpoche
    2 months ago
    This is a special ‘carpet’ for dogs that you hide their snacks and they have to go digging for it. It is challenging and fun where they use their nose, paws and all to dig and find the snacks in between. This dog play carpet is ordered online. You can see little Zopa baby who is a Kechara resident doggie looking for the snacks in this cute video. She is kept busy and entertained! Tsem Rinpoche
  • Kechara Forest Retreat in Bentong, Malaysia’s dog Pema is super adorable and cute. Everyone loves her. She is wearing a Manjushri blessing pendant.
    3 months ago
    Kechara Forest Retreat in Bentong, Malaysia’s dog Pema is super adorable and cute. Everyone loves her. She is wearing a Manjushri blessing pendant.
  • Spontaneous trance in Tibet by powerful healing Protector Dorje Shugden of a monk who usually takes trance.
    3 months ago
    Spontaneous trance in Tibet by powerful healing Protector Dorje Shugden of a monk who usually takes trance.
  • 喀切玛波向詹杜固仁波切献供养
    3 months ago
    喀切玛波向詹杜固仁波切献供养
    喀切玛波护法降神,向詹杜固仁波切献供曼扎及身语意之供养,同时也加持马来西亚克切拉禅修林道场。喀切玛波护法乃古时候的紫玛护法,他是藏地首座佛教寺院桑耶寺的护法神
  • Huge Chenresig statue being built. Very beautiful.
    3 months ago
    Huge Chenresig statue being built. Very beautiful.
  • Sacred Kache Marpo in trance of oracle makes offerings to Tsem Rinpoche and blesses the temple in Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia. Kache Marpo in ancient times was known as Tsiu Marpo the great protector of Samye Monastery which is the first monastery of Tibet.
    3 months ago
    Sacred Kache Marpo in trance of oracle makes offerings to Tsem Rinpoche and blesses the temple in Kechara Forest Retreat in Malaysia. Kache Marpo in ancient times was known as Tsiu Marpo the great protector of Samye Monastery which is the first monastery of Tibet.
  • This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    1 years ago
    This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    This video is thought-provoking and very interesting. Watch! Thanks so much to our friends at LIVEKINDLY.
  • Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
    1 years ago
    Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
  • BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
    1 years ago
    BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
    1 years ago
    Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
  • Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
    1 years ago
    Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
  • Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 years ago
    Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    1 years ago
    This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    she received “one last visit from an old friend” 💔💔
  • Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
    1 years ago
    Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
  • Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
    1 years ago
    Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
  • Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant  Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
    1 years ago
    Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
  • Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
    1 years ago
    Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
  • Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
    1 years ago
    Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
  • What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    1 years ago
    What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    Sick animals are more profitable... farms calculate how close to death they can keep animals without killing them. That's the business model. How quickly they can be made to grow, how tightly they can be packed, how much or how little can they eat, how sick they can get without dying... We live in a world in which it's conventional to treat an animal like a block of wood. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer
  • This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
    1 years ago
    This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
  • SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    1 years ago
    SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    This happens daily in slaughterhouse so you can get your pork and Bak ku teh. Stop eating meat.

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Just post your name and your question below and one of our pastors will provide you with an answer.

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CHAT PICTURES

4 hours ago
1984 Los Angeles- Left to right: Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, monk assistant to Zong Rinpoche and the 18 year old Tsem Rinpoche prior to ordination.
3 days ago
1984 Los Angeles- Left to right: Geshe Tsultrim Gyeltsen, His Holiness Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, monk assistant to Zong Rinpoche and the 18 year old Tsem Rinpoche prior to ordination.
Very nice class going on in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Learning Dharma is the key to overcoming our mind that is unsettled. Tsem Rinpoche
3 days ago
Very nice class going on in Kechara Forest Retreat-Malaysia. Learning Dharma is the key to overcoming our mind that is unsettled. Tsem Rinpoche
Tsem Rinpoche holding the young incarnation of Zong Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche holding the young incarnation of Zong Rinpoche in Gaden Shartse Monastery.
Left to right: 103rd Gaden Tripa Lobsang Tenzin, Gaden Shartse Kensur Jampa Yeshe Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche.
3 days ago
Left to right: 103rd Gaden Tripa Lobsang Tenzin, Gaden Shartse Kensur Jampa Yeshe Rinpoche and Tsem Rinpoche.
In Gaden Monastery. Left to right: Tenzin Trinley Rinpoche, Kari Kentrul Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche, Tsem Rinpoche, Gyalkhangtse Rinpoche, Kating Rinpoche and Genpa Rinpoche. Extreme right is the senior Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Monastery, Choyang Dulzin Kuten.
3 days ago
In Gaden Monastery. Left to right: Tenzin Trinley Rinpoche, Kari Kentrul Rinpoche, Zong Rinpoche, Tsem Rinpoche, Gyalkhangtse Rinpoche, Kating Rinpoche and Genpa Rinpoche. Extreme right is the senior Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Monastery, Choyang Dulzin Kuten.
Tsem Rinpoche with the Abbots of Gaden Jangtse Monastery and Gaden Shartse Monastery escorting a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. This is in the main prayer hall of Gaden Monastery.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche with the Abbots of Gaden Jangtse Monastery and Gaden Shartse Monastery escorting a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. This is in the main prayer hall of Gaden Monastery.
Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Monastery.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche in Gaden Monastery.
Tsem Rinpoche's father Mr. Lobsang Gyatso and Rinpoche. He came to Gaden Monastery to visit Rinpoche. While he was alive he lived in Taiwan.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche's father Mr. Lobsang Gyatso and Rinpoche. He came to Gaden Monastery to visit Rinpoche. While he was alive he lived in Taiwan.
Tsem Rinpoche's father with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The little girl is Rinpoche's brother's daughter. Her name is Tara.
3 days ago
Tsem Rinpoche's father with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The little girl is Rinpoche's brother's daughter. Her name is Tara.
3 days ago
Thanks to Yong Soo Chin for sponsoring today's lunch ingredients and also donation to Kechara Food Bank in memorial of her father-in-law Mr Ng Seng Kee. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 days ago
Thanks to Yong Soo Chin for sponsoring today's lunch ingredients and also donation to Kechara Food Bank in memorial of her father-in-law Mr Ng Seng Kee. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Efforts to feed the poor are nothing new. Kechara Soup Kitchen practices of collecting food waste and turning it into meals for the hungry. The generous support from Tesco Malaysia and AEON Retail Malaysia have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thank you very much! #Kechara #foodbank #hungerknowsnobarriers - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
5 days ago
Efforts to feed the poor are nothing new. Kechara Soup Kitchen practices of collecting food waste and turning it into meals for the hungry. The generous support from Tesco Malaysia and AEON Retail Malaysia have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thank you very much! #Kechara #foodbank #hungerknowsnobarriers - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Lovely DIY candle made to offer to Buddha. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Lovely DIY candle made to offer to Buddha. Lin Mun KSDS
Isn’t it great to see family engaging in pilgrimage & dharma work together. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Isn’t it great to see family engaging in pilgrimage & dharma work together. Lin Mun KSDS
Pastor Gim Lee gave an interesting introduction to Green Tara during the recentl pilgrimage cum camp event. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Pastor Gim Lee gave an interesting introduction to Green Tara during the recentl pilgrimage cum camp event. Lin Mun KSDS
So glad to see family doing light offering to Buddha together. Great bonding. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
So glad to see family doing light offering to Buddha together. Great bonding. Lin Mun KSDS
KSDS pilgrimage cum camp 2018 - Prostration to Lama Tsongkhapa. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
KSDS pilgrimage cum camp 2018 - Prostration to Lama Tsongkhapa. Lin Mun KSDS
Teacher Melinda & teacher Asyley guided the youngest children to take refuge & do prostration to Dzambala. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Teacher Melinda & teacher Asyley guided the youngest children to take refuge & do prostration to Dzambala. Lin Mun KSDS
Zoey is a happy girl & enjoy coming to dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Zoey is a happy girl & enjoy coming to dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
Video recording for KSDS Graduation 2018. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Video recording for KSDS Graduation 2018. Lin Mun KSDS
6 days ago
Rain or shine we will be there to distribute surplus food to the needy families living around Jlns Sungai. Thank you to all volunteers for turning up on a wet afternoon. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
1 week ago
Rain or shine we will be there to distribute surplus food to the needy families living around Jlns Sungai. Thank you to all volunteers for turning up on a wet afternoon. - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
A visit was paid to this family from Petaling Jaya. Our client’s wife has admitted to hospital due to stroke. Therefore, client has to stop working temporarily because he needs to take care of the young daughter who has learning disabilities. Let’s send best wishes to the wife for a speedy recovery! ❤️ #Kechara #foodbank #care - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
1 week ago
A visit was paid to this family from Petaling Jaya. Our client’s wife has admitted to hospital due to stroke. Therefore, client has to stop working temporarily because he needs to take care of the young daughter who has learning disabilities. Let’s send best wishes to the wife for a speedy recovery! ❤️ #Kechara #foodbank #care - Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
The threatening rain and the shortage of volunteers tonight did not stopped us from our regular Monday night distribution. Kudos to all who turned up to help. Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
1 week ago
The threatening rain and the shortage of volunteers tonight did not stopped us from our regular Monday night distribution. Kudos to all who turned up to help. Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
The Promise
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  Tsem Rinpoche's Long Life Prayer by H.H. Trijang Choktrul Rinpoche
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  Vajrayogini Stupa Fund
  White Tara Mantra Bank Project
  Rinpoche's Medical Fund
  Dana Offerings
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Dorje Shugden
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