Pemako – Vajrayogini’s Sacred Body

May 16, 2013 | Views: 3,450

(By Tsem Rinpoche)

Pemako is located in southeast Tibet. In Tibetan, the word “Pemako” means “Lotus Array” or “Lotus of Great Bliss”. It is a land that intrigues many Western explorers as it is thought to be the sacred land of nectar and bliss as described in Buddhist scriptures.

Pemako is thought to be one of the 16 earthly paradises, a promised land where humanity will survive in the event of worldwide famine or calamities. It was also referred to by Guru Rinpoche as the “supreme hidden land”. Guru Rinpoche had concealed 108 “beyuls” or “hidden valleys” in the Himalayas to be revealed at specific times during the degenerate age. Shambala is the greatest hidden valley, Pemako is another one of them. The Buddhist texts describe these hidden valleys as being reminiscent of paradise. They can only be reached with enormous hardship, and those who force their way through may encounter failure or even, death.

The landscape and geography of Pemako is shaped like that of Vajrayogini’s sacred body in a sleeping posture form.

  • Her head is Kangri Kangpo (White Snow Mountain)
  • Her two bosoms are Namche Barwa and Gyala Peri (both mountains)
  • The lower part of her body lies in Yang Sang (upper Siang region of Arunachal Pradesh)
  • Her sacred triangle is at the confluence of Siang and Yang Sang (rivers)
  • Her sacred vulva is at Kila Yangzom
  • Her navel is a small Nyingmapa monastery called Rinchenpung 

The lakes, rocks and forestry are often regarded as being especially sacred as it is the worldly abode of supernatural beings. Gathering of resources is allowed, but nothing in excess. The animals are protected as no killing is tolerated… because of this some endangered species have called this place their home, like the Himalayan Black Bear and the Musk Deer. The sacredness of beyul’s also discourages humans hurting other humans.

In the beginning of the 20th century, many natives of the Kham region made the long trek to Pemako seeking refuge. Between the 1990 to the early 2000’s, many expeditions were done by Westerners. These expeditions were mainly kayaking expeditions as the land was famous for whitewater kayaking.

I have added a lot of information below about Pemako. I have added it for educational purposes, and have added the links to the original source for those who wish to know more… I wish for everyone to be educated on beyul’s and Pemako. I especially hope for people to aspire to trek in Pemako.

Tsem Rinpoche

 


 

 

PEMAKO: highlight

[Extracted from: http://www.aborcountrytravels.com/lower-pemako-trek.html]

 

For nearly 2000 years the nation of an earthly paradise or Shangri-La hidden amoung the peaks of Asia has captivated the human imagination. Western explorers eombed the region in search of this land of bliss and nectar described in ancient Buddhist texts as the Pemako or the Lotus land.

According to Buddhist tradition Pemako is one of the 16th earthly paradise, a promised land free of worry, the ultimate hidden haven. The place is where, it is prophesied that the seed of humanity will thrive at the end of the world in famine and calamities.

In the beginning of the 20th century many Khampas from Tibet made a long, ardous trek to Pemako in quest of succour and refuge. They are one of the major inhabitants of the region, along with The Adis, The Mishmis who were the original inhabitants here. The region is a melting pot of different tribal cultures, where all the tribes exist in complete harmony amoung themselves and the nature. Walking through Pemako one can see Adi, Memba, Khampa and Mishmi villages with their distinctive culture, faith and lifestyle.

The Pemako is consecrated to female divinity of Dorje Phagmo and its sacred geography is mapped to the body of this sleeping goddess. Her head is the Kangri Kangpo, her two breasts is Namche Barwa and Gyala Peri respectively. The lower part of her body lies in Yangsang or the innermost Pemako which is the upper Siang region of Arunachal Pradesh. In the confluence of Siang (Tsangpo) and Yangsang is the sacred tringle Kila Yangzom the vulva of Goddess Dorje Phagmo. This the supreme of scared lands is now open to the world to discover and marvel.

Every year pilgrims traverse the area on Kora (circumbulation). Coverung the scared Devakota, the gathering place of Dakinis, The holy Titapori mountain, Penashree and Tiru Tala (Eko Dumbing for Adis). 

 


 


Photo Of The Day – Spine Of Vajra Yogini

[Extracted from: http://en.paperblog.com/photo-of-the-day-spine-of-vajra-yogini-303973/]

 

The Siang River, as it is called in Arunachal Pradesh, is one of the mightiest of rivers in Asia. Known as Yarlung Tsangpo in Tibet, Brahmaputra in India, and Jamuna in Bangladesh, the 2840 km long river travels for 1600km in high Tibet, before taking a mysterious U-turn where it forms the world’s deepest gorges, and entering Arunachal Pradesh in India. The most charming references for this water body can be found in Buddhism, where each and every element the river crosses through is regarded as extremely sacred and are an actual part of Vajra Yogini’s body, as the land of Pemako.

 


 

 

THE TIGERS of PEMAKO

[Source: http://2007.tibetmagazine.net/english/2007-1/8C78C751ADD8C4AA5461F2C13CF2578E.html]

 

 

 Namjagbarwa Mountain Summit. Photo by Lu Zhi

 

We struggle through deep snow toward a pass, the Doxiong La. On the other side in the remote forests of Pemako or Motuo are the last tigers in Tibet. Far below us, the Yarlung Tsangpo enters the deepest gorge in the world, rushing between Gyala Pelri and Namche Barwa, both peaks   over 7000m high, then turns east and finally south toward India. With me are three coworkers, Lu Zhi of Peking University, Zhang Endi of the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Zhang Hong of the Tibet Forestry Department, as well as eighteen porters to carry our one-month supply of food and equipment. Our task is to survey the wildlife in this isolated region guarded by rugged ranges on three sides and the Indian border on the fourth. It is mid-May 2000, and the mountain passes are open only from now to October.

We hurry on, away from the desolation of rock and snow, toward a basin with stands of fir and birch where we will camp. Two monal pheasants glide downslope and we record their presence in our notebooks. The region had been given protection as the Yarlung Tsangpo Great Canyon National Reserve, 9168 sq. km in size, the previous year. About 15,000 people, mostly Tibetan, Moinpa, and Lhopa live in scattered villages throughout the reserve. Many practice agriculture,  converting forest to field, and many hunt wildlife such as takin, goral, muskdeer, macaque monkeys, and black bear for meat, hides, and other products. We have come to assess the impact of such activities. 

 

 

Renchengpeng Monastery in Metdog. By Schaller

 

I am particularly interested in the status of tigers. Once half a century ago, tigers were so abundant in parts of China that they were exterminated as pests. Now this symbol of power and strength is on the verge of extinction in the country. Stragglers from Russia visit northeast China, though some may stay awhile, and a few tigers endure in the southeast. Does Pemako with its last Tibetan tigers have a viable breeding population? Tigers were widespread here as recently as 1980, we are told, but now they are rare. Yet villagers complain to the government that tigers kill their cattle and horses.

Tigers and other wildlife do, I hope, have a safe haven in Pemako because it is a sacred place. I can describe a landscape its mountains, forests, and wildlife. However, a place may have meaning beyond its reality in that people are aware of hidden and intangible forces that I cannot see. The Indian sage Padmasambhava visited Tibet in the eight century and established Buddhism by converting belligerent deities and demons into protectors of the new faith. During his wanderings he created hidden lands or beyul, sanctuaries of inner peace and outer tranquility, earthy paradises filled with mysterious power. He wrote guidebooks to these hidden lands and secreted them, knowing that those of faith would ultimately find them. Dechen Pemako, The Lotus of Great Bliss, is one such beyul, not identified until the 17th century. Is wildlife thriving in this land of peace and purity? 

 

 

 

Tropical warmth wraps itself around us as we descend.  Bamboo, wild bananas, and tree ferns crowd the path. Leeches, malarial mosquitoes, biting flies, and heavy downpours hide from me the spiritual aspects of this land. The Monpa and Lhopa practice slash-and-burn agriculture in which forest is cut down and burned and a crop planted for a year or two before the fields are abandoned.  More forest is then cut, often on steep slopes to cause erosion and landslides. The main crop on the slopes is maize, used to make an alcoholic drink, the ancient forests sacrificed for a beverage.  I wondered if the people could not instead have a sustainable income from the forest by collecting and selling edible mushrooms, medicinal plants, conifer seeds for making cooking oil, and other products. We see no wildlife other than fleeting flocks of babblers and warblers and an occasional cryptic thrush. Tigers? Yes, sometimes one wanders through, we are told at villages, but it does not remain.

We are not only in a sacred hidden land but also are moving through the body of the female deity Vajrayogini who envelops the region with her protective spirit. For example, the Yarlung Tsangpo is her central energy channel, Gyala Pelri symbolizes her head, Namche Barwa one of her breasts, and the small gompa Rinchenpung her navel, the center of bliss. As ecological pilgrims we too travel to Rinchenpung high in the hills, braving whatever adversity put in our paths by demons. Yet it is clear that Vajrayogini has not been able to instill a reverence and compassion for all living beings, the basic precept of Buddhism, in all those who make Pemako their home.

 


 

 

THE ANCIENTS
Shangri-La Found

[Extracted from: http://www.thelivingmoon.com/43ancients/02files/Shangri_La.html]
 

 

 

The following is an article that appeared in newspapers around the country, around January 8, 1999.  It was sent to us by a reader:

From The Chicago Tribune News Service

EXPLORERS FIND ELUSIVE SHANGRI-LA IN WORLD’S DEEPEST KNOWN GORGE

No record exists of people ever having seen the 100 foot-high waterfall and lush subtropical garden in the Tibetan Himalayas until now

WASHINGTON – Explorers finally have found Shangri-La.

It might not be quite the storied, verdant, Utopia Himalayan paradise of James Hilton’s 1933 novel “Lost Horizon” and subsequent movie of the same name. But it is verdant, it is a kind of paradise, and it is hidden deep within Tibet’s Himalayas in a monstrously steep gorge within a gorge. There is no record of any person having visited, or even seen, the area before. 

Tucked beneath a mountain spur at a sharp bend of the Tsangpo River Gorge, where the cliff sides are only 75 yards apart and cast perpetual shadows, the place failed to show up even on satellite surveillance photographs of the area.

“If there is a Shangri-La , this is it,” said Rebecca Martin, director of the National Geographic Society’s Expeditions Board, which sponsored the trek. “This is a pretty startling discovery, especially in a time when many people are saying, “What’s left to discover?”

Tentatively named by the explorers the Hidden Falls of the Tsangpo and located in a forbidding region called Pemako that Tibetans consider highly sacred, the elusive site was reached by American explorers Ian Baker, Ken Storm Jr. and Brian Harvey late last year, though the society did not make its confirmation of their success official until Thursday.

In addition to a spectacular 100-foot-high waterfall- long rumored but until now undocumented- they found a subtropical garden between a 23,000 foot and a 26,000 foot mountain, at the bottom of a 4,000 foot high cliff.

According to Martin, it’s the world’ deepest mountain gorge.

“It’s a place teeming with life.” Storm said in telephone interview from his office in the Minneapolis suburb of Burnsville. “It’s a terribly wild river, with many small waterfalls, heavy rapids and a tremendous current surging through. Yet there are all kinds of flora; subtropical pine, rhododendrons, craggy fir and hemlock and spruce on the hillsides. It’s lush. Just a tremendous wild garden landscape.”

The animals there include a rare, horned creature called the Takin, sacred to Tibetan Buddhists.

Difficult as the gorge was to reach, Storm said one of the hardest aspects of the expedition was leaving to return to civilization.

“The last we saw of it was looking down… with clouds sealing the gorge and side-stream waterfalls jetting out into the river,” he said. “it’s probably the most romantic landscape I’d ever seen.”

This was the seventh expedition that Baker, a Tibet scholar living in Katmandu, led into the Himalayas in search of the mythic falls.

In addition to Storm, a book and game dealer turned explorer, and Harvey, a National Geographic photographer, the team included another scholar, Hamid Sardar of Cambridge, Mass., two Tibetan hunters, a Sherpa guide and eight porters – though Baker, Storm and Harvey were the only ones to make the demanding descent to the gorge and falls. 

Among other things, their discovery proves that two great rivers of Asia – the Tsangpo, which runs completely across Tibet, and the mighty Brahmaputra, which runs through the Indian state of Assam and Bangladesh to the Bay of Bengal–are connected.

Reminiscent of the fabled “source of the Nile” that English explorers Richard Burton and John Spede raced each other to find in the middle of the 19th century–both making controversial claims to have found it first–the Tsangpo falls and gorge proved so far beyond explorers’ reach that they were declared nonexistant. 

The southern approach up the Brahmaputra posed the most obstacles.

“It’s tremendously difficult terrain of jungles and insects and tigers,” Storm said. “The lower gorge area was protected by Abhors and Mishmi, Burmese tribal groups. They protected that area pretty fiercely, and early British attempts to penetrate were frustrated.”

In 1911, two British explorers were able to locate all but 30 to 40 miles of the river connection. A local guide named Kintup was later hired to continue into the inner gorge and try to find the sacred place by traveling as a Buddhist pilgrim.

He claimed to have found a connection between the two rivers but said the only high waterfall was not on the Tsangpo but up a smaller tributary.

In 1924, British botanist Francis Kingdon-Ward advanced to a point that narrowed the unknown stretch of the river to three or four miles. He found a waterfall as well but measured it at only 30 feet. Finding further penetration impossible because of the steepness and narrowness of the gorge and bad weather, he turned back, declaring the long sought high falls nonexistent.

Although the Tsangpo River starts at 7,000 feet above sea level, it rapidly descends and cuts through the Tibet plateau by way of the only gap in the Himalayas open to the heavy weather of the Indian plains and wetlands below.

“The weather pours up from Assam, which is one of the wettest places on Earth, and you have notoriously terrible weather in there.” Storm said. “You can go weeks if not months with clouds and rains and snow at the higher elevation. You have a river literally eating its way through these mountains in this great gorge.”

Lasting 17 days, Baker’s expedition approached the Tsangpo from the north, following animal trails and the advice of their Tibetan hunters and descending some 4,000 feet. Using mountaineers’ ropes to get down the last 80 feet of the cliff, they found themselves at the “great falls,” which they measured with laser range finders – a Shangri-La just a quarter of a mile from where Kingdon-Ward turned back.

“It’s a powerful sight to experience,” said Storm, who said he plans to return. “it’s a rather humbling feeling just to have taken part.” – END

 

***

 

When Ian Baker finally found the legendary Hidden Falls at the bottom of the world’s deepest gorge, was he really on the verge of paradise? Or would he have to settle for fame and fortune?

The Washington Post – Washington, D.C. 
Author:  William McGowan 
Date:  Jun 6, 1999 

In January the National Geographic Society announced that (Ian) Baker had led an expedition into a remote mountainous area of southeastern Tibet called Pemako– “The Hidden Land of the Opening Lotus,” as it is known in Tibetan. There he had discovered a long-rumored but never before documented major waterfall on Tibet’s mighty Tsangpo River. Clawing their way down mist-cloaked, nearly sheer 4,000-foot cliffs into a rocky gorge-within-a-gorge so deep it remains in perpetual shadow and can’t even be seen on satellite surveillance photographs, Baker and another team member were able to reach and measure a waterfall approximately 108 feet high, naming it Hidden Falls.

“It’s not just a place to go take pictures,” Baker recalls the lama explaining. But once Baker conveyed his serious interest in the spirituality of the search, the lama told him to come back in the summer, and be prepared to spend a month alone in a cave. When Baker returned, the lama sent him off with two nomads who led him to a cave deep in a remote valley.

But he hadn’t abandoned his interest in the beyul tradition. The lama who’d sent him off to the cave told him beyuls were described in obscure, coded texts that dated from the 8th century. Eager to get his hands on some of them, Baker sought help from the Dalai Lama himself. In Dharmsala on academic business in 1987, he expressed his interest during an audience. Getting a “faraway” look in his eye, as Baker recalls it, the Dalai Lama directed a monk to help Baker locate a dusty tome from a high, dimly lit shelf in the Dharmsala library. This, like other similar texts, was, as Baker puts it, a kind of “Fodor’s Guide to the fourth dimension,” which advised pilgrims on how best to navigate landscapes that are invested with spiritual and mystical properties. Baker eventually expanded his collection of beyul texts to nine.

Space Imaging’s IKONOS Satellite Images Prove Crucial for Tsangpo River Expedition in Tibet – Kayak Expedition Team Conquers One of the Last Great Adventures on Earth

DENVER, May 23, 2002 – During a recent descent of Tibet’s Tsangpo River by kayak, satellite images from Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite proved to be a crucial planning and mapping tool for the 87-man Outside Tsangpo Expedition Team. Sponsored by Outside Magazine and Chevrolet’s Chevy Avalanche, a team of the world’s best expeditionary kayakers joined forces to attempt the historic first descent of the Tsangpo Gorge. The Tsangpo River is the highest river and the deepest gorge in the world. The river is thought by many professional adventurers to contain the most feared whitewater on the planet.

Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite took this 1-meter color image of Rainbow Falls and Hidden Falls along the Tsangpo River May 9, 2000. 

 

 

After a 1998 National Geographic Society-sponsored kayaking expedition of the Tsangpo River, Space Imaging took the world’s first commercial high-resolution satellite images of the remote Tibetan river. That expedition was called off before completion because of the tragic whitewater death of a kayaker.

Then, in the summer of 1999, Scott Lindgren, a 29-year old world-class kayaker and Emmy-award winning cameraman, started planning to take a team to descend the Tsangpo. He turned to Space Imaging for the IKONOS satellite images that were taken in May 2000.

“The satellite images were an absolute key to the success of the expedition,” said team leader Lindgren. “The images were like being in a helicopter above the water. They gave us a bird’s-eye view of the entire river before we ever left the U.S. Some areas of the Tsangpo Gorge have never been seen by man, that is until IKONOS took these amazing pictures.”

Showing rapids, steep canyon walls, trails and mountain passes, the set of 20 images, valued at more than $48,000, was loaded into the team’s laptop computers and viewed with ERDAS’ ViewFinder software. The very accurate, high-resolution images allowed the team, by using GPS coordinates, to navigate along specific sections of the river and know in advance what lay ahead. The team developed entry and exit waypoints that were then programmed into GPS receivers to keep the team on course. Large image-maps, overlaid with latitude and longitude grids, were also printed out and laminated, and were used daily by both on- and off-river teams.

“We spent days pouring over the satellite image-maps. They gave us a far stronger understanding of what we were to encounter than I ever expected. I can’t imagine doing another expedition of this magnitude without satellite imagery,” said Lindgren.

The entire expedition, which started on Jan. 21, 2002, took more than a month to complete. Not only did they complete the first descent of the Tsangpo Gorge, but they were also only the third Western expedition ever to traverse the Gorge, the first two being done on foot – Frank Kingdon Ward in 1924 and Ken Storm, Jr.’s team in 1998.

Lindgren and other team members filmed the historic trek for Outside Television Productions. The expedition TV special, “Into the Tsangpo Gorge,” will air on NBC Sports this Sunday, May 26, at 2:30 p.m. ET. Outside Magazine’s coverage of the expedition will be its cover story in the July issue and is currently featured on Outside Magazine’s Web site at www.outsidemag.com. Also, Lindgren is scheduled to be interviewed on NBC’s Today show on Friday, May 24. 

 


 

 

Beyul of the Himalaya

[Source: http://www.sacredland.org/beyul/]

Throughout the famed Himalayan mountains are large, hidden valleys known as beyul, places of peace and refuge revered by Tibetan Buddhists. These secret lands of legend have drawn Buddhist seekers for centuries, and one called Pemako is thought to have been the inspiration for Shangri-La, the mystical Himalayan utopia described in James Hilton’s 1933 novel “Lost Horizon.” Because of their remote and isolated location, and the respect with which they have been treated by the communities that reside in or near them, the beyul contain high levels of biodiversity in a setting of tremendous beauty. However, outside influences like globalization, nationalization, cultural assimilation and tourism have begun to erode the power of the traditional beyul concept in many places, while development encroaches on the physical landscape. If modern conservation and management efforts are to be successful, they must find ways to preserve and integrate longstanding traditional beliefs and practices. In his introduction to the Ian Baker book “Heart of the World,” the Dalai Lama writes, “From a Buddhist perspective, sacred environments such as Pemako are not places to escape the world, but to enter it more deeply.”

 

The Land and Its People

The beyul are large mountain valleys, sometimes encompassing hundreds of square kilometers, found in the Buddhist areas of the Himalaya in Nepal, Tibet, India and Bhutan. They originate from the beliefs of the Nyingmapa sect of Tibetan Buddhism, which has a rich tradition of respect for natural sites. According to ancient Buddhist texts, the beyul were preserves of Padmasambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, who introduced Buddhism to Tibet and founded the Nyingmapa tradition in the eighth century. Information on their locations was kept on scrolls hidden under rocks and inside caves, monasteries and stupa (shrines). Some beyul are now inhabited, others are occasionally visited by spiritual seekers and adventurers, and some are still unknown. The total number of beyul, discovered and not, is often said to be 108.

One of the most legendary beyul is Pemako (“the Secret Land Shaped Like a Lotus”), in southeastern Tibet, east of a dramatic Tsangpo River gorge known as the Great Bend, where the river curves sharply into the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. The Tsangpo Gorge is three times deeper than the Grand Canyon, with enormous waterfalls in which the river drops more than 8,000 feet in a 150-mile stretch. These waterfalls, where several explorers have lost their lives, are said to be a gateway to a secret inner part of Beyul Pemako. The Tsangpo River connects Pemako to one of Tibet’s most sacred mountains, Mount Kailash, and the landscape of the Tsangpo-Pemako area is said to represent the body of the goddess Dorje Pagmo, with the river her spine and the surrounding peaks her breasts.

In Nepal and Tibet, around Mount Everest, are the Khenbalung, Khumbu, Rolwaling, Rongshar, Kyirong and Nubri sacred valleys. Khumbu was discovered by ancestors of the Sherpa people, who had left Tibet to escape religious persecution in the 15th and 16th centuries. They entered the valley to seek refuge and made a new homeland there. Buddhist monasteries and sacred mountains have brought many spiritual travelers to Khumbu, more accessible than the mysterious Pemako.

Many other beyul are known only to local people and they often transcend political boundaries. The exact geographical locations of beyul are often debated because their locations are also spiritual. A person might follow instructions from the ancient texts but still not be able to see or experience the beyul if not in the proper spiritual state.

Beyul are religious conceptions, but because of the reverence with which they are treated by local residents, hunting, fighting and disturbing the natural landscape are considered inappropriate behaviors and are avoided. As a result, beyul have become significant oases of biodiversity as well. They typically have plentiful water coming from the surrounding mountains, and their terrain is covered with forests, lakes, alpine meadows, and snow and ice fields. These valleys cover large areas and have vast elevation ranges. Their size and topographic variations provide a home for a diverse array of plants and animals; their isolation and inaccessibility generally means low levels of human disturbance.

Within the beyul, particular natural features such as lakes, rocks and patches of forest are often regarded as especially sacred because they are home to supernatural beings. Some gathering of plant resources, such as medicinal plants, firewood and timber, is allowed, but collectors make sure they have not harvested more than is needed. The animals in beyul are protected by the Buddhist taboo against killing. The residents of the Kharta and Rongshar areas in Tibet, for example, challenged British explorers who wanted to hunt when they arrived in 1921. Endangered species that live in beyul include the snow leopard, musk deer, red panda and Himalayan black bear.

The sacredness of the beyul also means that human conflicts are spiritually discouraged. In Beyul Dremoshung in the Indian state of Sikkim, two groups, the Lepchas and Bhutias, hold an annual festival that commemorates the signing of a peace treaty. The festival celebrates the deity of the beyul’s Mount Kangchendjunga, who is supposed to have witnessed the treaty signing.

 

Current Challenges and Preservation Efforts

Today, most beyul in the Himalaya are designated as some form of park or reserve by their respective governments. In the process, the centuries of protection the beyul concept has provided are being forgotten, and regulation and policing are taking precedence over communities’ faith-based conservation. Many beyul are no longer so isolated because of modern modes of transportation and communication. Education in outside languages often erodes local cultural values and traditional knowledge. When children adopt cultures that are alien to their own land, traditional concepts such as the beyul begin to lose their grip on people’s minds.

In the age of global economic systems, voluntary faith-based approaches may also not be adequate to ensure continued environmental protection, as development projects are authorized from outside the communities. Roads now run through Ronghsar and Kyirong and there are airfields near Khumbu and Khenbalung. Burning of forests, livestock overgrazing and soil erosion are becoming problems as community respect for the beyul declines. And since the higher-elevation and more isolated areas tend to be economically poorer, the money to be made from tourism and development is a powerful force. Adventure tourism like trekking is often unregulated, and increasing numbers of visitors are taking their toll on fragile areas. Recent migrants to the area often serve as commercial and trekking porters, and they do not share the religious and cultural traditions of long-term inhabitants.

Pemako is currently threatened by China’s plans to build a hydroelectric dam, twice as big as the controversial Three Gorges Dam, which would harness the power of the Tsangpo waterfalls to pump water to northeast China. The project would displace the traditional Tibetan villages above the gorge and impact millions of people downriver in India, who will be deprived of river water and the nutrients its flood levels bring into soil. The artificial lake created by the dam would also submerge untouched forests and wildlife.

Sagarmatha National Park, which encompasses Beyul Khumbu, near Mount Everest, was established in 1976 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage site three years later. It is the second most visited national park in Nepal’s Himalayan region; tourism increased from 3,600 tourists in 1979 to 21,570 in 2001. The Sherpa continue to live in the park and grow food through traditional methods. However, there are pressing concerns about the increased harvesting of fragile and slow-growing high-altitude vegetation such as shrub juniper and cushion plants, which the growing population uses for fuel. Tourism has brought them some financial benefits, but the growing numbers of people disturb fragile ecological zones, and tourism income is not equally distributed throughout the region.

For protected areas to be successful in the long term, park managers and government officials need to learn more about the spiritual underpinnings of the beyul concept in order to gain support from the local communities who are the real guardians of the hidden lands. Regulations should complement traditional use rules instead of override them. A full survey of beyul throughout the Himalayas needs to be conducted, alongside interviews with community spiritual leaders to document the principles by which they govern their beyul. Local schools should incorporate beyul traditions into their curriculum so adults can pass on indigenous knowledge and practices. Outside visitors and migrant workers should also be educated in the local culture and conservation ethics; their respect and interest will further encourage community members to preserve their heritage.

Some community groups and NGOs are currently working to strengthen local attachment to the beyul and educate communities about the value of ecotourism, which can provide income while also protecting the sacred valleys. The Mountain Institute’s Himalaya Program works with local communities in the eastern Himalayan valleys of Nepal and Tibet to preserve mountain cultures, improve mountain livelihoods and conserve ecosystems. Its Sacred Sites Trail Project has constructed a trail in Sagarmatha National Park to keep tourists away from fragile areas and direct them to lesser-known sacred sites and villages in the Khumbu region, thus spreading the economic benefits to isolated communities and lessening the impact on better-known places. The nonprofit Vision Builders runs the Lhundrüp Topgyé Ling School in the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which serves local students and Tibetan refugees by teaching literacy, Buddhist principles and cultural traditions.

Protecting ecosystems across political boundaries is also vital for long-term conservation. Toward that end, the Mountain Institute has supported the governments of Nepal, India and the Tibet Autonomous Region in creating a network of transboundary protected areas including Sagarmatha National Park, Makalu-Barun National Park and Tibet’s Qomolangma Nature Preserve. These adjacent parks jointly protect nearly 40,000 square kilometers around Mount Everest in the heart of the Himalaya, including six beyul.

 

The Yarlung Zangbo Grand Canyon

 

The Yarlung Zangbo Grand Canyon is a deep and long canyon in China. The Yarlung Tsangpo River, usually just called “Zangbo” (also spelled “Tsangpo”, meaning “purifier”), originates from Mount Kailash and running east for about 1700 km drains a northern section of the Himalayas before its enters the gorge near Pe, Tibet. The canyon has a length of about 150 miles as the gorge bends around Mount Namcha Barwa (7756 m) and cuts its way through the eastern Himalayan range. Its waters drop from 3,000 m near Pe to about 300 m at the end of the gorge. After this passage the river enters Arunachal Pradesh, India, and eventually becomes the Brahmaputra.

The gorge has a unique ecosystem with species of animals and plants barely explored and affected by human influence. Its climate ranges from subtropical to arctic. The rare takin is one of the animals hunted by the local tribes.

Since the 1990’s the Yarlung Tsangpo River has been the destination of a number of teams that engage in exploration and whitewater kayaking. The river has been called the “Everest of Rivers” because of the extreme conditions of the river. The first attempt to run was made in 1993 by a Japanese group who lost one member on the river.

In October 1998, a kayaking expedition sponsored by the National Geographic Society attempted to navigate the Tsangpo Gorge. Troubled by unanticipated high water levels, the expedition ended in tragedy when expert kayaker Doug Gordon lost his life. The largest waterfall of the river, the “Hidden Falls” of the Tsangpo Gorge, was not reached by outside explorers until 1998, by a team consisting of Ken Storm, Hamid Sarder, Ian Baker and their Monpa guides. They estimated the height of the falls to be about 108 feet. The falls, which, along with the rest of the Pemako area, are considered a sacred site by Tibetan Buddhists, had been concealed until then from outsiders, including the Chinese authorities.

In January-February, 2002, an international group consisting of Scott Lindgren, Steve Fisher, Mike Abbott, Allan Ellard, Dustin Knapp, and Johnnie and Willie Kern, completed the first descent of the upper Tsangpo gorge section.

Its beauty, remoteness, and mystique make it one of the places thought to have inspired the notion of Shangri-La in James Hilton’s book Lost Horizon in 1933.

While the government of the PRC has declared the establishment of a “Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon National Reservation”, there have also been governmental plans and feasibility studies for a major dam to harness hydroelectric power and divert water to other areas in China. The size of the dam in the Tsongpo gorge would exceed that of Three Gorges Dam as it is anticipated that such a plant would generate 40,000 megawatts electricity, more than twice the output of Three Gorges. It has been estimated that construction may start in 2009. It is feared that there will be displacement of local populations, destruction of ecosystems, and an impact for downstream people in India and Bangladesh. The project is criticized by India because of its negative impact upon the residents downstream. Analysts think that the livelihood of up to 100 million people could be at stake and therefore voice fears that the completion of the water diversion component of the project could sparkle an Indian-Chinese water war if no proper management is taking place. However, another type of dam, the inflatable, is possible that would obviate any necessity for a huge concrete structure. R.B. Cathcart, in 1999, first suggested a fabric dam—inflatable with freshwater or air—could block the Yarlung Tsangpo Caynon upstream of Namcha Barwa. Water would then be conveyed via a hardrock tunnel to a point downstream from that mountain, affording the generation of tens of thousands of megawatts—power which would have to be distributed internationally and equitably through a Himalayan power grid.

 


 


Journey to the Hidden Land of Pemako

[Source: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/08/journey-to-the-hidden-land-of-pemako/]

 

In one of the stamens of the flower of the world is Pemako in the shape of Vajra Yogini lying down. Outer, inner and secret levels correspond to the levels of the mind. In the secret chakra of Vajra Yogini there areflowers coming in winter also. If people die here, they do not take karmic rebirth; they go to the Pure Lands. I do not tell lies. It is like that.

Keep it in mind.

Guru Rinpoche from the Guidebook to Pemako

 

Pemako is the supreme hidden land, says Guru Rinpoche. Predicting the dark times when the elements will be so imbalanced that it affects meditators, he concealed 108 valleys in the Himalayas as terma or hidden treasure with guidebooks to be revealed at precisely the right time.

Pemako straddles south-east Tibet and extends into the most north-easterly corner of India. The word itself means ‘lotus display’ and is said to be the actual body of Vajra Yogini. From head to navel she is in Tibet; from the navel downwards she lives in India.

The name has resonated in my mind for many years. Stories of trees with edible bark and streams running with milky water, dogs who attain rainbow body by eating the grass, sacred treasure taken from a poisonous lake, magical herbs that induce siddhis and enable realization of emptiness, make it sound like a mythical lost paradise. But, the legend tells also of cannibalistic tribal people in loin cloths with blow darts who guard the hidden land from intruders, poisonous snakes, tigers, leeches and dense jungle.  All this makes Pemako intriguing, like a shape shifting dakini.

The renowned explorer-botanist Kingdon Ward, had a less exalted view of Pemako.

 

Not only is Pemako extraordinarily difficult to reach from any direction, it is still more difficult to penetrate and explore when reached. Surrounded on three sides by the gorges of the Tsangpo, the fourth is blocked by mighty ranges of snow mountains, whose passes are only open for a few months in the year. Beyond these immediate barriers to east, west and south are trackless forests inhabited by wild unfriendly tribes… Add to this… a climate which varies from the subtropical to the arctic, the only thing common to the whole region being perpetual rain, snakes and wild animals, giant stinging nettles and myriads of biting and blood sucking ticks, hornets, flies and leeches, and you have some idea of what the traveler has to contend with.

The Riddle of the Tsangpo Gorges, Kingdon Ward, 1926

 

Pemako was both heaven and hell. I had to experience it for myself to see my own mind, but how could I get there?

My first attempt was in 1994 when our group of three, led by the translator Gyurme Dorje,  got as far as the Guru Rinpoche cave of Thimpei directly below the Doshong-la pass where Kingdon-Ward had made his entry to Pemako in 1925.

It was full moon day as we were walking along the path to Thimpei. The dagger shaped mountain of Namchak Barwa erupted from its white shroud and instantly we saw a rainbow circling the sun.

Inside the cave a massive skylight shaped like a phurba or ritual dagger marked the place where Guru Rinpoche had subdued a demon by throwing his phurba at it. It hit the rock exposing Namcha Barwa, the phurba shaped mountain, at the point where the surging Tsangpo twists around the mountain in a hairpin bend, disappears into the gorge – three times the depth of the Grand Canyon – and after dropping 11,000 metres in an unexplored five mile stretch, emerges serenely into the Brahmaputra in Assam.

This was the heart of the mystery surrounding the inner hidden land. Was there a precipitous waterfall to account for that drop? In The Riddle of the Tsangpo Gorges, Kingdon-Ward described his failed attempt to discover the waterfall which supposedly hid the  doorway to the mystical inner level: the fabled Chhimed Yangsang Ney.

After crossing the Tsangpo, we camped on a grassy stretch of land. It was in the late afternoon as we were having tea that a village man appeared dressed in the local style. He told Gyurme Dorje, he had something for ‘the lady’. From inside his jacket he took out a dark object wrapped in a cloth and put it in my hand. It was a black oval stone with a prominent white eye marking its peaked surface and a clear line around the perimeter. ‘This is from my father’s treasure box. When he died he left it with me. I know it’s something special, but I don’t know what it is,’ he said.

As my hand clasped the pitch-black stone I could feel it pulsing as if it were alive. I knew immediately what it was but said nothing. I took out one hundred yuan, placed it in his hand, and said, ‘Please take it.’ He smiled, put it in his pocket and disappeared over a grassy slope.

It felt like a present from Guru Rinpoche. It seemed he was saying, you will get to Pemako. This stone is my promise to you. I wrapped the stone in a brocade bag and took it everywhere with me, like a talisman.

We never made it  into the hidden land on that trip.  An avalanche overtook our expedition to Milarepa’s famous tower – the last of the many impasses on that fateful trip. Only the stone, held, admired and blessed by all the high Lamas, was there to remind me of Guru Rinpoche’s promise as the years passed.

In 1996 I began to hear about the exploits of Ian Baker: Buddhist, scholar, adventurer, and mountaineer, with a Pemako obsession. Over dinner at the Vajra Hotel in Kathmandu he showed me some of his photos of the Tsangpo gorge. People were crossing ravines balancing on rusted cables! I felt utter dismay. ‘ This is Indiana Jones’, I said staring dismally at their prowess. ‘I can’t do this,’ I told him. ‘It gets worse’, he replied enthusiastically, taking out another photo of sheer rock face with a drop into endless space. ‘We had to climb that.’

In June 1996 I received a letter from Ian telling me of his hazardous explorations into the Tsangpo gorge.

this trip was arduous in the extreme involving hazardous stream crossings on rusted cables followed by two weeks of total wilderness in which we depended much on climbing ropes descending slick mosscovered cliffs and traversing across precipitous gorges. We stayed in caves which were filled with vipers until our fires drove them out and rain was almost perpetual. Nevertheless we reached our goal: the unknown reaches of the Tsangpo’s innermost gorges and discovered there a world of waterfalls and caves encrusted in crystal. This was a region prophesied by the terton Gampopa as containing magical plants that could enhance siddhis – the elusive tsa kuntuzangpo, but apart from strange varieties of psylocibin mushrooms, we found no specific plant that could be claimed to fit this category….

In 1999 Ian’s tenacious expeditions revealed at last the mysterious waterfall hidden in the Tsangpo Gorge and he rose to stardom as National Geographic explorer of the year. The Chinese retaliated by closing off Pemako to the foreign devil.

I tried every possible way to get a permit to Pemako from the Indian side. But NE Arunachal Pradesh where Pemko lay, was restricted: it was a military zone bordering China and a tribal area. For years the Indian Home Office said No, loud and clear, in spite of my entreaties that I was a Buddhist pilgrim and not a spy. I gave up.

In 2004 my karma with Pemako ripened. After the death of Shabdrung Rinpoche of Bhutan, whose companion I had been for five years, I met the manager of his travel company in Delhi. Like everyone on the Pemako trail, Basant was enthralled by the dakini. His eyes lit up when he talked about her; and even more astounding, he had explored ithe hidden land from the Arunachal side with the help of Ata, a native Pemako guide. The Indian Government now granted permits, he informed me.

My heart was beating wildly as I told him I had to go. In 2006 he arranged an itinerary to Devakota Mountain, the heart of the lotus flower, and in March 2007, we left Delhi – three women and a crew of fifteen. We were lured into the jungle by a description in Basant’s brochure from the Guru Rinpoche Guidebook to Pemako:

Devakotta mountain is the clear-light realm of dakinis and deities of the Mother Tantra, …It is the dwelling place of Chakrasamvara with his 725 accompanying deities….Those of fortune who merely come to this place will experience spontaneous realization. By practising meditation here one can in this lifetime attain perfect Buddhahood, or upon reaching the bardo state can attain the Sambhoghaya, the Enjoyment Body of complete enlightenment. For whoever makes one complete circumambulation of Devakotta Mountain the door to all lower rebirths will be closed.. A single outer circumambulation of this holy place will bring ten million siddhis while making thirteen circumambulations in one day will lead one direct to the transcendent state, beyond distinction of virtue and non-virtue. All explained herein is the infallible truth.

Devakota Mountain sounded worth a visit.

Four hours from Delhi we stepped off the plane in Assam, at Dibrugarh. The following day we crossed the Brahmaputra in yellow and red painted riverboats barely large enough to hold two land cruisers and thirty people. After three eight- hour days of twisting around mountains, we came to the end of the road.

On the full moon day we arrived at Tuting, a Tibetan village, where we abandoned our land cruisers for the trek into dense jungle. Ata, whom we had picked up en route, seemed a direct descendent of Guru Rinpoche with a quirky touch of the Wizard of Oz. The way his moustache curled upwards in a cheeky point, like the Guru and the frequent intensity of his wide-eyed gaze – were surely family traits.  Gold wellies, a rainbow umbrella and a long pointed walking stick  used to spear stray bits of litter, completed the ensemble.


Ekajati Mountain with cloud shaped dakini

 

He pointed to the first landmark: Ekajati Mountain. Mary, Margaret and I gazed mutely at the formation above it: a white cloud shaped like a dancing dakini.

A halo of rainbow lights encircling the full moon lit the pathway to a half hidden wooden hall where a Nyingma feast ritual was in full swing.

 

Full moon with rainbow in Pemako

 

Through the dimly lit room we could see women pouring liquid into cups and heaping steaming food onto plates. Like wanderers in a foreign land coming upon a fairy feast, we stood for a moment absorbed in the buzz of happiness. I was used to seeing monks in maroon robes performing these rituals, but here was a family. Men and women served and practised the rituals equally as lay practitioners. We were seated and served the feast offering: swollen succulent mushrooms like fairies’ bonnets, the juicy green tips of ferns, glasses of chang tasting of sweet nectar followed by whisky with a potent medicinal blessing, so strong you could smell the herbs. The smoke offering was made from local juniper and filled the air with a pungent aroma. It felt like the quintessence of all smells, tastes, sounds, shapes was here and we were absorbing them.

‘’Your arrival on this full moon night is auspicious’ said the Lama.

‘It’s taken me a long time to get here,’ I replied moving closer to show him my stone. I told him where I’d received it.

‘That is the most powerful cave of Guru Rinpoche’, he said. ‘Everything that comes from there is connected with him. This is a very special stone.’

Had he ever heard of a terton called Pegya Lingpa who took treasure from a poisonous lake? He nodded forcefully. ‘Of course, we all remember that,’ He retold the story. ‘On top of a mountain there was a lake surrounded by thick forests, where no one dared to go. Pegya Lingpa made some prayers; took off his clothes and ran up the mountain with all the people following him. After submerging in the lake, he appeared carrying a round, black fruit-like substance never seen in that area. The naga of the lake was very powerful and all the poison went into his body turning it black. He washed himself with milk and water and made an offering to the naga.’

I knew now why it had taken me so long to get to Pemako: my connection was with the Indian side.


First suspension bridge across the Siang

 

When the first suspension bridge came into view my body stiffened. Anchored to a massive boulder, it stretched hundreds of feet across a chasm. ‘There are five suspension bridges’, said Basant. ‘ This is the best – and longest, that we’ll have.The last one to Devakota,’ he shrugged his shoulders to dismiss concern, ‘we don’t know yet what condition that’s in.’

As we negotiated every footstep on the swaying bridge, the mind became one pointed and still. Distraction was dangerous. We walked for several hours on a narrow stone path balancing on logs over sudden steep drops until we came to a tribal village.

 

Ata with tribal leader

 

Inside the community hall, were the tribal elders in loin-cloths downing home-made brew with abandon. They sat us down and filled our glasses while Ata narrated the opening of Pemako.

It was predicted, that the reincarnation of Achar Saley (one of the twenty five disciples of Guru Rinpoche in the 8th century) would reveal the hidden land. Accordingly, Terton Ngang Gey came to Pemako one hundred and fifty years ago.  The tribesmen tried to halt his progress.  Now partly civilized by Christian missionaries, at that time they were wild naked cannibals killing randomly for food. Terton Ngang Gey got angry. As he shook his long hair, sparks of fire came out setting the houses alight until the whole village began to burn. Recognising his powers, the Tibetan settlers prostrated to him, with the Adis following their example. They agreed to let him enter  Pemako if he would stop the fire. Since that time the Adis have co-operated to help any Buddhist traveling in their area.

As we walked up and down following the trail into jungle where tree ferns towered to the height of cedars, we passed some of the other tribal inhabitants, the Mishmis. Their costumes resembled medieval doublets, with peaked hats, and they carried blow guns. In silent amazement we gazed in wonder like time travelers caught in a curved loop. Ata seized a banana leaf from a Mishmi unfurling it to reveal a cluster of frogs skewered up like a kebab.

‘They kill everything,’ he said sadly. His own white t-shirt was splattered with drops of blood from leeches, left to feed on his body. He could remember when the leeches were so numerous, blood from his body would flow like water.

In the Guru Rinpoche Guidebook which Ata read aloud every evening like a bedtime story, the topography of Pemako is described as many cows’ horns pointing steeply upwards. We sat down to rest before the 900 metre descent to our camp site at the Yangsang River trying to confirm the literal truth of the Guidebook: the birds sing dharma words and the water sounds like the chanting of mantra.

While we were listening carefully to distinguish the sound of a particular mantra, Ata burst into the Guru Rinpoche chant in tune with the birds. Our laughter hung in the air with birdsong blending with the sound of wind, water, birds, trees, insects.

Absorbed in this natural state of non-meditation. I started to chat with Guru Rinpoche, as if he were right there, complimenting him on Pemako. ‘So this is what you did. You made a place that shows the natural state, as it is. Now I understand.’

Halfway along the trail, we arrived at a stupa enclosing an impressive image of Guru Rinpoche’s face with bulging eyes staring into boundary-less space – and entered the inner hidden land.

Now we were inside a Buddhist world of prayer flags, moss covered stupas, technicolour boulders and the occasional Tibetan village of primitive wooden houses inhabited by meditators absorbed in contemplation – aided, it seemed, by very potent chang.

The jungle blend: chrome yellow and orange banana flowers, massive tree ferns, small ferns with curling spring green tips, mushrooms spiralling into umbrellas, grasses and plants that could colour the skin like rouge.

 

Tropical jungle undergrowth

 

Ata used his stick like a wand to douse the general area, then scratched into the ground and came up exultantly with an almond like nut. ‘This is very special. It’s called khandro drunbu. It’s the dakini’s protection.’ We all scratched into the ground near the spot Ata had located. Triumphant, we all found at least one. The dakinis were with us.

‘Some grass here is so powerful, said Ata, if you taste it you can fly. A goat ate so many different kinds of herbs, it went into meditation and when it died it produced ringsel.’

It is said five types of supreme magical herbs grow in Pemako making it an apothecary’s paradise of mind expanding, bliss bestowing elixirs.

From Khamtrul Rinpoche’s visionary Guidebook to Pemako:

The magical herb that increases happiness is white in color and tinged with red. Its flowering bud is five in number and smells akin to medicinal elephant bile. Its petals are small and shaped like the curled hand of a small infant baby.

The magical herb which actualizes immortality is a red lotus flower tinged with black. Smelling it, releases the scent of camphor, which is carried by the wind. Its eight petals are shaped like wings taking flight in the sky. Its leaves are orange in color and shaped like the webbed hands of a frog.

The magical herb which grants all supreme and mundane siddhis, is a golden flower tinged with red. Smelling it reveals an odor of nutmeg and the tips of its six petals are slightly curled. It has blue leaves which hang downwards like silk tassels.

The magical herb which empowers one to fly in the sky like the Dakini, Vajra Varahi, is a blossoming red flower like red coral that has been polished with oil. Smelling it reveals the aroma of aloe wood and the pungent taste of cumin. It has three petals and is shaped like a Garuda soaring in the heavens as its leaves are formed like a peacock with a breast of lapis lazuli.

The magical herb which is the summation of all intrinsic realization is a blue flower shaped like a bell. A single whiff will intoxicate the mind with its scent of white sandalwood, its petals are circular in circumference with its anthers shaped like bulbous and shiny seeds the shape of a Vajra. It has green leaves like the feathers on the crown of a light green rooster.

This describes the five types of supreme magical herbs as found in the Beyul Pema-kö. The definitive means for recognizing them is during the day they display a shower of rainbow light and at night, they burn like fire and jiggle and wiggle with dancing light. These herbs contain magical power, are sacred to this holy land and are extremely difficult to find.

On the morning of the third day we reached Devakota mountain, an island sitting in the bow of the Yangsang River which flowed anticlockwise around it, imitating on an outer level the visualization of a mantra circle in the secret place of Vajra Yogini. After a quick dip in the fast flowing cold waters, we had to cross the most challenging of suspension bridges.

 

Bridge to Devakota

 

Every step over the frail wooden slats had to be focused and fully present; a last triumphant step onto land at Devakota and we began the middle korra of the mountain. A treacherous path with sudden narrow passages opening into empty space, and massive tree roots lying in wait to sabotage careless steps, again composed the mind to meditative absorption.

In the second cave, more hidden from view, and narrower, Ata came back with some red earth which he daubed on our foreheads. ‘This is Yeshe Tsogyal’s cave’, he explained ‘and this is her cindura.’ We scrambled onwards and came to the third cave, a very open, spacious rock overhang, like a living room window with inviting views of the tree cliffs dropping towards the river. Ata introduced us to ‘the real Maratika’ where Guru Rinpoche and his consort Mandarava attained the siddhi of immortality.

 

Norma and Ata completing kora of Devakota

 

We sat and meditated, listening till all sounds blended with the nature of mind. Hours passed before we slowly came to our feet and walked the stone stairs to the top of Devakota. A clearing showed a modest stone temple – built by Terton Nang Gey then damaged in 1950 in a massive earthquake and rebuilt – a wooden shack for pilgrims’ retreats, another larger primitive wooden dwelling for guests and a jubilant band of proud cockerels who had been saved from the chop. A Lama with a white wispy beard and long gown, crinkled his face in ageless joy as he showed us to our beds in the guesthouse. He could have played the deathless Lama in Lost Horizon.

I walked to the temple to examine a pitch-black stone throne standing magnificently beside it. ‘This is the most important terma treasure of Pemako,’ said Ata. ‘It’s the stone throne of Guru Rinpoche. When Dudjom Rinpoche gave the Rinchen Terdzo here at the age of sixteen, not even he sat on the throne. Inside that throne there are more treasures than in the rest of the world.’

I circled the temple three times, magnetised by the throne.

‘The cockerels welcomed us in the dawn light with a boisterous cockadoodling, like an entire orchestra with percussion, wind instruments and lead singer belting his heart out. I meditated for an hour, then circled the temple, clutching my black stone in its red brocade bag. I found myself crawling involuntarily up the stairs and touching my small stone to the massive throne. It started to vibrate as though charging up, until my hand was tingling. A surge of gratitude filled my heart. ‘Thank you Guru Rinpoche for  bringing the stone back home’.

The secret place of Vajra Yogini was not revealed until the return journey. Before reaching Tutung, we walked steeply downhill off the path until eventually we came to a clearing in a thickly forested area. It was like cutting through a veil and entering another dimension. Prayer flags festooned a gigantic rock shaped like a stone-age bird with heavy wings folded by its side.

 

Garuda rock at the Vajrakilaya secret place of Vajra Yogini

 

Ata introduced us to the Garuda rock explaining that the Garuda was the protector of the deity Vajrakilaya who resided in the secret place of Vajra Yogini. It had weathered into the landscape like a prehistoric creature, covered in moss with knobbed bones beneath.

I asked Ata about the secret doorway to the inner hidden land that was supposed to lie behind the waterfalls in the depths of the Tsangpo Gorge. ‘This place here is called Chhimey Yangsam Chu’, said Ata emphatically. ‘This means the immortal most secret place of the dharma.’

The location of the secret gateway to Pemako, I concluded, could not be a fixed geographical point. It could only be known at a deeper level of mind. We saw its auspicious signs, tasted its plants, touched its soil, heard its sounds, smelled its fragrance and sat in stillness within its body.

Penetrate the depths of Pemako? One of our porters who used to be a hunter, told us a story. At Pema Shri he looked out over the valley and saw lots of small lights like a big village. The other hunters with him also saw the same phenomenon. Then, to their amazement, the lights disappeared. On many occasions, rainbows encircled him.

Pemako is a dakini manifesting appearance and emptiness to remind us of what reality truly is.

Weather Report: March 2007

No leeches, perpetual rain or mosquitoes

No stinging nettles, venomous bugs or poisonous snakes

Occasional scattered showers

With outbreaks of gentle sunshine throughout

Unusual rainbows at night circling the moon

And auspicious cloud formations 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Please support us so that we can continue to bring you more Dharma:

If you are in the United States, please note that your offerings and contributions are tax deductible. ~ the tsemrinpoche.com blog team

26 Responses to Pemako – Vajrayogini’s Sacred Body

DISCLAIMER IN RELATION TO COMMENTS OR POSTS GIVEN BY THIRD PARTIES BELOW

Kindly note that the comments or posts given by third parties in the comment section below do not represent the views of the owner and/or host of this Blog, save for responses specifically given by the owner and/or host. All other comments or posts or any other opinions, discussions or views given below under the comment section do not represent our views and should not be regarded as such. We reserve the right to remove any comments/views which we may find offensive but due to the volume of such comments, the non removal and/or non detection of any such comments/views does not mean that we condone the same.

We do hope that the participants of any comments, posts, opinions, discussions or views below will act responsibly and do not engage nor make any statements which are defamatory in nature or which may incite and contempt or ridicule of any party, individual or their beliefs or to contravene any laws.

  1. Samfoonheei on Oct 31, 2019 at 12:26 pm

    Pemako is one of the hidden lands, or beyuls, blessed by the 8th century Buddhist master Padmasambhava as places of refuge. Ancient Tibetan texts describe it is the most extraordinary place of the world, the most sought-after, mysterious of all the hidden lands, shaped in the form of a lotus. Well, is considered the supreme hidden valley and the most sacred place blessed with holy virtues. Looking at those pictures tells all , how beautiful it is . With tropical jungle undergrowth, uncivilized surroundings, flowers of varies species, meditation caves and so forth. Each of it tell us story behind it. Interesting read .
    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing such a wonderful place hidden in the mountains.

  2. Pastor Niral Patel on Oct 28, 2018 at 1:38 am

    A sacred image of the rare form of Vajrayogini known as Ucheyma, the Buddha that shows us the path to eradicate the ego. For this and many other high-resolution images of the enlightened beings to download for free visit: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU

    digitalucheyma-s

  3. Valentina Suhendra on Oct 26, 2018 at 11:49 am

    Ucheyma (Severed Headed Vajrayogini) (Main figure)

    (Top to bottom): H.H. the 7th Panchen Lama, Ucheyma (Severed Headed Vajrayogini), Vajra Varnani (green assistant), Vajra Vairocani (yellow assistant), Dorje Shugden and Citipati.

    The central deity is known as Chinnamasta or Dorje Neljorma Ucheyma. Both Chinnamasta (Sanskrit) and Ucheyma (Tibetan) literally mean, ‘She Whose Head is Severed’. The meaning behind her form is to show practitioners that they need to completely remove the grasping and self-identification with the “I” or the ego. Generally, the identity of the self is strongly associated with our face more than any other part of our body. We usually recognise a person when we look at a person’s face. Hence, our self-identification or ego is strongly associated with our face. To show us that this self-identification needs to be overcome on the spiritual path to enlightenment, Vajrayogini uses her ritual chopper to decapitate herself. This is symbolic of her practice eradicating the ego.

    The Severed Headed Vajrayogini, as she is also known, removes all afflictive mental constructs by removing the root cause – the identification of the self, the ego. We are either attached to or averse to people and circumstances because we have an ego to please, gratify and protect. But in the grander scheme of things, this self-identification with the ‘I’ is illusory and does not really exist. Therefore, Vajrayogini reveals this ultimate truth through the dramatic decapitation of her head and at the same time is still able to live and function. She is able to live due to her direct perception of emptiness and egolessness.

    Contrary to what some people might think, the eradication of the self does not destroy individualism, our personality or make us into a mindless person. In fact, the eradication of the ego makes us become a vibrant and compassionate person, someone that has greater awareness of the suffering of others. In other words, we become much warmer, kinder, forgiving, tolerant, conscientious, generous, contemplative and we are become a joy to be with. The cutting of the ego or the ‘I’ brings us towards awakening our true self, the Buddha nature within.

    The Severed Headed Vajrayogini has two dakini attendants. From the trunk of her neck, there are three severed blood vessels spurting three jets of blood that flow into the mouths of her own decapitated head that she carries in her left hand and into the mouths of her two attendants. Tsem Rinpoche explained that the three jets of blood represent that her practice purifies the three psychic poisons of ignorance, hatred and desire. In turn, this leads to the attainment of the three bodies of a Buddha – the emanation body, the enjoyment body and the truth body. In other words, the severance of the ego via her tantric path leads to the purification of all delusions and ultimately, the attainment of Buddhahood itself.

    The 7th Panchen Lama, Palden Tenpai Nyima is featured floating above because of his compilation of sadhanas from the ancient Sadhanamala texts. This includes a particular sadhana or collection of prayers, visualisation and mantra focused on Ucheyma. Incidentally, Dorje Shugden in many of his previous lives was a lineage master of the Vajrayogini tantras as well. These previous lives include the likes of the Mahasiddha Naropa and Tsarchen Losel Gyatso. The Lord and Lady of the Charnel Ground, known as Citipati, are one of the main protectors of the Vajrayogini Tantra.

    Last of all, the ascetic meditator engaging in his devotional practices towards Ucheyma in the cemetery represents the ideal environment for tantric practice because such environments invoke deep renunciation towards worldly affairs and attachments. All Buddhist traditions advocate meditating on the bones of the deceased because it reminds us of our mortality and hence, we develop revulsion towards the transient nature of worldly or ordinary existence.

    More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU

    Read more about Vajrayogini: https://bit.ly/2iVLCuG

  4. Joy on Oct 26, 2018 at 5:59 am

    Ucheyma (Severed Headed Vajrayogini) (Main figure)

    (Top to bottom): Maitri Kacho (Flying Vajrayogini), Maitri Kacho (One-Leg Up Vajrayogini), Naro Kacho, Sukhasiddhi, Ucheyma (Severed Headed Vajrayogini), Vajra Varnani (green assistant), Vajra Vairocani (yellow assistant), Citipati, Vajravarahi and Dorje Shugden.

    The central deity is known as Severed Headed Vajrayogini, Chinnamasta or Dorje Neljorma Ucheyma. Both Chinnamasta (Sanskrit) and Ucheyma (Tibetan) literally mean, ‘She Whose Head is Severed’. The meaning behind her form is to show practitioners that they need to completely remove the grasping and self-identification with the “I” or the ego. Generally, the identity of the self is strongly associated with our face more than any other part of our body. We usually recognise a person when we look at a person’s face. Hence, our self-identification or ego is strongly associated with our face. To show us that this self-identification needs to be overcome on the spiritual path to enlightenment, Vajrayogini uses her ritual chopper to decapitate herself. This is symbolic of her practice eradicating the ego.

    The Severed Headed Vajrayogini removes all afflictive mental constructs by removing the root cause – the identification of the self, the ego. We are either attached to or averse to people and circumstances because we have an ego to please, gratify and protect. But in the grander scheme of things, this self-identification with the ‘I’ is illusory and does not really exist. Therefore, Vajrayogini reveals this ultimate truth through the dramatic decapitation of her head and at the same time is still able to live and function. She is able to live due to her direct perception of emptiness and egolessness.

    Contrary to what some people might think, the eradication of the self does not destroy individualism, our personality or make us into a mindless person. In fact, the eradication of the ego makes us become a vibrant and compassionate person, someone that has greater awareness of the suffering of others. In other words, we become much warmer, kinder, forgiving, tolerant, conscientious, generous, contemplative and we are become a joy to be with. The cutting of the ego or the ‘I’ brings us towards awakening our true self, the Buddha nature within.

    The Severed Headed Vajrayogini has two dakini attendants. From the trunk of her neck, there are three severed blood vessels spurting three jets of blood that flow into the mouths of her own decapitated head that she carries in her left hand and into the mouths of her two attendants. Tsem Rinpoche explained that the three jets of blood represent that her practice purifies the three psychic poisons of ignorance, hatred and desire. In turn, this leads to the attainment of the three bodies of a Buddha – the emanation body, the enjoyment body and the truth body. In other words, the severance of the ego via her tantric path leads to the purification of all delusions and ultimately, the attainment of Buddhahood itself.

    Severed Headed Vajrayogini is surrounded by some of her other forms, including Naro Kacho, two forms of Maitri Kacho, Sukhasiddhi and Vajravarahi. These forms of Vajrayogini are more commonly practised compared to Severed Headed Vajrayogini and are prevalent in most Tibetan Buddhist lineages. Though they may look different, all forms are indivisible from her true nature and all her practices can lead practitioners to enlightenment. Naro Kacho arose from a vision beheld by the Mahasiddha Naropa, Maitri Kacho from a vision beheld by Maitripa, and Indra Kacho from a vision beheld by Indrabodhi. The Lord and Lady of the Charnel Ground, known as Citipati, are one of the main protectors of the Vajrayogini Tantra.

    Last of all, Dorje Shugden is a protector with special affinity with Vajrayogini practitioners because he arose from an incarnation lineage that includes Naropa and Tsarchen Losel Gyatso who practised and proliferated her Tantra.

    More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU

    Read more about Vajrayogini: https://bit.ly/2iVLCuG

  5. Pastor Adeline on Oct 26, 2018 at 1:13 am

    Vajrayogini (Main figure)

    (Top to bottom): Naropa, Vajradharma, Hero Vajradharma, Naro Kacho, Maitri Kacho (Flying Vajrayogini), Dorje Shugden and Vajravarahi.

    Vajrayogini is a female tantric Buddha and she has many forms that are derived from various lineages. She mainly embodies the fully enlightened female (shakti) aspect of a Buddha. She belongs to the Mother Tantra classification, which refers to her practice concentrating on the wisdom aspect of the path to Buddhahood. She is also the principal dakini, the compassionate female guides and nurturers of tantric meditation who lead practitioners to enlightenment. In the thangka, the main figure in the middle is Naro Kechari as she arose from the pure vision of the Mahasiddha Naropa.

    In Anuttara (Highest) Yoga Tantra, principal dakinis normally appear in union with a male consort and this can be seen in the cases of deities such as Guhyasamaja, Hevajra, and Kalachakra. In the case of Vajrayogini, she is the principal female Buddha of the Chakrasamvara Tantra and therefore, she is normally in union with Heruka Chakrasamvara. Furthermore, Vajrayogini is also considered a Vajradakini, who are yidams or meditational deities in their own right. Their practices have evolved from the main practices of their consorts, simplifying the otherwise complicated original practice by reducing it to a single-deity meditation without sacrificing the main benefits and features of the original. Hence, Vajradakini practices such as Vajrayogini and Nairatmya are derived from the original Chakrasamvara Tantra and Hevajra Tantra respectively.

    In essence, Vajrayogini is known as “Sarvabuddha-dakini” or the Dakini Who is the Essence of all Buddhas. Her mantra is known as the King of All Mantras as it has the most powerful ability to bless us with spiritual attainments even without any visualisation or meditation. There are 11 Yogas in the generation stage of her practice and a few which have the power of transforming ordinary actions like sleeping, waking and ordinary daily tasks into a collection of merits. Ultimately, her Tantra offers salvation for ordinary practitioners at death with her special promise of guiding practitioners towards Kechara, or the Paradise of the Dakinis, in which we can continue deep practices to become a Buddha without fear, obstacles and interruptions.

    Within Vajrayogini practice, soliciting the blessings of the lama and the lineage master are of paramount importance in order for our practice to bear results. Hence, the lama is visualised as the red Vajradharma with arms crossed at the heart, holding the vajra and bell. The lineage masters are visualised as Hero Vajradharma, holding a damaru and skullcup while cradling a khatvanga. Aside from the main Naro Kechari form, Vajrayogini also appears in the form of Maitri Kechari, who is known as Flying Vajrayogini, and arose from the vision of Maitripa. Another common form is known as Indra Kechari, or Vajravarahi, who arose from the vision of Indrabodhi.

    Last of all, Dorje Shugden is a Dharma protector with a special affinity with Vajrayogini practitioners. This is because he himself arose from an incarnation lineage that includes the likes of Naropa, the progenitor of Naro Kechari practice, and Tsarchen Losel Gyatso who had practised and proliferated her Tantra and is listed as one the lineage masters invoked upon every day by Vajrayogini practitioners.

    More free downloads: https://bit.ly/2oxb4qU

    Read more about Vajrayogini: https://bit.ly/2iVLCuG

  6. Jacinta on Oct 8, 2018 at 3:46 pm

    As I was searching for “Kadroma Metsik Nakmo or Dakini Ucchusma who purifies and heals the body.” , this link popped up and I thought maybe I should read it. ( Rinpoche has shared this Dakini a few times and I thought perhaps Rinpoche wanna us to know more about this Dakini? Not much info for this Dakini though or maybe I haven’t tried harder. I hope Rinpoche will blog about this😁)

    This article gave me a feeling of sacredness and mystical about Pemako. The last story led me into the mystical land with excitements and curiousity. The accounts about the magical flowers described in details by a Lama, the “legend “ narrated by the leader Atta, and etc really made me wanting to know and learn more. Something like Shambala and perhaps it’s Shambala? Also if you happened to watch “Moana”, an animation show~ it’s very much similar to it. Something so scared about it and we need to preserve it. Although we can put the blame on human’s greed for wanting to explore and exploit it by building a dam, shouldn’t we blame ourselves as well? Because , I’m sure after reading this I believe anyone of us would like to go there in person to have a look too! What a greed too. 😆

    How I wish I can astral travel and hence won’t be disturbing the nature and at the same time can explore the place on my own! Alas, what a dream!

  7. Pastor Shin Tan on Oct 4, 2018 at 4:31 pm

    Original illustration and text posted by Eric D Hatchell as a reply to H.E. Tsem Tulku Rinpoche’s facebook post on Vajrayogini here: http://bit.ly/VYogini0001

    The Dākiṇī with the Essence of all Buddhas, Vajrayoginī

    Her practice includes methods to end the otherwise repetitive states of Bardo and rebirth, by transforming the process into a journey, which may lead to full enlightenment. In preparation for which, Vajrayoginī further offers the omnipresent ability to reconstruct the nature of the most, mundane everyday experiences, such that they may reveal higher destinations, via the spiritual paths she may choose to reveal. [1] Vajrayoginī being defined as, “The Dākiṇī who is the Essence of all Buddhas”, [2] is amplified by scholar Miranda Shaw when she implied that this deity is no less than, the supreme nature of the very Tantric pantheon. No male Buddha, including her divine consort, Heruka-Cakrasaṃvara, further advances her in metaphysical implications. [3]

    Vajrayoginī’s sādhanā originates from India circa 10/12th C, [4] when summoned as Heruka-Cakrasaṃvara’s Yab-Yum consort [5], with later forms including Vajrayoginī as “Solitary Hero”, she may be visualized with the deep red complexion of a 16-year-old female, whose stance is nude amidst a blazing fire of pristine awareness and most exalted wisdom. Her head is adorned with a crown of five skulls and upon her forehead, the third eye of wisdom is set vertically (represented here by an auspicious jewel). She drapes a necklace of fifty dried human skulls and is depicted with her traditional vajra-handled knife in her right hand; with a blood filled kapala in her left, she drinks with upturned head while looking above, toward the pure realm of Khechara. This seemingly gruesome gesture is actually symbolic of her clear light in great joy, known as “mahasukha” (the great bliss), [6] [7] thus the blood she drinks may be offered to us all as if a fine wine.

    Resting on the left shoulder is a Katvanga staff as she stands tall with her two feet, trampling the bodies of red Kalaratri and black Bhairava (with heads bending backward), representing the embodiment of illusion and ego-awareness. The composition, all of which rests above a sun disc and multicolored lotus pedestal, she is rendered here after a thankga of Naropa Tradition (passed down from a special teaching of the Indian Mahasiddha Naropa). Vajrayoginī herself may be classified as the personification of “Wisdom” or “Mother” and her practice originates with the Chakrasamvara Cycle of Tantras, which is one of the five principal tantric practices of the Sakya School, although found in one form or another, she is included in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism. [8]

    Vajrayoginī also appears in versions from the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism, with one popular system having the practitioner visualize themselves as Vajrayoginī, as such, their guru taking the form of Milarepa. [9] Thus depicted above the central deity here we see Milarepa on our right, with his great Guru Marpa left (whose guru was Naropa himself, and other great Indian masters). [10]

    Vajrayoginī is a simplified, single most form of the female Buddha, who is otherwise a collection of alternate forms. From her sādhanās she is visualized in English terms as “Vajra Sow”, “Wrathful Lady”, “Fierce Black One”, and other such similar manifestations of female energy found in numerous iconographic renderings and traditions. Each feature of Vajrayoginī’s visualization conveys important spiritual concept. For example, her three eyes indicate her ability to see all (past, present and future); her red-colored body symbolizes the blazing of her ”inner fire”, and the curved knife she wields, demonstrates the power to sever the delusions and obstacles of her followers and of all living beings. [11]

    —–

    Wordmarque Design and Photography

    —–

    References:

    [1] Gyatso, Kelsang. Guide to Dakini Land: The Highest Yoga Tantra Practice of Buddha Vajrayogini. London: Tharpa, 1996, p.xii.

    [2] “The Berzin Archives.” Bonding Practices for Mother Tantra. Accessed February 18, 2016. http://www.berzinarchives.com/…/bonding_prac_mother_tantra_….

    [3] Shaw, Miranda Eberle. Buddhist Goddesses of India. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 8.

    [4] English, Elizabeth. Vajrayoginī: Her Visualizations, Rituals & Forms: A Study of the Cult of Vajrayoginī in India. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2002.

    [5] “Vajrasattva (Buddhist Deity) – White (with Consort).” Vajrasattva (Buddhist Deity). Accessed February 18, 2016. http://www.himalayanart.org/items/77598.

    [6] Gyatso, Kelsang. Guide to Dakini Land: The Highest Yoga Tantra Practice of Buddha Vajrayogini. London: Tharpa, 1996 p. 123-127.

    [7] Glenn H. Mullin

    [8] “Item: Vajrayogini (Buddhist Deity) – (Naropa Tradition).” Vajrayogini (Buddhist Deity). Accessed February 18, 2016. http://www.himalayanart.org/items/290.

    [9] English, Elizabeth. Vajrayoginī: Her Visualizations, Rituals & Forms: A Study of the Cult of Vajrayoginī in India. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2002, p. xxiii.

    [10] Drinking the Mountain Stream: Songs of Tibet’s Beloved Saint, Milarepa … by Mi-la-ras-pa, Rinpoche Lama Kunga, Brian Cutillo, p.305.

    [11] Gyatso, Kelsang. Guide to Dakini Land: The Highest Yoga Tantra Practice of Buddha Vajrayogini. London: Tharpa, 1996, p.123-127.

    VY

  8. Pastor Shin Tan on Jul 25, 2018 at 2:40 am

    The current form of Naro Kacho Vajra Yogini appeared to the Indian Mahasiddha Naropa after he meditated intensely on her practice inside a cave. He beheld her glorious form in a vision. This unique form became known as Naropa’s Vajra Yogini or Naro Kacho, as it had never existed before. Later, in Tibet, His Holiness Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche also had visions of Vajra Yogini. His vision differed slightly from the vision of her that Naropa beheld. In the original Naro Kacho form, Vajra Yogini looks towards her pure land named Kechara. However in Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche’s vision, she looked straight at him, symbolic of the deity empowering him to bestow her practice to many people in order to benefit them. The practice of Vajra Yogini belongs to the Highest Yoga Tantra classification that leads to tremendous inner transformation and can even grant enlightenment within just one lifetime.

    PabongkaRinpocheVY

  9. Pastor Shin Tan on Jul 22, 2018 at 11:47 pm

    Video of Tsem Rinpoche’s shrine taken July 16, 2018. Very beautiful, well done and meticulous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPAfpMoN2bA

  10. Pastor Shin Tan on Jul 21, 2018 at 4:55 pm

    Video of Tsem Rinpoche’s shrine taken July 16, 2018.
    Very beautiful, well done and meticulous.

    https://video.tsemtulku.com/chat-videos/chat-1531752637.mp4


  11. Joy Kam on Jul 7, 2018 at 3:02 pm

    Vajra Yogini has many different forms and in each of these forms, the positioning of her sacred body, the various implements she holds and the expressions on her face have profound meaning into various aspects of enlightenment. The implements she holds, the expressions on her face, and her body symbolise specific aspects of enlightenment that suit people during a particular time and place according to their karma. So, therefore, Vajra Yogini’s pose, forms and emanations change over time in order to suit different karmically-connected practitioners. It will keep changing because enlightenment is fluid, compassionate and skilful. To gaze upon Vajra Yogini is to look at a complete ‘roadmap’ to enlightenment as every aspect of her body is a manifestation of enlightenment. Therefore to have her form, picture, painting or statue is very blessed. We should make offerings to her daily diligently.

    After the great Mahasiddha Naropa had served his guru the Mahasiddha Tilopa for 12 years, Tilopa conferred the Vajra Varahi (another form of Vajra Yogini) initiation with full instructions unto Naropa. Then, Naropa diligently meditated on Vajra Varahi and had a vision of her, and when she appeared to him directly, she appeared in the form of Vajra Yogini. Normally, when he engaged in the Vajra Yogini (Vajravarahi) practice, she was in the form of facing him directly, holding a skull cup and a curved flaying knife in front of her heart. One leg was up and one leg was down as in a dancing pose. That was the form of Vajra Yogini that he had meditated on to gain the highest attainments.

    After he had meditated on Vajra Varahi and gained visions of her, she appeared to him in a different form, with her face looking up at Kechara Paradise instead of facing him directly. Her left hand holding the skullcup was thrust in the air and her right hand holding the curved flaying knife, also known as a cemetery knife was facing down at sentient beings or samsara to help beings cut their bonds to suffering. Her left leg was bent, and her right extended while standing in a pose of looking towards Kechara Paradise like she is about to take off there. This form signifies she will take you there and out of suffering. That form of Vajra Yogini became special and that was called Naro Kacho or the Vajra Yogini of Naropa. This Naropa’s Vajra Yogini was initiated to the Nepalese Pamtingpa brothers and they meditated diligently and this tradition of Naropa’s Vajra Yogini just became prevalent and took off from there. Naropa started initiating his other disciples as well into this special form of Vajra Yogini and she became known as Naropa’s Vajra Yogini till this day and it is considered a highly blessed lineage. That is the lineage we have now and most prevalent.

    She is looking up because this Naropa’s Vajra Yogini is indicating she will lead her practitioners to her Kechara Paradise within one lifetime if you are diligent in her practice. Realizing enlightenment is harder for people in today’s world and needs more time during Kaliyuga degenerate period, she leads you to her paradise where you can practice undisturbed to Buddha-hood.

    In this brilliant artwork, what you see is the Mahasiddha Naropa having a direct vision of Vajra Yogini. It’s the first time she has appeared to Naropa in this form. This form is associated with Naropa. Prior to Naropa, this form of Vajra Yogini did not exist. She in this vision is initiating him into this form (Naro Kacho) of herself indicating this form will be most efficacious now according to our karmic period. In the background, you will see a cave with a light in it because when Naropa used to meditate in that cave, it is said that from his body would emit a light and people could see it from afar. You can also see animals surrounding Vajra Yogini, they can feel her compassion and her great blessings and they are at peace around her.

    Vajra Yogini brings peace, love, compassion, wisdom and freedom to everyone who practices her incredibly powerful tantra. Therefore, this artwork is a very beautiful representation of the time when Naropa had a vision of Vajra Yogini in this form for the first time and it is now known as Naropa’s Vajra Yogini. This artwork was offered to me as a gift from a very talented artist. I deeply appreciate this piece of visual spirituality very much.

    Tsem Rinpoche

    To download for your shrine, please click here: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=62528

  12. Valentina Suhendra on May 4, 2017 at 8:42 am

    From Tsem Rinpoche: Every person who has Maha-anuttaratantra empowerments (Eg. Heruka, Guhyasamaja, Yamantaka, Vajra Yogini, Chittamani-Tara, Kalacakra, Hevajra, Gyalwa Gyatso Chenresig, etc) should keep a copy of this on their shrine or prayer book. These are all the ritual items tantric practitioner must keep by commitment. If it is in picture form, it is alright also.

    To post

  13. Edwin Tan on Jun 17, 2013 at 6:53 pm

    Dear Rinpoche,

    Pemako really sounds like a paradise out of this world. the recount of the place by one of the explorers was so detailed.

    I really want to go there this lifetime if I can, and wouldn’t mind dying there.

    Thank you.

  14. Joy on Jun 2, 2013 at 2:55 am

    What an amazingly mystical land this is… Pemako sounds like Kechara Paradise on earth. If we have the merits we’d be able to see it and go to it…. we’d be so blessed! Imagine entering Vajrayogini’s in the shape of her body and I suppose if you have the third eye, you’d be able to see and perceive the fairies, deities, and whatever mystical magical creature there might be there!

    I am most glad to hear that this is one land that forbids people to hunt for animals and there should be no killing of humans too. From here I can sense it’s sacredness. Wow this is definitely a pilgrimage spot I would wish to go too one fine day if I have the merits! x

  15. Cliff on May 29, 2013 at 12:35 am

    This is amazing! I had such a good time reading the adventure stories and facts about Pemako. It sounds like such a mystical place where it chooses the person who is allowed to enter to visit such a magical place. Reading the articles makes me feel like I really want to go visit and explore this exquisite land. It seems so dangerous yet so beautiful, it sounds so incredible to be trekking far into the gorge to finally come to a holy place. I really enjoyed reading the “Journey into the hidden land of pemako”, the words described so beautifully, the experience gain from his exploration is just magnificent. It sounds so amazing that such a place even exist on this planet, untouched by civilization with many mysteries yet to be discovered, it all just sounds so adventurous! The threat of the dams to be build I really do hope it doest proceed, such an amazing place threatened by the existence of modernisation is truly sad. The amount of hardship people have gone through to protect it and preserve it is just not fair. I really wish I could go there to visit and explore. Thank you for sharing this article Rinpoche, I truly enjoyed reading it.

  16. Sharon Saw on May 28, 2013 at 4:51 pm

    Wow. What a magical land… i love the beautiful descriptions of this mythical land… i would aspire to go there though the mentions of leeches and insects are a bit scary! but what is scarier is that if the dam gets built, so much land, ecosystem, and spiritual wealth will be lost. And it will be irreplaceable. Human beings are really our own worst enemy. I do hope i can at least visit the fringes of Pemako one day.

  17. Sofi on May 23, 2013 at 7:20 pm

    Pemako sounds so fascinating with its mystical and hidden treasures, ie. medicinal plants n flowers, sacred places, caves n especially Guru Rinpoche’s throne which still resonate with power/energy. So plush with natural beauty. Even the journey itself is a prilgrimage of strong faith, patience, endurance, walking meditation, etc.. I certainly hope that the Chinese Government will decide against the destruction of this sacred place with their plans to build the hydro-electric dam. May more Buddhist of faith have the chance to make this journey without the destruction by human ‘modernization’.
    Thank you Rinpoche for this knowledge of the existence hidden lands, and making Shambala/pure lands more of a reality that’s within reach for of pure faith n practise.

  18. Lim Han Nee on May 20, 2013 at 12:01 am

    Thank you, Rinpoche , for this enthralling article on Pemako, this sacred beyul, created by Guru Rinpoche, this paradise on earth so rare and ethereal and mystical, but nonetheless real.

    I am fascinated with every detail about Pemako, which actually holds the sacred body of Vajrayogini in a sleeping posture. Pemako, according to Buddhist tradition, is one of 16 earthly paradises, “the ultimate hidden valley where it is prophesied that the seed of humanity will thrive at the end of the world in famine and calamities”.

    Guru Rinpoche’s account in ‘Guide to Pemako’, holds such unbelievably lovely words of description of Pemako.
    “In one of the stamens of the flower of the world is Pemako in the shape of Vajrayogini lying down. Outer, inner and secret levels correspond to the levels of the mind. In the secret chakra of Vajrayogini , there are flowers coming in winter also. If people die here, they do not take karmic rebirth; they go to the Pure-lands….”.

    Then there is this profoundly beautiful statement, coming at the end, about it.
    “Pemako is a dakini manifesting appearance and emptiness to remind us of what reality truly is”.

    It will be a devastating loss, a crashing of the most fascinating dream that is Pamako, if the Chinese Government carries through its decision to build a hydroelectric dam over Pemako. May this not happen.

  19. Patsy on May 19, 2013 at 4:24 pm

    Pemako, a holy paradise that is so mystical and surreal. The people living there are so blessed as according to Guru Rinpoche from the Guidebook to Pemako “If people die here, they do not take karmic
    rebirth; they go to the Pure Lands.” I hope the Government of PRC will not take any drastic steps for the sake of development to establish a “Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon National Reservation”, as it will destroy this holy place.

  20. beatrix ooi on May 19, 2013 at 12:08 am

    Pemako really sounds like a place filled with harmony and peace, the people who live there must be very blessed. Through the pictures above, Pemako really looks like a paradise, a place full of water, mountains, rocks, greens etc. It’s just simply wonderful!
    Thank You for sharing Rinpoche.

  21. David Lai on May 18, 2013 at 7:00 pm

    Wow! This is wonderful article on Pemako. It sounds like a magical and wonderful place of Vajrayogini. I have only seen images of a reclining Pemako Vajrayogini on the net. This is the first time, I have actually seen an article on the real physical paradise on earth associated with Vajrayogini. I have never heard nor read about Beyuls although I know very well of the legend of Shambala.

    I love such mystical stories and I was combing through the article and came across a few regarding beyuls, certain sacred mountains and a stone throne of Guru Rinpoche. My attempt at reading this article is mainly thwarted by the seemingly endless quest to travel to Pemako but hardly any actual descriptions except for a few. Anyway, this serves to increase my curiosity. I am going to look for more information when I freer and perhaps blog about it too! Interesting stuff. Love any legend, stories and traditions associated with Vajrayogini.

  22. benji on May 18, 2013 at 6:46 am

    It was so uplifting to re-,ad about Pemako- i wonder if there is any blessing in that. Thank you Rinpoche !

  23. Jean Ai on May 17, 2013 at 4:14 pm

    Pemako sounds mystical, magical and a total paradise. Ever since Rinpoche first described to us what Shambhala looks like, I’ve always held this image in my mind of cool, pleasant place with steep, craggy gorges and trees hanging over a lush green valley where the sun always shines, and the sky is always blue…and Pemako also looks totally like that!

    Of all the articles to read here, the saddest one was the paragraph about Pemako’s current existence being threatened by encroaching modernisation, that people forget the signficance of the beyuls and protecting them. We always think that we are making improvements to our lives by building this, that and the other but what I have come to realise since moving to Kechara Forest Retreat is that you can’t beat nature. Nature has its way of protecting itself and making sure it is safe, and when greed and a lack of awareness disturbs that balance, that’s when trouble arises. So you have to live with it and work with it because whatever you give to nature, it’ll give back to you manifold.

    So I hope the Himalayan governments remember that money is never worth it, and that chasing for it always brings problems. Capitalising on Pemako’s strategic location will bring temporary financial gain, but ultimately you never know what kind of effects destroying it will have in the long term.

  24. Tsewang Dorjee on May 17, 2013 at 1:34 pm

    Dear Rempoche,
    Tashi Delek
    Your blog is informative and contained wonderful history about Pemakoe.I will be your blog regular reader.

    With regards
    Pekoe Tsewang

  25. Thierry on May 17, 2013 at 1:13 am

    If you have liked this article and got inspired, I invite you to also read this article:
    http://blog.tsemtulku.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/tea-offering-to-vajrayogini-for-the-1st-time.html

    It contains a short and easy prayer of offering tea to Vajrayogini.
    Easy to carry with you and easy to do.
    Hey! there is nothing to loose and everything to gain!

    Vajrayogini is reaching a hand to us, right here right now, if you’d like to grab Her Holy hand, it’s now.

    Thank you so much Rinpoche for making this possible!

  26. Jay Jae on May 17, 2013 at 12:42 am

    Reading this article helps me gain so much faith in the Buddhas and especially in the Tantras of Buddha Heruka Vajrayogini. From the recounts, you could read that every nook and corner is imbued with the blessings of Vajrayogini and for the person who visits, it is not an ordinary visit but a pilgrimage to a sacred site of Kechara itself!

    Anything to do with the sight, sound, touch and smell is an experience one will not find elsewhere as it is infused with the blessings of Vajrayogini.

    I wanna go there sooon!

Leave a Reply

Maximum file size: 15MB each
Allowed file types: jpg, jpeg, gif, png

 

Maximum file size: 50MB
Allowed file type: mp4
Maximum file size: 15MB each
Allowed file types: pdf, docx

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Blog Chat

BLOG CHAT

Dear blog friends,

I’ve created this section for all of you to share your opinions, thoughts and feelings about whatever interests you.

Everyone has a different perspective, so this section is for you.

Tsem Rinpoche


SCHEDULED CHAT SESSIONS / 中文聊天室时间表

THURSDAY
10 - 11PM (GMT +8)
5 - 6AM (PST)
(除了每个月的第一个星期五)
SATURDAY
11AM - 12PM (GMT +8)
FRIDAY 7 - 8PM (PST)

UPCOMING TOPICS FOR NOVEMBER / 十一月份讨论主题

Please come and join in the chat for a fun time and support. See you all there.


Blog Chat Etiquette

These are some simple guidelines to make the blog chat room a positive, enjoyable and enlightening experience for everyone. Please note that as this is a chat room, we chat! Do not flood the chat room, or post without interacting with others.

EXPAND
Be friendly

Remember that these are real people you are chatting with. They may have different opinions to you and come from different cultures. Treat them as you would face to face, and respect their opinions, and they will treat you the same.

Be Patient

Give the room a chance to answer you. Patience is a virtue. And if after awhile, people don't respond, perhaps they don't know the answer or they did not see your question. Do ask again or address someone directly. Do not be offended if people do not or are unable to respond to you.

Be Relevant

This is the blog of H.E. Tsem Rinpoche. Please respect this space. We request that all participants here are respectful of H.E. Tsem Rinpoche and his organisation, Kechara.

Be polite

Avoid the use of language or attitudes which may be offensive to others. If someone is disrespectful to you, ignore them instead of arguing with them.

Please be advised that anyone who contravenes these guidelines may be banned from the chatroom. Banning is at the complete discretion of the administrator of this blog. Should anyone wish to make an appeal or complaint about the behaviour of someone in the chatroom, please copy paste the relevant chat in an email to us at care@kechara.com and state the date and time of the respective conversation.

Please let this be a conducive space for discussions, both light and profound.

KECHARA FOREST RETREAT PROGRESS UPDATES

Here is the latest news and pictorial updates, as it happens, of our upcoming forest retreat project.

The Kechara Forest Retreat is a unique holistic retreat centre focused on the total wellness of body, mind and spirit. This is a place where families and individuals will find peace, nourishment and inspiration in a natural forest environment. At Kechara Forest Retreat, we are committed to give back to society through instilling the next generation with universal positive values such as kindness and compassion.

For more information, please read here (english), here (chinese), or the official site: retreat.kechara.com.

Noticeboard

Name: Email:
For:  
Mail will not be published
  • S.Prathap
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 05:27 PM
    Everyone who visits these places can receive blessings, positive imprints, find an opportunity for introspection, and be inspired by their own potential to gain higher states of mind.

    To date Potala Palace,Jokhang Monastery and Norbuglinka Palace was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Thank you for sharing this informative article which will definitely made things easier for those travelling there.

    Read more : https://bit.ly/374e5Ex
  • Yee Yin
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 04:25 PM
    I rejoice to see the 11th Panchen Lama has started to teach, fulfilling his duty as a high lama. The Panchen Lama reincarnation lineage is as important as the Dalai Lama reincarnation lineage. The previous Panchen Lama was highly respected by Tibetans and Chinese, he was a very high lama. The current incarnation has learned from a very qualified teacher and thus he is also very qualified to teach.

    I have seen a video of him speaking in Chinese, he speaks very well and he is also very charismatic. He is still young, I am sure he can do a lot in preserving and spreading Tibetan Buddhism.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/great-lamas-masters/historic-first-kalachakra-initiation-by-the-11th-panchen-lama.html
  • nicholas
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 04:03 PM
    In 1987, the China Disabled People’s Performing Arts Troupe was formed. They are a professional performing arts troupe made up of 106 performers with hearing and/or visual impairments or physical disabilities. For the next 20 years, the 106 performers worked hard to turn professional in 2000. By 2004, they gave up their government allowance, began supporting themselves… and started raising money for charities! So beautiful no matter what angle you look at it from.

    Aged between 14-19, they slowly-but-steadily learned the art of dancing through sign language with other trainers. To make up for the lack of one or more of their senses, they put in more time, effort and have immense determination. Determination is the key for all success for anyone.

    For any one dance that they perform, they can spend up to one year practicing it for an average of 6-10 hours a day! Each move that they make is practiced about 100 times!!

    They have acquired international recognition and have performed in highly-recognised venues such as Scala in Milan, Carnegie Hall in New York, The Kennedy Center (for Bill Clinton), the Opera House in Sydney and “The Egg” in Beijing. They have performed in more than 60 countries (10 times in the USA alone), been invited to perform at events such as the closing ceremony of the Paralympics in Athens (2004) and Miss World 2004 pageant… and was designated as “UNESCO Art for Peace” by the Director-General of UNESCO!

    Watch the video on their amazing performance at http://bit.ly/2kwvIsU
  • nicholas
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 03:58 PM
    Daibutsu (or 大佛/大仏) means ‘Great Buddha’ or ‘giant Buddha’ in Japanese. It can also be used informally to refer to a big Buddha statue. One such statue is in Kamakura, Japan. The Daibutsu is a statue of Amitabha Buddha and is called The Great Buddha of Kamakura.

    The statue dates back to 1252 AD, and is of Amitabha Buddha in sitting position. The statue is approximately 13.35 meters tall, weighing approximately 93 tons and is made from bronze. It is hollow and visitors can enter to view the interior.

    According to the temple records, the current statue was preceded by another wooden Daibutsu. A court lady named Inadano-Tsubone, who was an attendant of Shogun Yorimoto, had raised funds together with a priest named Joko. When they collected enough funds, they started the construction work in 1238. That statue took 5 years of construction, but was destroyed after a storm hit the area in 1248. The hall that covered the statue was also destroyed.

    They constructed it again, but this time they collected more funds and made a bronze statue. They then constructed a hall to shelter the statue… but it was yet again destroyed in 1335 during a large storm. The hall reconstructed once again, but a typhoon in 1368 brought it down. The 4th (and final) reconstruction of the hall stood for 127 years, until a tsunami hit Japan and destroyed it. However, the bronze statue remained intact and it has been left under the open air since.

    Read more at http://bit.ly/2k4bbvL
  • nicholas
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 03:53 PM
    The serene and majestic Mount Fanjing (or Fanjing Shan 梵凈山), its peaks towering above the cloud banks, is steeped in Buddhist lore and tradition. ‘Fanjing’ (梵凈) means ‘Buddhist tranquillity’. In another explanation, the mountain received its name “Fanjing”, as an abbreviation of Fantianjingtu, a Buddhist term which means “Brahma’s Pure Land”. Mount Fanjing is also called Yuejing (Moon Mirror) Mountain because the temple at its peak can be seen reflected on the surrounding smooth rock on a clear moonlit night.

    Mount Fanjing is part of the Wuling Range in south-western China’s Guizhou Province. Its highest point stands 2,572 meters above sea level and the misty summit is the highest of the entire range. For centuries, both the mountain and the surrounding jungles have been a sanctuary for Buddhist masters seeking solitude in nature. Numerous Buddhist temples are spread across the peaks and slopes, most dedicated to Maitreya and Buddha Shakyamuni. Maitreya, or The Next Buddha, is the patron Bodhisattva of Mount Fanjing.

    Read more about Fanjing Mountain at http://bit.ly/2Qhdnhb
  • nicholas
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 03:44 PM
    In an area of some 120 square kilometres, not far from the picturesque Mount Huangshan, and located in Qingyang County, Anhui Province in China, is a haven that is nestled between the Yangtze River and the Yellow Mountain. Here, in a verdant landscape of pine trees and walls of tall swaying bamboo, lined with streams, waterfalls, hidden caves and rocky configurations, 99 peaks rise up from the soil and protrude through the clouds. The tallest peak is called Shiwang Peak (Peak of Ten Kings) that sits at an elevation of 1,342 metres above sea level. This summit is well known, as are eight of the nearby peaks – Tiantai Peak, Tianwang Peak, Lianhua Peak, Duxiu Peak, Luohan Peak, Wulao Peak, Fuhu Peak and Furong Peak.

    Together, the peaks are known as Jiu Hua Shan (Mount Jiu Hua) or the Nine Glorious/Heavenly Mountains and are considered to be the abode of the Bodhisattva Ksitigarbha, known as Dizangwang Pusa in Chinese.

    Jiu Hua Shan is one of the four holiest sites of Chinese Buddhism. The other three are Mount Wutai in Shanxi province, Mount Emei in Sichuan and Mount Putuo in Zhejiang.

    Read more about Jiu Hua Shan at http://bit.ly/2CNeo8x
  • nicholas
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 03:36 PM
    Pu Tuo Shan, also known as Mount Putuo is located on an island southeast of Shanghai, in the Zhoushan prefecture of Zhejiang province in China. Pu Tuo Shan is believed to be the bodhimanda (place of awakening) of Avalokitesvara, more familiarly known as Guan Yin in China. Due to this believe, Pu Tuo Shan gained its place as one of the five holy mountains in Buddhism and flocks of pilgrims visit this place all year round to get blessings.



    During the Tang Dynasty, Pu Tuo Shan became the center of Chinese Buddhism solely for Guan Yin, while the silk road was being constructed and developed. Ever since then, Pu Tuo Shan has been the main destination for all Guan Yin worshipers. Guan Yin (or Chenrezig, or Avaloketishvara), resides as the patron Bodhisattva on Mount Putuo.

    Pu Tuo Shan consists of many temples and monastic institutes, besides being a place of study for the holy Dharma, it is also a place where many people visit for geological, marine and forestry studies.

    Learn more about Buddhist Practice in Putuo Shan at http://bit.ly/32Jp0jq
  • sarassitham
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 03:18 PM
    Being together as a family builds family unity, creates wonderful memories for children and is a great way to relieve stress and instill family values. Nice to know about Kechara’s land is rich to to grow organic vegetables that is free of pesticides and chemicals. As we know that organic foods are much more healthier than non organic for many reason. It is pricey but rich in nutrients, minerals and vitamins.

    Though organic foods have become more and more popular recently, parents need to start making the correct choices for their children on a daily basis. Thanks for the sharing, had a good view of the fresh and healthy greenery vegetables. Felt very happy for the son who had a great time to work together with his father.
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 01:49 PM
    Despite of all those hardships, Rinpoche had gone through, with Rinpoche having a strong imprint, courage and determination Rinpoche was where today. Rinpoche had to work at Fotomat, for a living to support himself , got robbed , meeting customers and so forth. Rinpoche yet remained happy as Rinpoche could carry on as usual doing long sadhana of Vajra Yogini and Heruka and many mantras.
    Back at his studio apt of Fenmore Apts, Rinpoche could do sadhana and prostrations in the room while his friends will be singing. Not everyone could concentrate with the noise but Rinpoche could. That’s incredible in such a situation.
    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing Rinpoche’s encounter happening before during and after Rinpoche met HH Kyabje Zong Rinpoche. Its an encouragement , inspiration for us .

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/me/tsem-rinpoche-in-an-american-tantric-dress.html
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 01:46 PM
    Rinpoche was indeed a man of multi task ,from a friend, teacher, planner, writer to a coordinator to name a few. Rinpoche down to earth doing all for everyone,benefiting them more than himself. Wow …Rinpoche for seen in all the constructions of Kechara Forest Retreat . Truly amazing, the planning of the hall and those statues as well . Rinpoche would always involved whatever he could for the benefits of all from A to Z. Rinpoche has such wisdom, compassion, love, care and true connection with all of us.. It’s the connection and humanity of a teacher and that is something really beautiful to see.
    Thank you Pastor Jean Ai for sharing this with us.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/growing-up-with-rinpoche-its-all-in-the-details
  • Samfoonheei
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 01:44 PM
    Sentient beings come to this present life from their previous lives and take rebirth. Positive karma are created and their imprints remain on the consciousness. H.E. Tsem Rinpoche has always wanted to be a monk, since young. He had a very strong imprints from a previous existence , that Rinpoche enjoyed drawing images of Buddha and keen to read Buddhist books. Rinpoche will somehow go and looked for Buddhist Temple to practice Dharma teachings without his foster parent knowledge. Rinpoche could be a movie star but Rinpoche chose to be a monk where Rinpoche would benefit to all sentient beings. Well, Rinpoche had since kept his vows until the last day . Rinpoche did say before that the happiest days of his life was at the monastery serving his teachers.
    Thank you Pastor David for sharing this short post.

    https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/one-minute-story/tales-with-my-lama-on-being-a-monk
  • Sofi
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 10:19 AM
    The Guangxi Community in Bentong

    Bentong is one of the few towns in Malaysia which has a majority of Guangxi Chinese within the Chinese community. Based on the information I gathered from the Bentong Guangxi Association, it is estimated that around 75% of the Chinese population in Bentong can safely trace their ancestry back to Guangxi Province, China. Notably, about 90% of the Chinese population in the Perting Chinese New Village are Guangxi Chinese.

    Find out more of Bentong’s community: http://bit.ly/BentongGuangXi
  • Sofi
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 10:04 AM
    The Sacred Vajrayogini of Ratsag Monastery

    Ratsag is a contraction of Ra Lotsawa’s clan name and the Tibetan expression tsagsutsu, which means “success.” This indicates that Ratsag Monastery was the last of the set of 108 monasteries that Ra Lotsawa pledged to build. His connection to Ra Bende Yonten Gyalpo of the inscription, aside from sharing the same family name, remains unknown. Nevertheless, the occupants of the monastery and the local people all continue to regard Ratsag Monastery as being founded by Ra Lotsawa.

    Read more of this monastery’s interesting history: http://bit.ly/RatsagMonastery
  • Sofi
    Friday, Nov 15. 2019 09:52 AM
    Videos Redressing the Misinformation About Dorje Shugden and the Tibetan Situation

    The CTA officially banned the Dorje Shugden practice in 1996. At first, some Tibetans believed the CTA’s reasons for the ban even though it did not make much sense to those who knew better. The deity that the CTA was disparaging was trusted and relied on by the most highly attained masters, abbots of great monasteries, erudite scholars and geshes over the centuries. They were precious vessels of the entire corpus of Buddhist practices including the Sutras and Tantras, and it is just not possible that they could have been right about everything else and wrong about Dorje Shugden.

    Find out more of why its simply illogical to ban Dorje Shugden’s authentic practice: http://bit.ly/RedressingTruths
  • Sofi
    Thursday, Nov 14. 2019 10:47 PM
    The Sakya Lineage & Dorje Shugden

    The account of how this came to be was told beautifully by Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche in his writings on Dorje Shugden. That is why in our tradition, we request Dorje Shugden to come forth from the great Sakya monastery when we engage in his pujas today. This can be seen in the invocation verses of Dorje Shugden puja that was composed by Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche.

    Read more of how Dorje Shugden has a history in the Sakya lineage: http://bit.ly/SakyaDSLink

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · »

Messages from Rinpoche

Scroll down within the box to view more messages from Rinpoche. Click on the images to enlarge. Click on 'older messages' to view archived messages. Use 'prev' and 'next' links to navigate between pages

Use this URL to link to this section directly: https://www.tsemrinpoche.com/#messages-from-rinpoche

Previous Live Videos

MORE VIDEOS

Shugdenpas Speaking Up Across The Globe

From Europe Shugden Association:


MORE VIDEOS

From Tibetan Public Talk:


MORE VIDEOS

CREDITS

Concept: Tsem Rinpoche
Technical: Lew Kwan Leng, Justin Ripley, Yong Swee Keong
Design: Justin Ripley, Cynthia Lee
Content: Tsem Rinpoche, Justin Ripley, Pastor Shin Tan, Sarah Yap
Admin: Pastor Loh Seng Piow, Beng Kooi

I must thank my dharma blog team who are great assets to me, Kechara and growth of dharma in this wonderful region. I am honoured and thrilled to work with them. I really am. Maybe I don't say it enough to them, but I am saying it now. I APPRECIATE THESE GUYS VERY MUCH!

Tsem Rinpoche

Total views today
2,963
Total views up to date
19,062,839

Stay Updated

What Am I Writing Now

@tsemrinpoche on Instagram

Facebook Fans Youtube Views Blog Views
Animal Care Fund
  Bigfoot, Yeti, Sasquatch

The Unknown

The Known and unknown are both feared,
Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
The unknown may be growth and opportunities,
One shall never know if one fears the unknown more than the known.
Who says the unknown would be worse than the known?
But then again, the unknown is sometimes worse than the known. In the end nothing is known unless we endeavour,
So go pursue all the way with the unknown,
because all unknown with familiarity becomes the known.
~Tsem Rinpoche

Photos On The Go

Click on the images to view the bigger version. And scroll down and click on "View All Photos" to view more images.
Third picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
4 months ago
Third picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
Second picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
4 months ago
Second picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
First picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal.
Height: 33ft (10m)
4 months ago
First picture-Standing Manjushri Statue at Chowar, Kirtipur, Nepal. Height: 33ft (10m)
The first title published by Kechara Comics is Karuna Finds A Way. It tells the tale of high-school sweethearts Karuna and Adam who had what some would call the dream life. Everything was going great for them until one day when reality came knocking on their door. Caught in a surprise swindle, this loving family who never harmed anyone found themselves out of luck and down on their fortune. Determined to save her family, Karuna goes all out to find a solution. See what she does- https://bit.ly/2LSKuWo
4 months ago
The first title published by Kechara Comics is Karuna Finds A Way. It tells the tale of high-school sweethearts Karuna and Adam who had what some would call the dream life. Everything was going great for them until one day when reality came knocking on their door. Caught in a surprise swindle, this loving family who never harmed anyone found themselves out of luck and down on their fortune. Determined to save her family, Karuna goes all out to find a solution. See what she does- https://bit.ly/2LSKuWo
Very powerful story! Tibetan Resistance group Chushi Gangdruk reveals how Dalai Lama escaped in 1959- https://bit.ly/2S9VMGX
4 months ago
Very powerful story! Tibetan Resistance group Chushi Gangdruk reveals how Dalai Lama escaped in 1959- https://bit.ly/2S9VMGX
At Kechara Forest Retreat land we have nice fresh spinach growing free of chemicals and pesticides. Yes!
4 months ago
At Kechara Forest Retreat land we have nice fresh spinach growing free of chemicals and pesticides. Yes!
See beautiful pictures of Manjushri Guest House here- https://bit.ly/2WGo0ti
5 months ago
See beautiful pictures of Manjushri Guest House here- https://bit.ly/2WGo0ti
Beginner’s Introduction to Dorje Shugden~Very good overview https://bit.ly/2QQNfYv
5 months ago
Beginner’s Introduction to Dorje Shugden~Very good overview https://bit.ly/2QQNfYv
Fresh eggplants grown on Kechara Forest Retreat\'s land here in Malaysia
5 months ago
Fresh eggplants grown on Kechara Forest Retreat's land here in Malaysia
Most Venerable Uppalavanna – The Chief Female Disciple of Buddha Shakyamuni - She exhibited many supernatural abilities gained from meditation and proved to the world females and males are equal in spirituality- https://bit.ly/31d9Rat
5 months ago
Most Venerable Uppalavanna – The Chief Female Disciple of Buddha Shakyamuni - She exhibited many supernatural abilities gained from meditation and proved to the world females and males are equal in spirituality- https://bit.ly/31d9Rat
Thailand’s ‘Renegade’ Yet Powerful Buddhist Nuns~ https://bit.ly/2Z1C02m
5 months ago
Thailand’s ‘Renegade’ Yet Powerful Buddhist Nuns~ https://bit.ly/2Z1C02m
Mahapajapati Gotami – the first Buddhist nun ordained by Lord Buddha- https://bit.ly/2IjD8ru
5 months ago
Mahapajapati Gotami – the first Buddhist nun ordained by Lord Buddha- https://bit.ly/2IjD8ru
The Largest Buddha Shakyamuni in Russia | 俄罗斯最大的释迦牟尼佛画像- https://bit.ly/2Wpclni
5 months ago
The Largest Buddha Shakyamuni in Russia | 俄罗斯最大的释迦牟尼佛画像- https://bit.ly/2Wpclni
Sacred Vajra Yogini
5 months ago
Sacred Vajra Yogini
Dorje Shugden works & archives - a labour of commitment - https://bit.ly/30Tp2p8
5 months ago
Dorje Shugden works & archives - a labour of commitment - https://bit.ly/30Tp2p8
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha.
6 months ago
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha.
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha. She was his step-mother and aunt. Buddha\'s mother had passed away at his birth so he was raised by Gotami.
6 months ago
Mahapajapati Gotami, who was the first nun ordained by Lord Buddha. She was his step-mother and aunt. Buddha's mother had passed away at his birth so he was raised by Gotami.
Another nun disciple of Lord Buddha\'s. She had achieved great spiritual abilities and high attainments. She would be a proper object of refuge. This image of the eminent bhikkhuni (nun) disciple of the Buddha, Uppalavanna Theri.
6 months ago
Another nun disciple of Lord Buddha's. She had achieved great spiritual abilities and high attainments. She would be a proper object of refuge. This image of the eminent bhikkhuni (nun) disciple of the Buddha, Uppalavanna Theri.
Wandering Ascetic Painting by Nirdesha Munasinghe
6 months ago
Wandering Ascetic Painting by Nirdesha Munasinghe
High Sri Lankan monks visit Kechara to bless our land, temple, Buddha and Dorje Shugden images. They were very kind-see pictures- https://bit.ly/2HQie2M
6 months ago
High Sri Lankan monks visit Kechara to bless our land, temple, Buddha and Dorje Shugden images. They were very kind-see pictures- https://bit.ly/2HQie2M
This is pretty amazing!

First Sri Lankan Buddhist temple opened in Dubai!!!
6 months ago
This is pretty amazing! First Sri Lankan Buddhist temple opened in Dubai!!!
My Dharma boy (left) and Oser girl loves to laze around on the veranda in the mornings. They enjoy all the trees, grass and relaxing under the hot sun. Sunbathing is a favorite daily activity. I care about these two doggies of mine very much and I enjoy seeing them happy. They are with me always. Tsem Rinpoche

Always be kind to animals and eat vegetarian- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
6 months ago
My Dharma boy (left) and Oser girl loves to laze around on the veranda in the mornings. They enjoy all the trees, grass and relaxing under the hot sun. Sunbathing is a favorite daily activity. I care about these two doggies of mine very much and I enjoy seeing them happy. They are with me always. Tsem Rinpoche Always be kind to animals and eat vegetarian- https://bit.ly/2Psp8h2
After you left me Mumu, I was alone. I have no family or kin. You were my family. I can\'t stop thinking of you and I can\'t forget you. My bond and connection with you is so strong. I wish you were by my side. Tsem Rinpoche
6 months ago
After you left me Mumu, I was alone. I have no family or kin. You were my family. I can't stop thinking of you and I can't forget you. My bond and connection with you is so strong. I wish you were by my side. Tsem Rinpoche
This story is a life-changer. Learn about the incredible Forest Man of India | 印度“森林之子”- https://bit.ly/2Eh4vRS
6 months ago
This story is a life-changer. Learn about the incredible Forest Man of India | 印度“森林之子”- https://bit.ly/2Eh4vRS
Part 2-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
6 months ago
Part 2-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
Part 1-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
6 months ago
Part 1-Beautiful billboard in Malaysia of a powerful Tibetan hero whose life serves as a great inspiration- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
The great Protector Manjushri Dorje Shugden depicted in the beautiful Mongolian style. To download a high resolution file: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
6 months ago
The great Protector Manjushri Dorje Shugden depicted in the beautiful Mongolian style. To download a high resolution file: https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
The Mystical land of Shambhala is finally ready for everyone to feast their eyes and be blessed. A beautiful post with information, art work, history, spirituality and a beautiful book composed by His Holiness the 6th Panchen Rinpoche. ~ https://bit.ly/309MHBi
6 months ago
The Mystical land of Shambhala is finally ready for everyone to feast their eyes and be blessed. A beautiful post with information, art work, history, spirituality and a beautiful book composed by His Holiness the 6th Panchen Rinpoche. ~ https://bit.ly/309MHBi
Beautiful pictures of the huge Buddha in Longkou Nanshan- https://bit.ly/2LsBxVb
6 months ago
Beautiful pictures of the huge Buddha in Longkou Nanshan- https://bit.ly/2LsBxVb
The reason-Very interesting thought- https://bit.ly/2V7VT5r
6 months ago
The reason-Very interesting thought- https://bit.ly/2V7VT5r
NEW Bigfoot cafe in Malaysia! Food is delicious!- https://bit.ly/2VxdGau
6 months ago
NEW Bigfoot cafe in Malaysia! Food is delicious!- https://bit.ly/2VxdGau
DON\'T MISS THIS!~How brave Bonnie survived by living with a herd of deer~ https://bit.ly/2Lre2eY
6 months ago
DON'T MISS THIS!~How brave Bonnie survived by living with a herd of deer~ https://bit.ly/2Lre2eY
Global Superpower China Will Cut Meat Consumption by 50%! Very interesting, find out more- https://bit.ly/2V1sJFh
6 months ago
Global Superpower China Will Cut Meat Consumption by 50%! Very interesting, find out more- https://bit.ly/2V1sJFh
You can download this beautiful Egyptian style Dorje Shugden Free- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
6 months ago
You can download this beautiful Egyptian style Dorje Shugden Free- https://bit.ly/2Nt3FHz
Beautiful high file for print of Lord Manjushri. May you be blessed- https://bit.ly/2V8mwZe
6 months ago
Beautiful high file for print of Lord Manjushri. May you be blessed- https://bit.ly/2V8mwZe
Mongolian (Oymiakon) Shaman in Siberia, Russia. That is his real outfit he wears. Very unique. TR
6 months ago
Mongolian (Oymiakon) Shaman in Siberia, Russia. That is his real outfit he wears. Very unique. TR
Find one of the most beautiful temples in the world in Nara, Japan. It is the 1,267 year old Todai-ji temple that houses a 15 meter Buddha Vairocana statue who is a cosmic and timeless Buddha. Emperor Shomu who sponsored this beautiful temple eventually abdicated and ordained as a Buddhist monk. Very interesting history and story. One of the places everyone should visit- https://bit.ly/2VgsHhK
6 months ago
Find one of the most beautiful temples in the world in Nara, Japan. It is the 1,267 year old Todai-ji temple that houses a 15 meter Buddha Vairocana statue who is a cosmic and timeless Buddha. Emperor Shomu who sponsored this beautiful temple eventually abdicated and ordained as a Buddhist monk. Very interesting history and story. One of the places everyone should visit- https://bit.ly/2VgsHhK
Manjusri Kumara (bodhisattva of wisdom), India, Pala dynesty, 9th century, stone, Honolulu Academy of Arts
6 months ago
Manjusri Kumara (bodhisattva of wisdom), India, Pala dynesty, 9th century, stone, Honolulu Academy of Arts
Silver Manjusri figure from Ngemplak Semongan (Indonesia). Apparently during the Shailendra Dynasty, Mahayana Buddhism was very strong in Indonesia. This Dynasty promoted Mahayana Buddhism and Manjushri was a principal Buddha of worship.
6 months ago
Silver Manjusri figure from Ngemplak Semongan (Indonesia). Apparently during the Shailendra Dynasty, Mahayana Buddhism was very strong in Indonesia. This Dynasty promoted Mahayana Buddhism and Manjushri was a principal Buddha of worship.
In Buddhism: The Importance of Having a Clean Room- https://bit.ly/2ZgrbKS
6 months ago
In Buddhism: The Importance of Having a Clean Room- https://bit.ly/2ZgrbKS
There is an area near Lumbini, Nepal, they have sightings of Yeti for hundreds of years. So they have signages in the area with Yeti artwork to highlight this. Interesting. TR
6 months ago
There is an area near Lumbini, Nepal, they have sightings of Yeti for hundreds of years. So they have signages in the area with Yeti artwork to highlight this. Interesting. TR
Photos of footprints (Yeti) are from a high altitude pass (Darwa Pass) connecting Gangotri valley to Yamunotri valley through old pilgrim route.
6 months ago
Photos of footprints (Yeti) are from a high altitude pass (Darwa Pass) connecting Gangotri valley to Yamunotri valley through old pilgrim route.
Beautiful picture. Rare. Three holy beings.
6 months ago
Beautiful picture. Rare. Three holy beings.
May 1, 2019-I really enjoy this picture of these visitors visiting Dorje Shugden\'s grotto in Kechara Forest Retreat today. They look happy, light and blessed after doing their prayers to Dorje Shugden. I wanted to share this picture.- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
7 months ago
May 1, 2019-I really enjoy this picture of these visitors visiting Dorje Shugden's grotto in Kechara Forest Retreat today. They look happy, light and blessed after doing their prayers to Dorje Shugden. I wanted to share this picture.- https://bit.ly/2UltNE4
A postcard of my great grand aunt Princess Nirgidma of Torghut-Tsem Rinpoche
7 months ago
A postcard of my great grand aunt Princess Nirgidma of Torghut-Tsem Rinpoche
Rei Kawakubo – Grand Dame of ‘Hiroshima Chic’- https://bit.ly/2Vz4N06
7 months ago
Rei Kawakubo – Grand Dame of ‘Hiroshima Chic’- https://bit.ly/2Vz4N06
Just now, this beautiful grape and orange infused water drink with a blue glass was brought in for me. I was amazed at the colors. Tsem Rinpoche
7 months ago
Just now, this beautiful grape and orange infused water drink with a blue glass was brought in for me. I was amazed at the colors. Tsem Rinpoche
We have to look in and change from within to find the way out of all that makes us unhappy.~Tsem Rinpoche 

www.tsemrinpoche.com
7 months ago
We have to look in and change from within to find the way out of all that makes us unhappy.~Tsem Rinpoche http://www.tsemrinpoche.com
Click on "View All Photos" above to view more images

Videos On The Go

Please click on the images to watch video
  • Always be kind to animals-They deserve to live just like us.
    4 months ago
    Always be kind to animals-They deserve to live just like us.
    Whales and dolphins playing with each other in the Pacific sea. Nature is truly incredible!
  • Bodha stupa July 2019-
    4 months ago
    Bodha stupa July 2019-
    Rainy period
  • Cute Tara girl having a snack. She is one of Kechara Forest Retreat’s resident doggies.
    5 months ago
    Cute Tara girl having a snack. She is one of Kechara Forest Retreat’s resident doggies.
  • Your Next Meal!
    5 months ago
    Your Next Meal!
    Yummy? Tasty? Behind the scenes of the meat on your plates. Meat is a killing industry.
  • This is Daw
    5 months ago
    This is Daw
    This is what they do to get meat on tables, and to produce belts and jackets. Think twice before your next purchase.
  • Don’t Take My Mummy Away!
    5 months ago
    Don’t Take My Mummy Away!
    Look at the poor baby chasing after the mother. Why do we do that to them? It's time to seriously think about our choices in life and how they affect others. Be kind. Don't break up families.
  • They do this every day!
    5 months ago
    They do this every day!
    This is how they are being treated every day of their lives. Please do something to stop the brutality. Listen to their cries for help!
  • What happened at Fair Oaks Farm?
    5 months ago
    What happened at Fair Oaks Farm?
    The largest undercover dairy investigation of all time. See what they found out at Fair Oaks Farm.
  • She’s going to spend her whole life here without being able to move correctly. Like a machine. They are the slaves of the people and are viewed as a product. It’s immoral. Billions of terrestrial animals die annually. Billions. You can’t even imagine it. And all that because people don’t want to give up meat, even though there are so many alternatives. ~ Gabriel Azimov
    5 months ago
    She’s going to spend her whole life here without being able to move correctly. Like a machine. They are the slaves of the people and are viewed as a product. It’s immoral. Billions of terrestrial animals die annually. Billions. You can’t even imagine it. And all that because people don’t want to give up meat, even though there are so many alternatives. ~ Gabriel Azimov
  • Our Malaysian Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir speaks so well, logically and regarding our country’s collaboration with China for growth. It is refreshing to listen to Dr. Mahathir’s thoughts. He said our country can look to China for many more things such as technology and so on. Tsem Rinpoche
    7 months ago
    Our Malaysian Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir speaks so well, logically and regarding our country’s collaboration with China for growth. It is refreshing to listen to Dr. Mahathir’s thoughts. He said our country can look to China for many more things such as technology and so on. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This is the first time His Holiness Dalai Lama mentions he had some very serious illness. Very worrying. This video is captured April 2019.
    7 months ago
    This is the first time His Holiness Dalai Lama mentions he had some very serious illness. Very worrying. This video is captured April 2019.
  • Beautiful Monastery in Hong Kong
    7 months ago
    Beautiful Monastery in Hong Kong
  • This dog thanks his hero in such a touching way. Tsem Rinpoche
    7 months ago
    This dog thanks his hero in such a touching way. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
    7 months ago
    Join Tsem Rinpoche in prayer for H.H. Dalai Lama’s long life~ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYy7JcveikU&feature=youtu.be
  • These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
    7 months ago
    These people going on pilgrimage to a holy mountain and prostrating out of devotion and for pilgrimage in Tibet. Such determination for spiritual practice. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
    7 months ago
    Beautiful new casing in Kechara for Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
    7 months ago
    Get ready to laugh real hard. This is Kechara’s version of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane!” We have some real talents in this video clip.
  • Recitation of Dorje Dermo‘s mantra or the Dharani of Glorious Vajra Claws. This powerful mantra is meant to destroy all obstacles that come in our way. Beneficial to play this mantra in our environments.
    8 months ago
    Recitation of Dorje Dermo‘s mantra or the Dharani of Glorious Vajra Claws. This powerful mantra is meant to destroy all obstacles that come in our way. Beneficial to play this mantra in our environments.
  • Beautiful
    8 months ago
    Beautiful
    Beautiful sacred Severed Head Vajra Yogini from Tsem Rinpoche's personal shrine.
  • My little monster cute babies Dharma and Oser. Take a look and get a cute attack for the day! Tsem Rinpoche
    8 months ago
    My little monster cute babies Dharma and Oser. Take a look and get a cute attack for the day! Tsem Rinpoche
  • Plse watch this short video and see how all sentient beings are capable of tenderness and love. We should never hurt animals nor should we eat them. Tsem Rinpoche
    8 months ago
    Plse watch this short video and see how all sentient beings are capable of tenderness and love. We should never hurt animals nor should we eat them. Tsem Rinpoche
  • Cruelty of some people have no limits and it’s heartbreaking. Being kind cost nothing. Tsem Rinpoche
    9 months ago
    Cruelty of some people have no limits and it’s heartbreaking. Being kind cost nothing. Tsem Rinpoche
  • SUPER ADORABLE and must see
    10 months ago
    SUPER ADORABLE and must see
    Tsem Rinpoche's dog Oser girl enjoying her snack in her play pen.
  • Cute!
    10 months ago
    Cute!
    Oser girl loves the balcony so much. - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTcoWpKJm2c
  • Uncle Wong
    10 months ago
    Uncle Wong
    We were told by Uncle Wong he is very faithful toward Dorje Shugden. Dorje Shugden has extended help to him on several occasions and now Uncle Wong comes daily to make incense offerings to Dorje Shugden. He is grateful towards the help he was given.
  • Tsem Rinpoche’s Schnauzer Dharma boy fights Robot sphere from Arkonide!
    10 months ago
    Tsem Rinpoche’s Schnauzer Dharma boy fights Robot sphere from Arkonide!
  • Cute baby owl found and rescued
    10 months ago
    Cute baby owl found and rescued
    We rescued a lost baby owl in Kechara Forest Retreat.
  • Nice cups from Kechara!!
    11 months ago
    Nice cups from Kechara!!
    Dorje Shugden people's lives matter!
  • Enjoy a peaceful morning at Kechara Forest Retreat
    11 months ago
    Enjoy a peaceful morning at Kechara Forest Retreat
    Chirping birds and other forest animals create a joyful melody at the Vajrayogini stupa in Kechara Forest Retreat (Bentong, Malaysia).
  • His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    11 months ago
    His Holiness Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche makes offering of khata to Dorje Shugden.
    Trijang Rinpoche never gave up his devotion to Dorje Shugden no matter how much Tibetan government in exile pressured him to give up. He stayed loyal inspiring so many of us.
  • This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    2 yearss ago
    This topic is so hot in many circles right now.
    This video is thought-provoking and very interesting. Watch! Thanks so much to our friends at LIVEKINDLY.
  • Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
    2 yearss ago
    Chiropractic CHANGES LIFE for teenager with acute PAIN & DEAD LEG.
  • BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
    2 yearss ago
    BEAUTIFUL PLACE IN NEW YORK STATE-AMAZING.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
    2 yearss ago
    Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the meat Industry with real action.
  • Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
    2 yearss ago
    Do psychic mediums have messages from beyond?
  • Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    Lovely gift for my 52nd Birthday. Tsem Rinpoche
  • This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    2 yearss ago
    This 59-year-old chimpanzee was refusing food and ready to die until...
    she received “one last visit from an old friend” 💔💔
  • Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
    2 yearss ago
    Bigfoot sighted again and made it to the news.
  • Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
    2 yearss ago
    Casper is such a cute and adorable. I like him.
  • Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant  Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
    2 yearss ago
    Dorje Shugden Monastery Amarbayasgalant Mongolia's Ancient Hidden Gem
  • Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
    2 yearss ago
    Don't you love Hamburgers? See how 'delicious' it is here!
  • Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
    2 yearss ago
    Such a beautiful and powerful message from a person who knows the meaning of life. Tsem Rinpoche
  • What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    2 yearss ago
    What the meat industry figured out is that you don't need healthy animals to make a profit.
    Sick animals are more profitable... farms calculate how close to death they can keep animals without killing them. That's the business model. How quickly they can be made to grow, how tightly they can be packed, how much or how little can they eat, how sick they can get without dying... We live in a world in which it's conventional to treat an animal like a block of wood. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer
  • This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
    2 yearss ago
    This video went viral and it's a must watch!!
  • SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    2 yearss ago
    SEE HOW THIS ANIMAL SERIAL KILLER HAS NO ISSUE BLUDGEONING THIS DEFENSELESS BEING.
    This happens daily in slaughterhouse so you can get your pork and Bak ku teh. Stop eating meat.

ASK A PASTOR


Ask the Pastors

A section for you to clarify your Dharma questions with Kechara’s esteemed pastors.

Just post your name and your question below and one of our pastors will provide you with an answer.

Scroll down and click on "View All Questions" to view archived questions.

View All Questions

CHAT PICTURES

Owen Liew offered incense to Lama Tsongkhapa, Dorje Shugden and all Buddhas on behalf of KISG. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
3 days ago
Owen Liew offered incense to Lama Tsongkhapa, Dorje Shugden and all Buddhas on behalf of KISG. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
Steve from Ipoh offered lights to Lama Tsongkhapa, Dorje Shugden and all Buddhas prior to our weekly Dorje Shugden puja. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
3 days ago
Steve from Ipoh offered lights to Lama Tsongkhapa, Dorje Shugden and all Buddhas prior to our weekly Dorje Shugden puja. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
KISG has completed our weekly Dorje Shugden puja in Ipoh today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
3 days ago
KISG has completed our weekly Dorje Shugden puja in Ipoh today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
Throwback - Parent and children stayed together to do breathing meditation ~ 2018 Pilgrimage cum Camp, Kechara Forest Retreat. Alice, KSDS
3 days ago
Throwback - Parent and children stayed together to do breathing meditation ~ 2018 Pilgrimage cum Camp, Kechara Forest Retreat. Alice, KSDS
Throwback - KSDS parent and student visited Kechara Forest Retreat ~ Wesak Day for virtuous deeds and have fun together. Alice, KSDS
3 days ago
Throwback - KSDS parent and student visited Kechara Forest Retreat ~ Wesak Day for virtuous deeds and have fun together. Alice, KSDS
Wonderful to see these 2 siblings learn dharma together and pray to Manjushri before the class start. Alice, KSDS
3 days ago
Wonderful to see these 2 siblings learn dharma together and pray to Manjushri before the class start. Alice, KSDS
The youngest in the class of only 3 years ago learned how to do full lotus pose for breathing meditation session. Alice, KSDS
3 days ago
The youngest in the class of only 3 years ago learned how to do full lotus pose for breathing meditation session. Alice, KSDS
The youngest group of KSDS are very helpful in arranging the seats before the class. Alice, KSDS
3 days ago
The youngest group of KSDS are very helpful in arranging the seats before the class. Alice, KSDS
Kechara Ipoh Study Group carried out Mother Tara's prayer recitations on Sunday morning. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
1 week ago
Kechara Ipoh Study Group carried out Mother Tara's prayer recitations on Sunday morning. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
Throwback- Group work activities during camp. Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback- Group work activities during camp. Lin Mun KSDS
Throwback- Ice breaking session. Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback- Ice breaking session. Lin Mun KSDS
Throwback - Decorating Kechara Oasis, artwork dedication from Sunday class kids. Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback - Decorating Kechara Oasis, artwork dedication from Sunday class kids. Lin Mun KSDS
Throwback- Chinese New Year activity during dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback- Chinese New Year activity during dharma class. Lin Mun KSDS
Throwback- WOAH Camp 2017 , Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback- WOAH Camp 2017 , Lin Mun KSDS
Throwback - KSDS camp in KFR, Lin Mun KSDS
2 weeks ago
Throwback - KSDS camp in KFR, Lin Mun KSDS
Teacher Grace led the teenage class on a blog chat article. Lin Mun KSDS
3 weeks ago
Teacher Grace led the teenage class on a blog chat article. Lin Mun KSDS
Students and teachers were so excited with the performance hat. Lin Mun KSDS
3 weeks ago
Students and teachers were so excited with the performance hat. Lin Mun KSDS
Teacher Asyley and teacher Alice shared the biography of HE Tsem Tulku Rinpoche to student. Lin Mun KSDS
3 weeks ago
Teacher Asyley and teacher Alice shared the biography of HE Tsem Tulku Rinpoche to student. Lin Mun KSDS
Class age 10-12 is lead by teacher Jayce. Lin Mun KSDS
3 weeks ago
Class age 10-12 is lead by teacher Jayce. Lin Mun KSDS
Teacher Kien is teacher for class age 7-9 years old. Lin Mun KSDS
3 weeks ago
Teacher Kien is teacher for class age 7-9 years old. Lin Mun KSDS
Glad to have Chef Anis and Iswan for joining us last night for the food distribution :) ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
3 weeks ago
Glad to have Chef Anis and Iswan for joining us last night for the food distribution :) ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
The generous support from sponsors and volunteers have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thanks to Add Hope Malaysia and students from First City University College! #Kechara #foodbank #hungerknowsnobarriers #volunteer ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
3 weeks ago
The generous support from sponsors and volunteers have made it possible for us to continue with this contribution to those less fortunate. Thanks to Add Hope Malaysia and students from First City University College! #Kechara #foodbank #hungerknowsnobarriers #volunteer ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Thank you very much to Rasa Sayang AEON Club team for assisting us with surplus food collection and also distribution last Saturday. ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
3 weeks ago
Thank you very much to Rasa Sayang AEON Club team for assisting us with surplus food collection and also distribution last Saturday. ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Thankful to James and Jien Howe for conducting the safety briefing to the new volunteers last night. ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
4 weeks ago
Thankful to James and Jien Howe for conducting the safety briefing to the new volunteers last night. ~ Vivian @ Kechara Soup Kitchen
Special thanks to Calvin who came as early as 12.30 p.m. He helped us to spring-clean the chapel before today's events; Bird Liberation and Dorje Shugden puja @ KPSG, Jacinta
4 weeks ago
Special thanks to Calvin who came as early as 12.30 p.m. He helped us to spring-clean the chapel before today's events; Bird Liberation and Dorje Shugden puja @ KPSG, Jacinta
The Promise
  These books will change your life
  Tsem Rinpoche's Long Life Prayer by H.H. Trijang Choktrul Rinpoche
  Support Blog Team
Lamps For Life
  Robe Offerings
  Vajrayogini Stupa Fund
  White Tara Mantra Bank Project
  Rinpoche's Medical Fund
  Dana Offerings
  Soup Kitchen Project
 
Zong Rinpoche

Archives

YOUR FEEDBACK

Live Visitors Counter
Page Views By Country
United States 4,211,369
Malaysia 4,098,684
India 1,667,017
Nepal 786,218
Singapore 752,342
United Kingdom 666,531
Canada 578,896
Bhutan 557,166
Australia 448,159
Philippines 345,826
Indonesia 338,265
Germany 273,509
France 265,835
Brazil 186,919
Taiwan 175,889
Vietnam 175,154
Thailand 171,527
Italy 134,302
Mongolia 131,024
Spain 127,547
Portugal 126,719
Turkey 114,958
Netherlands 113,938
United Arab Emirates 98,447
Russia 93,278
Romania 87,359
Hong Kong 85,010
Sri Lanka 83,792
South Africa 77,265
Mexico 76,083
Myanmar (Burma) 72,506
New Zealand 69,718
Switzerland 65,753
Japan 64,153
South Korea 59,286
Cambodia 59,272
Bangladesh 53,860
Pakistan 52,987
China 46,528
Total Pageviews: 19,062,835

Login

Dorje Shugden
Click to watch my talk about Dorje Shugden....