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July 22, 2017
The World of Chinese Ghosts
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The Chinese ghost has been deeply embedded in Chinese culture and folklore since ancient times.

The Chinese ghost has been deeply embedded in Chinese culture and folklore since ancient times.

Chinese Ghosts – Fact or Fiction?

Ghosts are commonly featured in Chinese folklore. Ghost stories existed as part of the old oral tradition during the Shang Dynasty (1600 – 1046 BCE) and expanded further as Chinese literature began to flourish. Ghost stories continue to be popular today, not just in China but also in the Southeast Asian region.

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Chinese character for the word “Ghost”

Generally, the ghost is perceived to be the non-corporeal manifestation of a person who has died. According to folklore, Chinese ghosts are usually malevolent in nature, cause harm and create chaos for the living. The ancient Chinese were huge believers in ghosts as they thought that when a person died, their soul would journey across a bridge to the afterlife.

During this crossing of the bridge, the deceased would be judged if they were worthy. If they had lived a life of virtue, they could continue on. Once they reached the other side, they either took rebirth as human beings or animals, or went to live with the Gods, depending on their beliefs.

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The bridge where the dead will be judged

However, if they had performed evil deeds, they would fall from the bridge into Hell. Each of the eighteen levels of Hell had specific punishments for different sins. Thus, knowledge of the punishment awaiting wrongdoers in the afterlife brought relief to those wronged.

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The Hell realm is known for serving justice in the afterlife

Traditionally, society recognised the existence of ghosts as a natural extension of ancestor worship. This stemmed from the belief that death is not the end but just a journey to one’s continued existence in the next life, according to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism.

Buddhists, for example, believe that those who have passed away will take rebirth in one of the Six Realms – the God, Demi-God, Human, Animal, Spirit and Hell realms. Confucians, on the other hand, believe that those who have led a virtuous life will dwell with the Gods and can be invoked upon for assistance or protection.

 

The Origins of Chinese Ghosts

The origins of Chinese ghosts can be traced back to the pre-Qin Dynasty (221 to 206 BC) and was initially spread by word of mouth. By the time the written word and literature was developed, the “ghost culture” literally came alive. Some of the more well-known ghost literatures are ‘Notes on Searching Deities’ (搜神記), ‘The Story of Chinese Gods’ (封神传), and ‘Journey to the West’ (西遊記).

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‘Journey to the West’ tells of the legendary pilgrimage of a Tang Dynasty Buddhist monk, Xuanzang, who travelled to the Western Regions to secure sacred Buddhist texts.

‘Journey to the West’ is about the legendary pilgrimage of a Tang Dynasty Buddhist monk, Xuanzang, who travelled to the ‘Western Regions’ (India) to secure sacred Buddhist texts. He returned after many trials and much suffering. It was Buddha who gave him this task and provided him with three protectors who agreed to help him as atonement for their own sins. They were Sun Wukong, Zhu Wuneng and Sha Wujing, together with a dragon prince who acted as Xuanzang’s steed, a white horse.

Culturally, the ancient Chinese believed that the first step in the journey after death was the funeral. Thus, it was essential that proper funeral and burial rites were performed for the deceased, for a mistake could cause their soul to be unhappy and they could return to haunt the living.

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Proper burial rites had to be carried out by a qualified person, like a monk or a Taoist master.

Fear of unsettled spirits returning resulted in rules and regulations being implemented to ensure that all deaths were officially reported and funeral rites were performed accordingly. These applied to both royalty and commoners alike. The penalty for failure to report a death was exile or hard labour.

According to traditional Chinese literature, apart from improper burial rites, souls of the deceased could also return to haunt the living if they had unfinished business, unfulfilled vows, a desire to right a wrong, or just to visit.

The two parts of the soul that are said to return to cause havoc for the living are the ‘Po‘ and ‘Hun‘. Based on the history of Chinese writing, the character for Po 魄 “lunar brightness” appeared before Hun 魂 “soul; spirit”.

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Ancient art piece depicting the Hun and Po

The Po is the yin aspect of the soul, associated with darkness, water and earth. It is the animal nature of Man, whereby instincts and urges are the first to become apparent after birth. Conversely, the Hun is the yang aspect of the soul, associated with light, fire, and Heaven. It governs Man’s intelligence. At birth, it is weak but eventually strengthens as the ability to reason becomes more developed, especially after the age of six when education begins, and reaches full maturity at the age of 20. These two parts of the soul are the essence of what gives a person life. Hun (reason) governs Po (instinct) but Hun also needs Po to survive.

Stories of ghosts haunting their relatives, former residences, or appearing to strangers for help are all examples of Po hauntings, where the yin spirit is still attached to the earth because proper funeral rites were not observed to set it free. One of the best known stories of this type is about the ghost of a young girl who visited the home of some brothers. The spirit was so irritating that they caught it, put it in a bag, and threw it down a well.

The next night it came back, carrying the bag, and haunted them again. They stuffed it back into the bag, tied a rock to it, and threw it in the river. The next night, though, the little girl came back once again. This time, the brothers put her into a hollowed-out log, which they capped on each end, and set it adrift on the river. The spirit thanked them for a proper burial and never bothered them again.

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Ghost sightings were recorded as far back as 827 BCE during the era of King Xuan of Zhou. At the time, they were believed to look like oxen and horses.

Hun hauntings are different because Hun is not attached to the body like Po. Stories about spirit possessions, ghosts appearing as if they were still living, or ghosts taking revenge on the living are examples of Hun hauntings.

In one story, two friends, Gao and Liu, made a pact that whoever died first would return to tell the other what the afterlife would be like. Some months after Liu died, Gao heard a knock at his door one night. The voice of his friend requested that he douse the lamps and let him in so they could speak in the dark. As they were talking, Gao was disturbed by the smell of a rotting corpse. He later found that Liu’s Hun had possessed the body of a barbarian who had been dead for seven days.

In another tale, Marshal Li wanted to marry a young girl but was rejected by her mother. In a bid to win her over, Li vowed he would never marry if he could not marry her. He proved himself so devoted and persistent that the girl’s mother finally agreed to the marriage and he swore to be faithful forever. After a few years, the girl died.

Only a year after his wife’s death, Li arranged to marry someone else. Just before his marriage, as he was soaking in a bath, the Hun of his first wife appeared and reminded him of his promise that he would always remain faithful. She then sprinkled some herbs into his bath water and vanished. Li began to feel weak and became so bloated that he could not move. He died in the bathtub and when he was found, his bones and tendons had dissolved. This story serves as a lesson to fulfil promises made, not just to the living but also to the deceased. It also highlights the importance of observing the proper mourning period.

The words Po and Hun may be etymologically complex but in modern terms, they carry similar meanings to what we would generalise as Ghost or Gui (鬼).

 

Ghost Literature in the History of China

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The story of Kua Fu chasing the Sun (夸父追日) is used today to describe a person who fails to achieve his goals because he overestimates his abilities.

In China’s long history, almost every dynasty has its own ghost legends.

The oldest ghost literature is the Shan Hai Jing (山海经) or ‘Classic of Mountains and Seas’, a fable about pre-Qin Dynasty China and a collection of ancient fairytales. The exact author and date remains unknown but most sociologists in China think that it might have been authored by numerous writers between the Warring States period (475 BC – 221 BC) and the beginning of the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

As one of the oldest Chinese classics, it contains vivid and detailed descriptions of medicines, animals and geological features, enabling readers to catch a glimpse of ancient China as it was thousands of years ago. This classic also contains many fairytales, which are well-known even today. One of these stories is that of a giant named Kua Fu (夸父) who ran from East to West in hopes of chasing and catching the sun. He did not complete his mission as he finally died of extreme heat and exhaustion, and his club transformed into a forest.

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Nuwa Repairing the Wall of Heaven is a popular folktale among the Chinese.

Another famous story is about Jingwei (精卫), the daughter of Emperor Yandi (炎帝), who drowned in the East Sea. After her death, she was transformed into a bird who brought stones and small twigs over the sea every day in an attempt to fill it. The Shan Hai Jing also contains other famous stories such as Xing Tian Fighting Against the Supreme Divinity (刑天舞干戚) and Nuwa Repairing the Wall of Heaven (女娲补天).

Another famous Chinese ghost literature is Notes on Searching Deities (搜神記), a compilation of legends about ghosts and spirits. The author is believed to be Gan Bao (干宝), a historian living in the 4th century. It consists of 464 short stories, some of which are still known today. For instance, there is the story of a filial woman who was accused of killing her mother-in-law (who in fact committed suicide) and was subsequently sentenced to death. After she died, her blood miraculously flowed upwards (instead of downwards) as she had predicted before her death, thus exposing the injustice.

During the Tang Dynasty, many ghost stories emerged like the story of Meeting Ghosts One Night in Dongyang (东阳夜怪录). In this tale, a man who was travelling went to a temple to stay for the night. In the dark temple, he met several other people and chatted with them all night. When day broke, the man looked around and realised that the people with whom he had spoken were in fact animals that resided in the rundown temple – a donkey and a camel!

Another interesting story is the tale of The Governor of Nanke (南柯太守传). In this story, a drunk found himself in an unknown kingdom. There, he was bestowed great position and married the princess. In the end, the man woke up and realised that it was nothing but a dream. This story is so famous that it became an idiom “Nan Ke Yi Meng” (南柯一梦).

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The story of The Governor of Nanke tells of the dream of Chunyu Fen (淳于棼), a previously successful and rich officer in the army who offended his general and was dismissed.

During the Qing Dynasty(1644 – 1911), more ghost stories were published. One of them is Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio (聊斋志异). Written by Pu Songling, it is a collection of nearly 500 tales, mostly about the supernatural, where the ghosts are brave and honest while the humans are cowardly and greedy. Another book called He Dian (何典) tells of the legend of a ghost called Living Dead. Written in Wu dialect, the language is humorous although slightly vulgar.

With such a rich history, Chinese ghost literature continues to bring to life the culture and tradition of various Chinese dynasties in modern platforms such as movies and computer games.

 

Popular Chinese Ghosts

Here is a list of the more popular Chinese ghosts that most would have heard of or encountered before.

 

Shui Gui 水鬼 (Water Ghost)

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Shui Gui (Water Ghost)

A popular but particularly dangerous ghost is the Shui Gui, the spirit of someone who drowned and whose body was never recovered or accorded a proper burial. Shui Gui are believed to haunt the waters so that they can move on when they have found a replacement.

According to lore, a Shui Gui possesses and drowns its victim’s body so that the victim takes their place. The victim’s soul then haunts the waters to lure and drown the next victim. This vicious cycle of “luring and drowning” continues and many Chinese swear by talismans and amulets when going near water or swimming to protect them from Shui Gui.

Another legend tells of a Shui Gui that was passed down from one generation to another. It began with the Shui Gui of Huangbo River who wished to find someone to take his place. It created storms, tore nets and bored holes in boats, but the fishermen of Yichang withstood every test. One night, the Shui Gui climbed aboard the boat of a fisherman named Zhijian and hid in a corner as Zhijian prayed for a good catch. When the fisherman leaned over the side to haul in his nets, the ghost pushed him into the freezing water.

Zhijian lost consciousness. The ghost pulled his body to shore, smeared his face with river slime and placed the ghost tablet on his tongue to prepare Zhijian for the spirit world. Then, the Shui Gui appeared in the Underworld to speak to Yen Lo Wang, Emperor of Dead Souls.

“I have found someone to take my place,” he announced.

But Zhijian was not dead. When he was certain that the ghost was gone, he removed the tablet from his tongue and placed it in his pocket. Then, he hurried home and bolted the door. Meanwhile, Yen Lo Wang looked in the “Book of the Living and the Dying” and saw that Zhijian’s name had not been entered. “Go back and take your rightful place!” Yen Lo Wang told the ghost. “And if you do not retrieve your tablet, you will never leave the river.”

The Shui Gui returned and frantically searched the village for Zhijian. Finally, at midnight, he found the fisherman’s cottage. When Zhijian answered the door, the Shui Gui began to weep. “Please return my tablet or I am doomed!” Zhijian had a big heart, but he said, “I will return your tablet if you ensure that my nets are always full.”

Naturally, the ghost agreed to this and from that day on, Zhijian’s nets brimmed with fish. After a while, the Shui Gui began to appear to talk to Zhijian. Before long, they became friends and Zhijian would invite the Shui Gui to his home to share food and conversation.

One evening, the Shui Gui announced that he would be leaving his friend.

“I saw an old woman walking along the riverbank. With one push, she will fall in and drown, and I shall change my fate. Sorry to say farewell.”

But Zhijian cried,

“Wait! You must not kill an innocent woman. Besides, what would I do without your help?”

The ghost thought a while and finally agreed to stay on for another three years without harming anyone. For the next three years, no one drowned in Huangbo River. The years passed swiftly and one evening, the Shui Gui told Zhijian that the next time he had a chance, he would pull someone into the river. “I cannot bear to live in the water forever.” He was desperate.

The next day, Zhijian noticed a young boy skipping along the riverbank. He quickly dropped his nets and rowed to the boy. “Go home. Your mother needs you now!” The boy went home right away. That night, the ghost appeared at Zhijian’s door shaking with rage. Again, Zhijian pacified the Shui Gui and persuaded him to not harm for another three years. Again, the Shui Gui agreed to wait.

Three more years passed, but one night the ghost announced the time had come.

“I care for you, friend, but I must help myself. There is a woman who plans to kill herself by throwing herself into the river. I will not stop her.”

Zhijian promised not to interfere but the next morning when he went down to the river, he was just in time to see a woman diving into the freezing water. He could not help himself and dived in after her, carrying her to safety. From a distance, the Shui Gui was watching and waiting for fate to take its course. But when he saw that the woman did not die, he did not rage. He told Zhijian he understood.

Now Yen Lo Wang, the Emperor of Dead Souls, had been watching and noticed the kindness and generosity of the Shui Gui of Huangbo River. He decided to recommend him for a promotion to the Jade Emperor. That evening, as the Shui Gui rose from the river, the Jade Emperor’s guards stopped him, saying that he would be appointed to a post at the Ch’eng Huang Temple and that he must come right away.

“May I invite my friend to the ceremony?” the Shui Gui asked, and the guards agreed. But when the Shui Gui reached Zhijian’s house, his friend was not there. So he left an invitation to the temple.

When Zhijian found the invitation, he hurried to the temple but when he arrived, the place was deserted. A fierce wind was blowing and the fisherman, tired from his long day of work and the journey, decided to take a nap while waiting for the Shui Gui. In Zhijian’s dream, he saw the Shui Gui dressed in the robes of Ch’eng Huang. His friend placed a bag of coins on the ground and bowed to the fisherman.

“You saved me from killing and I thank you, my friend. Though we shall never see each other again, I will always watch over you.”

When Zhijian woke, he found a bag of gold beside him.

 

Er Gui 饿鬼 (Hungry Ghost)

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Er Gui (Hungry Ghost)

One of the most famous Chinese ghosts is the Er Gui. According to the Buddhist teachings, hungry ghosts are the spirits of people who always wanted more than they had, never grateful with what they were given, and thus, cannot find peace in the afterlife any more than they could when they were alive. They are often depicted as beings with enormous stomachs, tiny mouths and long thin necks.

According to legend, no amount of food can fulfil their hunger. Er Gui would appear to living people to ask for food and, if they were not satisfied, they would curse the person, bringing disaster to their homes and loved ones. The term “hungry ghosts” normally applies to this type of spirit but all ghosts are thought to be hungry in the afterlife. Hence, rituals were developed and performed to keep them “fed” and happy. The annual Hungry Ghost Festival is one of the ways to keep the hungry ghosts appeased.

 

Hua Pi 画皮 (Ghost of the Painted Skin

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Many movies are based on the famous gruesome tale of the Hua Pi

Hua Pi is part of ‘Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio‘, the collection of supernatural tales by Pu Songling. In this creepy and gruesome tale, a scholar named Wang met a homeless girl who claimed to be an abused concubine. Captivated by her beauty and feeling pity for her, Wang agreed to let her stay in his home temporarily. He could not resist her feminine charms and he took her as his mistress, much to the dismay of his wife, Chen.

Later at the marketplace, a Taoist priest told Wang that an evil spirit had possessed him. Wang did not believe the priest and dismissed his claims. When he returned home, Wang made a startling discovery − his mistress was actually a “green-faced monster, a ghoul with great jagged teeth like a saw.” All this while, she had been wearing a mask made of human skin, on which her attractive features were “painted”.

Petrified, he begged the Taoist priest for help. The priest agreed but out of compassion for the ghost, he only offered Wang a charm meant to ward off ghosts and demons. This charm failed to ward off the Hua Pi. Instead, she became furious and ripped Wang’s heart out. Chen reported this to the priest who subdued the spirit, removed the “Painted Skin” and stored it away. His spouse, Chen, through much hard work, later successfully revived Wang.

 

Jiangshi 僵尸 (Vampires)

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Jiang Shi in the movies

Translated as “stiff body”, the Jiang Shi is a type of zombie who steals the life force of a person. The Jiang Shi is so stiff that it cannot bend its limbs or body, and moves around by hopping with its arms outstretched for stability. The Jiang Shi is usually depicted wearing a Chinese-style robe and a tall hat, typical of a Qing Dynasty official, and with a paper “sealing spell” talisman stuck to its forehead.

Jiang Shi are believed to have greenish-white skin. One theory states that the greenish complexion is due to the fungus that grows on corpses. This Chinese vampire is also believed to have long flowing white hair and may behave like an animal.

In the traditional sense, Jiang Shi feed solely on the “qi” (life force) of a living person for sustenance and power. However, due to influences from Western vampire stories, the bloodsucking aspect was introduced to this Chinese ghost character in the modern day version.

 

Nu Gui 女鬼 (Female Ghost)

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A typical Nu Gui looks beautiful and seductive

The Nu Gui is a vengeful long-haired female ghost in a white dress. In Chinese folklore, this ghost is the spirit of a woman who committed suicide while wearing a red dress. Traditionally, the colour red symbolises anger and vengeance. It is believed that she experienced some form of injustice when she was alive, such as being jilted or sexually abused and thus is returning to seek revenge.

Some ancient folktales tell of beautiful female ghosts who seduce men and suck their yang essence, sometimes killing them. This type of female ghost is similar to its Western counterpart, the succubus.

 

Yuan Gui 冤鬼 (Vengeful Ghost)

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The Yuan Gui is dangerous and has the ability to kill and inflict tremendous pain.

Yuan Gui or vengeful ghosts are spirits of people who return from the afterlife to avenge their cruel or wrongful deaths. Such ghosts are believed to have existed in China as early as the Zhou Dynasty (1046 BC– 256 BC) and were recorded in the historical text Zuo Zhuan (左傳).

Due to the circumstances of their deaths, these ghosts can neither rest in peace nor take a rebirth. These depressed and restless spirits roam the world of the living, constantly seeking retribution for their unjust deaths.

In some tales, Yuan Gui approach the living in an attempt to complete the unfinished business that prevents them from moving on. Others try to connect with the living to help them find clues or pieces of evidence which could provide evidence of their wrongful deaths, thus helping the Yuan Gui find closure to finally be able to move on.

 

You Hun Ye Gui 游魂野鬼 (Wandering Spirits)

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You Hun Ye Gui experience suffering no matter where they are

You Hun Ye Gui, literally meaning “wandering souls and wild ghosts”, refers to wandering spirits of the dead. It is said that these ghosts have no living relatives or resting places, hence their need to roam the world of the living.

During the Seventh Lunar Month or Hungry Ghost Festival, ghosts are released from the Underworld into the world of the living. Such spirits include vengeful ghosts seeking retribution for their wrongful deaths (Yuan Gui), hungry ghosts (Er Gui) and playful spirits that could cause trouble during that period. Some could lose their way and are unable to return to the Underworld in time. So, they continue to roam the world of the living even after the Seventh Lunar Month.

Gu Hun Ye Gui 孤魂野鬼 which means “lonely souls and wild ghosts” also describes these ghosts, as it refers to the homeless or those who wander around aimlessly.

 

Wutou Gui 无头鬼 (Headless Ghost)

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The Wutou Gui sometimes approaches people in hopes of finding its head

Wutou Gui are headless ghosts who roam the living realm aimlessly. They are spirits of people who were killed through decapitation due to various causes (e.g. execution, accidents, etc).

In some tales, the Wutou Gui approaches people at night and asks them where its head is. The Wutou Gui is also sometimes depicted as carrying its head at its side.

 

Diaosi Gui 吊死鬼 (Hanged Ghost)

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Diaosi Gui

Fairly common in Chinese folklore, Diaosi Gui are the spirits of people who either committed suicide or are victims of execution. They are said to haunt the location where they died.

According to legend, they appear as corpses with long red tongues hanging out of their mouths and will try to convince passers-by to join them in the afterlife.

 

Gu Huo Niao 姑穫鳥

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A traditional painting of Gu Huo Niao

A Gu Huo Niao is a woman who died during childbirth, subsequently becoming a creature with shape shifting abilities alternating between bird and woman. Due to grief from her grim pregnancy, this bird-woman creature craves for infants, especially males.

Gu Huo Niao is known for stealing male infants to make up for her emotional loss. It is said that those with newborn sons should not leave the baby clothes to dry outside at night. Otherwise, a Gu Huo Niao could find them and mark them with drops of her blood. If a baby wears these clothes, he will die and his spirit will go to the Gu Huo Niao.

 

Ghosts of Deceased Animals

Human beings are not the only creatures with souls that can return from beyond the grave. It is believed that dogs, cats and other animal souls can come back to seek retribution as well.

In one famous story, a man named Coffin Head Li was a bully who loved to kill cats and dogs. One day, two men approached Coffin Head Li and identified themselves as Hell Guards. They informed him that a case had been made against him in the afterlife by the souls of 460 cats and dogs. Coffin Head Li was subsequently found guilty and taken away to face judgement in the unseen world.

 

Ghostly Celebrations

Ghosts and spirits are so deeply entrenched in Chinese culture that practices and rituals were developed to protect people from them. As “Chinese ghost culture” is based on moral admonition in the afterlife, the best way is to live a life of virtue. This is one of the reasons why ghost stories are told to children, to teach them moral values and encourage them to be kind and courteous to each other.

For instance, if one does not want to be killed by a Nu Gui, one should not abuse women. If one goes swimming, one should be careful to avoid drowning and becoming a Shui Gui. Proper respect should be given to one’s elders, superiors and ancestors so that they will not feel wronged after death. One should always keep one’s promises. Most importantly, proper burial practices must always be observed, no matter how much cost or effort is required.

 

Qing Ming Festival (Tomb Sweeping Day)

A tradition still observed in China today is Tomb Sweeping Day during the Qing Ming Festival, which usually falls around April 5 each year. Even if one has neglected the graves of one’s parents, relatives or friends all year round, one must, at least, tend to the ancestors’ graves on Tomb Sweeping Day and pay one’s respects.

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It is common practice for descendants of the deceased to bring flowers and offerings to pay their respects to their ancestors during the Qing Ming Festival

 

Hungry Ghost Festival

The Ghost Festival is the largest festival observed for ghosts in Chinese culture. This celebration, also known as The Hungry Ghost Festival, appeases the souls of the dead so that they will not bother the living during the time that the barrier between the land of the dead and living is “temporarily lifted”. It is celebrated on the 15th day of the 7th Lunar Month in China.

During the Festival, people prepare food in homes and in public places to feed the hungry ghosts and spirits. It is common to see altars piled with fresh fruit and sweet cakes in city streets and town squares. Incense is also burned in front of homes in remembrance of one’s ancestors and to give a pleasing scent to the spirits as they walk by. Many shops in towns, and even cities, will be closed during the festival so that shoppers will not disturb the ghosts.

There is a long list of taboos to keep in mind during the Hungry Ghost Month, especially during the festival.

  • One should not sit in the front row at the theatre because those seats are reserved for ghosts and they will be offended if their seats are taken by the living.
  • One should not place one’s shoes or sandals facing the bed because it is considered an invitation for ghosts to sleep with the person.
  • One should not stay out too late at night or a ghost may follow one home.
  • One should not go swimming because there are more Shui Gui during this period.
  • One should avoid any kind of construction or renovation because the noise bothers the ghosts.
  • One should not wear high heels as spirits are believed to be irritated by the sounds of clicking high heels and may possess the wearer.
  • One should not hang clothes out to dry towards the evening because ghosts will try them on. This is believed to bring bad luck to the wearer.
  • One should not urinate outdoors without seeking permission first because one might accidentally urinate on ghosts and anger them.
  • One should not leave umbrellas open on one’s porch because a ghost might decide to rest under it and then, take up residence.

These traditions have a very long history and were observed as much as possible, even during the time when religion and religious practices were banned in China (c. 1949 – 1979 CE).

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To this day, people still continue the tradition of making elaborate offering during the Hungry Ghost Festival.

As the festival approaches its end, people light small lotus lanterns placed on paper boats to be sent off in lakes or rivers. The lanterns are a message to inform ghosts that their visiting time is over and they have to return to the Underworld. The ghosts are believed to be attracted by the lanterns and will follow them back home to the afterlife. When a lantern goes out, it is a sign that the ghost following it has reached the other side and is at peace.

 

Ghost Marriage

Ancestor veneration in a patriarchal family structure has been at the root of Chinese cultural practices for thousands of years. The Chinese believe that the afterlife or netherworld is a place similar to the world of the living, where the dead can receive gifts and offerings sent by family members. Tablets representing the deceased are placed on family altars for ritual worship and offerings. It is believed that if these rituals are not carried out and continued, ancestors will become angry and can create havoc for their descendants.

Under the Chinese patriarchal family system, a woman was not considered part of her biological family. Upon marriage, she would be accepted into her husband’s family and after death, she would be honoured on her husband’s family altar. If a woman was divorced, she would no longer be considered as part of her husband’s family. Due to this, unmarried and childless women were believed to become Gu Hun Ye Gui 孤魂野鬼, as they had no family or descendants to honour them after they passed on.

In extreme cases, some women were not even allowed to die in their father’s homes. Their ancestral tablet would be placed outside or in a community shrine. However, sons who died before marriage would still be honoured on the family shrine. If a man were to remarry after his first wife had died, his current wife would need to honour his deceased wife.

Ghost marriage is a pragmatic solution to the issues arising for the deceased due to complex Chinese traditions that are steeped in filial piety.

Thus, the Chinese adopted ‘ghost marriage’ as a pragmatic solution to the issues arising for the deceased due to complex Chinese traditions that are steeped in filial piety. By marrying off the ghosts of the deceased, lonely or hungry ghosts could be prevented. Historically, ghost marriages were usually performed between a dead man and a dead woman. There are also instances of a living groom marrying a ghost bride, and in less common circumstances, a living bride marrying a ghost groom. Ghost marriage practices have been recorded as early as the Zhou Dynasty.

As ghost marriage is based on Chinese folk religion, Confucian officials with opposing beliefs made several attempts to ban it. However, the ban did not last. There are many written records of royal ghost marriages during the Tang Dynasty, leading scholars to believe that even more ghost marriages occurred amongst the commoners. The Ming and Qing Dynasties saw a revival of folk practices, and ghost marriage was reported to be popular once again.

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Ghost marriage can occur between a deceased man and a deceased woman, a living groom and ghost bride, or in less common circumstances, a living bride and ghost groom.

Going beyond mainland China, research in the mid 1950s revealed that ghost marriage services were available from some Taoist priests in Singapore, and such marriages were frequently performed in local temples. Though not nearly as popular as it was in the past, the occasional ghost marriage still happens today.

 

Chinese Ghost Myths of Today

Without a doubt, Chinese ghost culture is not as strong as it used to be as many Western elements have been infused into it. Despite a decrease in rituals and rites for appeasing Chinese ghosts, several notable myths are still widely circulated, not just in China but also in Chinese communities all over the world.

The common myths are:

  • When a pregnant woman tries to kill herself but survives, she will be able to see ghosts. It is believed that spirits wait close to pregnant women to enter the body of newborn infants. Having attempted suicide, she would be “gifted” with the power of extra sight and would most likely be haunted by the spirit who was to be her child.
  • Dogs are known to be very sensitive to ghosts. It is believed that placing dog tears or cemetery mud onto one’s eyes will grant the ability to see ghosts.
  • Opening an umbrella indoors is an open invitation for ghosts to drop by and take residence. This act is most unwelcome by many Chinese families.
  • Wearing a hat that covers both eyebrows will cause one to find a haunted place.
  • Mirrors can reflect both humans and ghosts, and ghosts usually do not tolerate vanity. So, combing one’s hair in front of a mirror at midnight is believed to give one the ability to see the unseen.
  • Going to a graveyard at dusk and looking through one’s legs is said to be a sign of disrespect. By doing this, one will be able to see the dead.
  • The burning of joss sticks at graveyards is a sign of respect. To see ghosts, one can take a lit joss stick from a grave, throw it on the ground and then rub the ashes on oneself. This is the ultimate sign of disrespect which will anger the dead, and they will definitely appear to the person who is guilty of such disrespect.
  • Use an Ouija board. This is used to summon spirits and communicate with the dead.
  • A cornea transplant from a dead person is said to grant one the ability to see ghosts.

 

Chinese Ghosts in Malaysia Today

Over the passage of time, as the Chinese settled throughout Southeast Asia, Chinese ghost beliefs have become as diverse as the cultures of the countries they settled in. Similarly in Malaysia, Chinese ghost stories have retained their essence but are infused with local traditions .

 

Ba Jiao Gui 芭蕉鬼

Ba Jiao Gui 芭蕉鬼 which means “Banana Ghost” is a female ghost who lives in banana trees. She appears wailing under the tree at night, sometimes carrying a baby. In Malaysian folklore, greedy people would ask the Ba Jiao Gui for lucky numbers in hopes of winning a fortune.

CG27 (1)

Ba Jiao Gui is a ghost who lives in a banana tree

There is a unique way to lure the Ba Jiao Gui into agreeing to this deal. First, tie a red string around the tree trunk and attach the other end of the string to the bed. Then, stick some sharp needles into the tree. At night, the Ba Jiao Gui will appear and beg the person to set her free. In return, she will provide a set of winning numbers.

If the person does not fulfil their promise to set the Ba Jiao Gui free after winning, he/she will meet a horrible death. This ghost is similar to the Pontianak in Malay folklore.

 

Tambun Inn

One of the most well-known local ghost stories occurred in the infamous Tambun Inn, which is one of the most haunted places in the whole of Malaysia.

CG24 (1)

Tambun Inn was a popular hotel in the 1970s in Ipoh. It still exists today as an abandoned building.

 

Genting Highlands

There are many documented accounts of ghosts wandering the hotels, lights switching on and off, eerie whispers as well as shouts and screams from unknown entities.

CG25 (1)

Genting Highlands remains a popular tourist destination with locals and foreigners even though tales of alleged hauntings are plentiful

 

Buddhist Protection Against Ghosts

The most popular religions in Chinese communities – Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism – each have their own unique methods for countering spirits and ghostly disturbances.

In Buddhism, the simplest method of protection is to Take Refuge in the Three Jewels. Taking Refuge means developing faith in the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. When one takes refuge in the Buddha, practises the Dharma and supports the Sangha, one is protected from many different types of spirit.

Nevertheless, there are cases where people still have the karma to experience spirit disturbances, although they have taken refuge in the Three Jewels. This means that additional protection, usually in the form of prayer or ritual, is required.

Tibetan Buddhism is one of the most powerful to counter all forms of ghostly and spirit disturbances.

Those who are disturbed by spirits or ghosts touching or pressing down on them, especially while they are sleeping, can hang a wrathful image of Dukkar above their beds. They can also do Dukkar’s practice daily or have a Dukkar Puja done for them.

Those who are adversely affected by seeing or hearing ghosts can do Sengdongma’s practice daily. They can also have a Sengdongma Puja done for them to help counter this type of disturbance.

CG28 (1)

Trakze or Karma Shugden is the most wrathful form of Dorje Shugden and is supremely effective to counter negative disturbances

For very severe cases, Trakze’s practice and puja are recommended. Trakze also offers very effective protection against black magic.

Another effective form of protection is the Tibetan Ruel. These are extremely effective against persistent harm caused by spirits, curses and black magic and offer powerful protection against the most malevolent spells.

 

Conclusion

Whether one believes in the existence of ghosts or otherwise, it is always good to be mindful of customs and beliefs. Just because one cannot see ghosts does not mean they do not exist. When dealing with such supernatural entities, one should not be afraid but treat them with compassion. As Buddhists, we can employ compassionate methods, such as performing pujas and making offerings, to generate merits that can be dedicated to these ghosts and wandering spirits to help them get out of their current cycle of existence.

 

Note: All articles published on the blog are conceptualised, approved and edited by H.E. the 25th Tsem Rinpoche. For further assistance and any urgent enquiries, please write in to mail@tsemladrang.com.

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  1. Aldan Chan on Sep 27, 2017 at 1:49 pm

    Thank you for sharing this interesting yet spine chilling article. It is interesting that there are many types of ghosts in China. The scariest post I`ve read on the blog. Thank you for sharing._^_

  2. Liang Jing on Sep 10, 2017 at 10:33 pm

    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing this article. I learnt some type of ghost I did know before. Ghost have good and evil, we do not know which ghost is good and witch ghost is evil. So, we better not to make any connection or conversation with them.

  3. Cc on Sep 4, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    Spirits and ghost are everywhere day and night. They need help just like humans. It encourage us to do more dharma and having compassion by dedicate to them daily as they are in pain and suffer more than human.

  4. Anne Ong on Aug 14, 2017 at 10:07 pm

    Didn’t know there are so many types of ghosts. Very interesting to read up and know more. Chinese ghosts has always been a folklore and beliefs that was passed down from generations to generations. I don’t really fancy ghosts stories,but it’s good to read up for knowledge.Thank you Rinpoche and blog tem for this write up._/\_

  5. Stella Cheang on Aug 7, 2017 at 11:22 pm

    Chinese Ghosts is an interesting topic because we grew up in a culture submerged in the fear of the unseen beings. We were taught from young that if we are disobedient then the formidable “ah woo” (means ghost to the kids) will come and catch us to take us to a dark place. It is exactly this fear that aid the parents in teaching morale to children when schools and medias were (still are) clueless how to do so.

    As we grew older, we realised that the Chinese Ghosts culture is an extention of a life after death, which none of us can avoid. Therefore, the Chinese Ghosts culture become the moral admonition in the after death. Especially for the crimes committed in this lifetime that escape punishment. It has the effect of exhortation and remonstration for common people and also a sense of relief to know that bad deeds will not go unpunished.

    As we learn about Buddhism and understand the effect of cause and effect, or Karma, we will understand that the Chinese Ghosts culture is a part of the law of Karma. Chinese Ghosts is one of the six realms where we will take rebirth according to the deeds we carried out through out our lifetime. Unfortunately, there is no quick way to get out of it except learning the Dharma and devoting ourselves to the Three Principal Paths.

  6. Colin Tan on Aug 1, 2017 at 5:08 pm

    We will hear lots of Chinese ghost stories or movies especially near the “hungry ghost festival” during lunar calendar. Most of us might treat ghost stories as some kind of entertainment, but some might believe in it and some might treat it as folklore. Ghost stories are told to convince that there is something beyond the living realm that is not yet understood. While most people believe that after death, there is a small percentage of spirit get “stuck” and still hanging on the Earth plane. If the spirit can let go, discard all material belongings, resolve all unfinished issues, and move on, then the spirit will be ready for the reincarnation. Therefore letting go of the past and take only the memories, lessons and spiritual connection with others are the purpose in this life time.

    There is value in the telling of ghost stories regardless of whether you perceive them as folklore or fact; it’s to practice to remain still and silent as well as showing care and reverence when encountering an entity from the afterlife. Of course these Chinses ghost stories were being told to children from generation to generation, to teach them moral values and encourage them to be kind, compassionate and courteous to each other even to entity from different worlds. Hence these stories are moral stories besides being seen as entertaining creative scripts.

  7. William Chua on Jul 28, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    This is such an interesting read. Chinese ghosts has always been a folklore and beliefs that was passed down from generations to generations. It soon became a tradition and part of the Chinese culture that there’s another world after death. As kids, we were told to behave so that ghosts will not disturb us. It doesn’t help when there are lots of movies depicting ghosts that are revengeful and sill hurt people.

    As a Buddhist now, we do believe in the existence of ghosts and the unseen beings. However,ther are in those realms because of their karma. The way out of the realm is to accumulate merits either by themselves or by dedication from others. Buddhists always dedicate merits to all beings to lessen sufferings and to be enlightened, hence this will help the ghosts to be reborn into higher realms.

    The conclusion sums it up: “Whether one believes in the existence of ghosts or otherwise, it is always good to be mindful of customs and beliefs. Just because one cannot see ghosts does not mean they do not exist. When dealing with such supernatural entities, one should not be afraid but treat them with compassion. As Buddhists, we can employ compassionate methods, such as performing pujas and making offerings, to generate merits that can be dedicated to these ghosts and wandering spirits to help them get out of their current cycle of existence.”

  8. Pastor Chia on Jul 27, 2017 at 8:32 am

    Since as the child, i use to heard different type of ghost stories around neigbordhood and scary me a lot. When i grow up older in teenage, i also have experince seeing spirit and get disturbing. I was so scar even refuse watching all kind of horor movies.

    I glad to studying buddhism and get to know the cause to be born as the spirit or ghosts. This knowleadge make me feel more about their suffering being born as the spirit, how lonely they are and live for hunred snd thousand and years.

    As i learn more about buddhism, i also interesting to learn more about puja, which the holy prayer can help to spirit to liberate their suffering and help them go for new rebirth. In Kechara, we have many puja like durkar puja, medicine buddha puja and protector puja can help for those get disturbing by spirit problem and the same time help to liberate spirit to their next rebirth.

  9. Mingwen on Jul 27, 2017 at 7:30 am

    As a Malaysian Chinese, all these names of ghosts are not new to me, I ve been watching them in the Hongkong movies since young. I’ve never seen one, I’ll not wish to do so. Somebody want to see them because they are not sure if they really exist. Hence, somebody will try all sort of method to tap into the negative emerges. I don’t think I need to see one to believe they are here with us. Sometimes, we can just hear or feel them accidentally. No matter what, we should respect to one’s belief and culture, to keep peace and keep trouble away.

    There are more interesting topics that are waiting for us to explore at

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/category/science-mysteries

  10. Pastor Antoinette on Jul 27, 2017 at 6:21 am

    Before learning about Buddhism, I did not believe that ghosts exist. Yet, because I have learned about the six realms in Buddhism, I know that they are real.

    Similar to the waterghost, in my country, we tell the children to keep away from water like lakes, rives and so on, if not the “Kropeman” will drag them into the water. But the “Kropeman” is not seen as a ghost, it is more to protect the children from the danger of drowning.

    I think it is important to be aware about the many ghosts and to know that they are around where ever we are. They have to live very long, about 2000 years, and they are very lonely. So it is better to always be respectful to them.

  11. Justin Cheah on Jul 27, 2017 at 2:41 am

    I am not a big fan of ghost movies or stories partly due to the fact that it’s not particularly my interest and knowing that it is fake and most of the time the type of productions are far from being admired. I do believe existence of ghosts. I have to, for I do believe there are gods and Buddha’s; and if there are gods and Buddha’s whom I do make offerings to then why there should not be ghosts. We are living in this universe big enough for our minds to explore to know that we are never alone in this planet.

  12. June Kang on Jul 27, 2017 at 1:49 am

    大部份的人对鬼都產生恐惧感,人類對鬼的恐懼应源於對未知的恐懼。如果今天你真的遇到可爱善良的鬼,你还会害怕鬼?

    今天如果我告訴你站在你前面这位可爱的先生是杀人和吃人肉,大部份的人都不会相信, 因没看过他吃人肉,可是你也没看过鬼呀!为什么耍怕鬼,因为我们看过鬼戏,听过鬼故事, 都是很恐怖的。

    所以说我们所听所看都会影响我们的想法而后我们的人生, 唯有佛法可以让我们认知自己的无知。

  13. Andrea Lai on Jul 26, 2017 at 11:38 pm

    Personally I don’t fancy much of ghostly or horrible movies firstly might be I experienced spirits disturbances when I was toddler and it gives me quite big impact of rejection but as I grew older, I’m more calm and strong. I have trained myself to be brave and fearless in the dark.

    Living in a multi-culture community, I have heard many stories of ghosts from different races since my primary, from school to work place. I remembered once, it I was during in my secondary, where there was a sudden game trend of coin spirit among my school mates. It was quite scary for girls our age to engage such dangerous games and fortunately it stops after been warned and banned by teachers (Of course!)

    Overall, ghosts or spirits are pity soul that needed blessings and seek for better rebirth. It was due to their unsettled business and attachment to the earth. Therefore, we should be more compassionate to help them instead of harming them.

  14. Eric kksiow on Jul 26, 2017 at 11:37 pm

    I think at my age of 8 – 9 years old, i am watched a lot of Chinese Ghost Movies and Jiangshi 僵尸 (Vampires) movies. At that time i am really scared after watching of all the ” Movies “.

    From young age till today i am still wanted to know more about Jiangshi 僵尸 (Vampires) and Western Vampires, In ancient Chinese tradition, a Taoism Master can control a Jiangshi 僵尸, why? Long long time ago in China, where got car or airplane lah, the only transport in China is Horse, Donkey or by walk, at that time if i want to travel from Beijing to Nanjing, i think i need to spend maybe a month or more to arrive the destination. Let’s talk about the point : If someone born at Beijing and his working in Nanjing, all of the sudden the person passed away in Nanjing ( In Chinese tradition, if we died at other countries or states, our body must send back to the place that we born ) the best part is the Taoism Master can control the Jiangshi 僵尸 and send ” them ” back to their hometown safely. That’s really amazed me..!!

    Let’s talk about Ghosts, again.. If i have the ability, i’ll definitely will send all of ” them ” to Buddha’s land and study Dharma. As a Buddhist, what can we do? After the puja, sadhana and even Dharma sharing session finish, we can dedicate all the merits to ” them ” and the other 5 realms too.

    Eastern Vampires & Western Vampires Movie link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIizFIl-jOA

  15. Pastor Henry Ooi on Jul 26, 2017 at 10:56 pm

    It is common among the Malaysian Chinese community and our fellow Malaysians of other races and religious beliefs to talk about stories of ghosts to one another. Such stories may be from personal experiences or heard of from another party. It is an interesting topic to talk of and a great ice breaker especially if one is among people whom they just met. The existence of ghosts, spirits or whatever they are labelled in different languages, are best not be scorned at and made fun of just because some people cannot see them. It is best to respect and to treat them as we would of everything else in nature.

  16. Pastor Albert on Jul 26, 2017 at 10:49 pm

    A very interesting read I have today , Most of the ghost stories are so familiar as I’m growing up, I’m hearing all these different types of existence of the ghosts, like Er Gui, Shui Gui, Jiangshi, Gu Hen Ye Gui, ming hun, and many more.

    When I was young, I heard especially after died and when about crossing the Nai He Bridge, then we will drink a bowl of Mengpo soup and all that we have done in our life will be forgotten, then we will take rebirth into next life within this 6 realms, at the end of the path after the nai he bridge, there are 6 pots that lead to the 6 realms, so if you did a lot of bad things, the Ghost guardian will push you into the hell pot, and vice versa. So during when I was a kid, I alrdy start planning that after I died, how do I avoid from drinking the Mengpo soup and when I reached the end of the path, how to trick the ghost guardian and jump into the God realm or human realm for my next rebirth (hehe, side effect from too much TVB). After grown up, I noticed how naïve my plan was. Haha…

    Today we have a group discussion inside Kechara Forest Retreat about this topic, it is very wonderful when everyone shared what they heard since young and the ghost story from different country and cultures. Ghost is real and they do exist, and ghost do suffered a lot too, hence, learning and practicing Dharma is so important so that we do not take rebirth in the ghost realm. Thank you everyone for such wonderful sharing session.

  17. nicholas on Jul 26, 2017 at 10:47 pm

    I personally believe in ghost and spirit and they are everywhere. As mentioned in the article these being can be harmful. It’s good for us to take refuge to the 3 jewels and do protector practice. For this being able to disturb is due to our karma. So it’s good to do dharma work or purification practice to purify our karma before it’s too late.

    What also important here is that these being has feeling too and we should always be respectful.

  18. pammie yap on Jul 26, 2017 at 10:39 pm

    When I was younger, I have always feared the 7th month of the Chinese calendar. My mum will always make sure that we stay home after dark and not wander around. I don’t know if its my imagination but I feel that during the 7th month, there are more accidents than other months because I saw quite a number of accidents happen then.

    I love to watch the Chinese horror movies. I like it because they are much different than the western ones, not so ‘boring’. Especially the vampire themed ones, hopping around, sucking blood and possess ‘superpower’ to kill their victims.

    What I especially like is that in the Tibetan Buddhism tradition, there are ways to protect and counter off disturbances. I have heard of how personal practice or Pujas by Kechara House help those who have/had problems with disturbances and even black magic.

    For those who are interested, you may want to join us in Kechara Forest Retreat for the following event which is coming up very soon http://retreat.kechara.com/news/ullambana-the-original-hungry-ghost-festival/ to do dedications.

  19. Paul Yap on Jul 25, 2017 at 10:30 pm

    I grew up with reading all the ghost stories that was mentioned in this article. I always found these stories are quite real. The 6 realms that have been taught by Buddha, especially the hungry ghost and hell realm are very similar to the Chinese folklore. As the “Hungry Ghost Festival” is approaching, many people at these times will do prayers at the temple to seek protections against the evil spirits. It’s important that we make connection to the Enlightened Dharma Protectors to seek for protection. As a Buddhist, we should only take refuge from the Enlightened One, i.e. the Buddha.

  20. Fong on Jul 25, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    Tales of ghosts or other worldly apparitions are always scary. But, after meeting Buddhism and Rinpoche, I have learnt to practice compassion for all including beings of other realms.

    Some of these stories remind of the stories told to me by elders of the village where I grew up. It also brings back memories of stories told by an old lady which I now know to be very Buddhist in nature. And, I remember clearly now how the village was amazed when she passed away sitting in a lotus position dressed in fresh new clothes. How that was the talk for months. At that time, I was just curious but did not know the significance. Now, I regret not getting to know her better.

  21. Datuk May on Jul 24, 2017 at 3:28 pm

    The best way to combat fear is knowledge. This article is very educational for those who believe or seen GHOSTS and also for those who do not believe to be mindful.

    Personally, I believe the realm of another form of life exists, the irony is the dead lives on in another form with their original and currently our space!!!! Therefore being a Tibetan Vajrayana, and on my Guru’s teachings, I have taken refuge with my Guru and the 3 jewels. Also I practise the King Protector Dorje Shugden. Now is for me to be mindful and I believe I shall be fine under any circumstances that a ghost may appear in my face or space. Now not only I have the protection but also know what needs to be done to appease the ghost.

    The story of the Shui Gui and his relationship with a fisherman, Zhijian has a big impact on me. The fact that both these two beings practised compassion, all went well and both were rewarded accordingly within their own realm of being.

    Shui Gui was lifted out of the Ghost Realm and the fisherman with material wealth. This is a beautiful story of how “Compassion conquers all”.

    As always, thank you, H.E. the 25th Tsem Rinpoche, for this encyclopedia of education, information and knowledge. Tsemrinpoche.com

  22. Samfoonheei on Jul 23, 2017 at 10:03 am

    Chinese folklore features a rich variety of ghosts, monsters, and other supernatural creatures. According to traditional beliefs a ghost is the spirit form of a person .There are many folk beliefs and taboos surrounding during the 7th month of the Chinese calendar.Thats where the hell gate open recording to their beliefs.Traditional Chinese culture attached great importance to Ancestral Ghosts and the need to have descendants who would continue to honour them.
    Each faith have their own views of it.Ghosts have played a very important role in Chinese beliefs for many thousands of years, and for many Chinese they still do.
    I always believe when we do not disturb them,they do no harm to us and we are protected by each individual beliefs.As long as we are mindful of customs and beliefs.
    what we can do to help those wandering spirits is by each doing own customs of compassionate way.
    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing these comprehensive explanation,insight post which helps us to understand better.

  23. XIAO QIAN on Jul 22, 2017 at 11:18 pm

    I think ghost stories teach people how to be a good person. In many many chinese ghost stories, there are good ghost and bad ghosts. just like good people and bad people. If you dont do wrong thing in your life, then no need to be afraid of any ghosts. 不做亏心事,不怕鬼敲门😄

    • Stella Cheang on Jul 23, 2017 at 8:32 pm

      Hi Xiao Qian,
      You are absolutely right to say that 不做亏心事,不怕鬼敲门. In another words, if we do not have the karmic affinity with the spirit, we will not be disturbed. 🙂

  24. Martin Yeoh on Jul 22, 2017 at 9:52 am

    They do exist and some of my family members including me do encounter it before. But for now I had Dorje Shugden in my heart, I think it should keep them at bay. Lolz

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Tsem Tulku Rinpoche

My name is Tsem Rinpoche and I am a Buddhist monk and teacher. I have a wide range of interests just like anyone else. Ever since I was a young child growing up in America, I have had a huge interest in the paranormal. I have always loved this subject. I love all things magical and mysterious – Tibet, Bigfoot, Loch Ness, Findhorn, UFO, Nazca lines, Spirits, Salem, Easter Island, Dowsing, Greek Gods, Hindu Gods, Yogis, Himalayas, Shambala, Aura, Divinations, Delphic Oracles, Tibetan Oracles, Nature Spirits, Pan, Shamans and more.

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The state of West Virginia in the United States has a dark reputation for being one of the most haunted places in the country, with hundreds of sightings of...

The Curse of Otzi, the Iceman

by Cindy Hew | Mar 7, 2017

When Helmut Simon and his wife, Erika, stumbled upon an odd sight during their hike of the Ötztal Alps on the Austrian-Italian border in September 1991, they chalked it...

The Legend of the Mermaid

by Cindy Hew | Feb 28, 2017

Considering that water makes up about 71% of the Earth’s surface, it is hardly surprising that there are many mysterious marine creatures associated with our vast seas and lakes....

Ogopogo: The Canadian Water Dragon

by Admin | Feb 20, 2017

The name Ogopogo is perhaps the most unlikely designation for a mysterious creature that continues to divide opinion on whether it actually exists. Ogopogo is the popular name for...

Tales of the Mystical Firebird

by Cindy Hew | Dec 28, 2016

Since ancient times, there has been much fascination with bird-like creatures because of their ability to fly and their freedom to go where mere mortals cannot, at least until...

20 Unbelievable General Facts

by Tsem Rinpoche | Apr 4, 2011

Below are 20 of the most unbelievable facts. Some of them seem possible, some will make you think twice and some will not convince you at all! Do take...

10 Global Mysterious Events

by Tsem Rinpoche | Mar 11, 2011

Here are 10 mysterious events for you to ponder over during your day. It has everything from baby aliens, mysterious findings, unexplained deaths - the kind where the...

The Mysterious Dark Watchers

by Tsem Rinpoche | Oct 24, 2017

Dear friends around the world, As most of you will know, I have always been attracted to tales of supernatural creatures and cryptids like Bigfoot, faeries, aliens, trolls, little...

The Paranormal Zone: Ghost Marriages

by Phng Li Kim | Aug 5, 2017

For this episode, I travelled to Taiwan to visit a temple dedicated to unmarried women who had passed on. I could not understand why a temple needed to be...

The World of Chinese Ghosts

by Stella Cheang | Jul 22, 2017

Chinese Ghosts – Fact or Fiction? Ghosts are commonly featured in Chinese folklore. Ghost stories existed as part of the old oral tradition during the Shang Dynasty (1600 –...

Unseen & Unspoken

by Phng Li Kim | Jul 15, 2017

Melaka has long been known as a historical city in Malaysia, but a lot has transpired since its glory days. Long before this country achieved its independence, political control...

Is This a Photograph of the Buddha?

by Pastor Niral Patel | Jun 29, 2017

(By Tsem Rinpoche) A curious, yet ethereal photograph of Lord Buddha has been in circulation for quite some time. Supposedly a photograph taken of Siddhartha Gautama, also known as...

The Sound of Light

by Phng Li Kim | Feb 25, 2017

In this episode, I explore how sound and light affect the environment and also our daily lives. I have with me, in this episode, a radiant energy scientist, a...

Sleep Paralysis – Medical or Paranormal?

by Vinnie Tan | Sep 16, 2016

Sleep paralysis or more commonly known in Chinese as ‘鬼压床’ is one of the most common paranormal encounters. Hence, most people would have experienced some form of sleep paralysis...

Kuchisake Onna

by Vinnie Tan | Sep 9, 2016

Dear friends, From a young age, I have always been intrigued by Kuchisake Onna, the Slit-Mouthed Woman from Japanese folklore. Originally I didn’t know her name or that she...

Black Eyed Child

by Vinnie Tan | Aug 12, 2016

Dear friends, Black Eyed Children or Black Eyed Kids (BEKs) is another group of paranormal entities triggered my interest and prompted me to find out more since I learned...

Valak – The Conjuring 2 Demon?

by Vinnie Tan | Aug 6, 2016

Dear friends, Recently, there has been a huge craze about a horror movie called The Conjuring 2. Yes! I am a self-professed horror junkie although I am also really...

Paranormal Protection

by Pastor David Lai | Jun 8, 2016

Dear everyone, I have chosen to write about this topic for Rinpoche’s blog because it fascinates me and it is something that many people are drawn to. Generally, people are...

Boo! Why Do We Love The Things That Scare Us?

by Shakila Rajendra | Jun 3, 2016

Despite their keeping us up at night, we all love a good ghost story. We are constantly fascinated by tales of ghouls, demonic possessions and those spirits that cannot...

Mystical Magic and Medical Science

by Phng Li Kim | Aug 28, 2017

In Yogyakarta, I visited Hospital Nur Hidayah where not too long ago, a young woman caused quite a stir. When the woman in question, Supiyati, arrived at the hospital,...

10 Creepy Mysteries You Haven’t Heard Of

by Tsem Rinpoche | May 21, 2011

Mysteries are always interesting to read about. Not only does it make our day a little less mundane, but it also help us to open our mind and contemplate...

The Burning Times

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 18, 2011

The 6-part film below is called “The Burning Times”. It explains what went on during the period from 1450 to 1700. That period of time in history is actually...

Witches

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 6, 2011

Below are videos that I have found on witches. They are very very good and very informative… interesting and you would enjoy watching. Also learn a lot about bias,...

Valak – The Conjuring 2 Demon?

by Vinnie Tan | Aug 6, 2016

Dear friends, Recently, there has been a huge craze about a horror movie called The Conjuring 2. Yes! I am a self-professed horror junkie although I am also really...

Must Watch: The Paranormal Zone on NTV7

by Tsem Rinpoche | Sep 20, 2012

The Paranormal Zone official launch!! Congrats to Celebrity Host Ms. Li Kim!!   Last night, The Paranormal Zone had their official launch party! It was an invitation-only event, held at...

The Mysterious Monsters – narrated by Peter Graves

by Tsem Rinpoche | May 22, 2012

Dear Everyone, Another favorite video of mine narrated by Peter Graves. He does a good job as he seems convinced in what he is narrating. I wish I can...

Psychic Kids (4)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 31, 2010

Another episode of Psychic Kids I thought my friends would enjoy. Notice how the senior psychics train up the younger ones. Reminds me of the Monastery where senior monks...

Celebrity Ghost Stories (7)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 1, 2010

Here’s another wonderful selection of supernatural encounters by celebrities. I find these neat as they show that people from all walks of life have experiences. Have a watch, learn...

Celebrities Ghost Stories (4) and Psychic Kids (2)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 4, 2010

Another dosage of great accounts of the supernatural that gives you a break and also helps you to ponder deeper on mysteries not visible to everyone yet exists. DO...

Celebrities Ghost Stories 2 & 3

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jun 26, 2010

Hello, This is your latest dose of Celebrity Ghosts. I hope you enjoy. Tsem Rinpoche   Part 2   Part 3   Note: All articles published on the blog...

Psychic Kids

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jun 11, 2010

Dear Everyone, Since I was very young I’ve had a huge interest in the paranormal, Tibet, magic, mysteries, bigfoot, lochness, Findhorn, UfOs, Nazca lines, spirits, Salem, Easter Island, dowsing,...

The Mysterious Dark Watchers

by Tsem Rinpoche | Oct 24, 2017

Dear friends around the world, As most of you will know, I have always been attracted to tales of supernatural creatures and cryptids like Bigfoot, faeries, aliens, trolls, little...

The Mysterious Bermuda Triangle

by Cindy Hew | Jul 17, 2017

Mind boggling disappearances of ships and aircrafts – this is what immediately comes to mind at the mere mention of the Bermuda Triangle. Its reputation is so notorious that...

Werewolves: The Shapeshifters

by Cindy Hew | Apr 27, 2017

Commonly associated with the full moon and silver bullets, lycanthropes or werewolves are said to be humans with a mysterious ability to morph into actual wolves or wolf-like creatures...

The Balan-Balan

by Phng Li Kim | Apr 14, 2017

My adventures in Sabah are kept alive in Kota Belud – a place where the natives are firm believers of paganism and the practice of dark magic since hundreds...

Kuchisake Onna

by Vinnie Tan | Sep 9, 2016

Dear friends, From a young age, I have always been intrigued by Kuchisake Onna, the Slit-Mouthed Woman from Japanese folklore. Originally I didn’t know her name or that she...

Legends of Mount Shasta

by Pastor David Lai | Sep 1, 2016

In the language of the Karuk natives, Mt Shasta is known as Úytaahkoo or ‘White Mountain’. It is an active volcano located at the southern tip of the Cascade...

Reincarnation Videos YOU MUST WATCH!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Apr 24, 2015

Nov 28, 2012 (By Tsem Rinpoche) Dear friends, I wanted to share this videos with you for the longest time and happy I can do so now. Learn, ponder...

Can you believe in this?

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 11, 2014

I have always had an interest in mythology and folklore... about mysterious occurrences or beings that were described in books, or from stories shared by our family and friends...

Are angels ancient aliens??

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

Many of us believe in angels. 70% of Americans, believe in the existence of angels… 55% of Americans believe in guardian angels. It is said that every day, one...

Ancient Aliens: The Return

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

“The Return” is the last episode of Season 1 of the Ancient Aliens series. In the 20th century there was evidence that we were still being visited by alien...

Ancient Aliens: The Mission (episode 4)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

If we can make expeditions in search of resources to sustain our culture, wouldn't any other life form who needs resources to survive do the exact same thing by...

Ancient Aliens: The Evidence (Episode 2)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

Hard evidence is presented that makes the possibility of alien existence undeniably real - and yet some people would still rather not accept it. It may go against our...

The Mysterious Bermuda Triangle

by Cindy Hew | Jul 17, 2017

Mind boggling disappearances of ships and aircrafts – this is what immediately comes to mind at the mere mention of the Bermuda Triangle. Its reputation is so notorious that...

Legends of Mount Shasta

by Pastor David Lai | Sep 1, 2016

In the language of the Karuk natives, Mt Shasta is known as Úytaahkoo or ‘White Mountain’. It is an active volcano located at the southern tip of the Cascade...

Reincarnation Videos YOU MUST WATCH!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Apr 24, 2015

Nov 28, 2012 (By Tsem Rinpoche) Dear friends, I wanted to share this videos with you for the longest time and happy I can do so now. Learn, ponder...

Nazca Lines – Another Sign of Paranormal Activity?

by Tsem Rinpoche | Oct 4, 2011

Have you ever wondered how the Nazca Lines are made? Are they man made or is there something else behind its creation that we might not know of...

SUPERMOON

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jun 11, 2011

On March 19th… You may be surprised by what you will see or have seen… For the first time in 18 years, the moon will swing around Earth very...

Just What Are Sailing Stones?

by Tsem Rinpoche | Mar 6, 2011

Look at these pictures and let your imagination try to figure out how this came to pass. Stones in the middle of nowhere that leave trails behind them, yet...

Psychic Kids (4)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 31, 2010

Another episode of Psychic Kids I thought my friends would enjoy. Notice how the senior psychics train up the younger ones. Reminds me of the Monastery where senior monks...

Kid Painter is Mini Monet

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 22, 2010

Kid geniuses are people who were good in something in another life and they from a young age without or with very little training can do something beyond your belief system...

Celebrities Ghost Stories (4) and Psychic Kids (2)

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 4, 2010

Another dosage of great accounts of the supernatural that gives you a break and also helps you to ponder deeper on mysteries not visible to everyone yet exists. DO...

Psychic Kids

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jun 11, 2010

Dear Everyone, Since I was very young I’ve had a huge interest in the paranormal, Tibet, magic, mysteries, bigfoot, lochness, Findhorn, UfOs, Nazca lines, spirits, Salem, Easter Island, dowsing,...

Ancient Chinese Earthquake Detector

by Tsem Rinpoche | Oct 13, 2016

I have always been interested in ancient civilisations such as China, Egypt and Mesopotamia as they reflect the sophistication and advancements of the people at that time. Although people...

Sleep Paralysis – Medical or Paranormal?

by Vinnie Tan | Sep 16, 2016

Sleep paralysis or more commonly known in Chinese as ‘鬼压床’ is one of the most common paranormal encounters. Hence, most people would have experienced some form of sleep paralysis...

Legends of Mount Shasta

by Pastor David Lai | Sep 1, 2016

In the language of the Karuk natives, Mt Shasta is known as Úytaahkoo or ‘White Mountain’. It is an active volcano located at the southern tip of the Cascade...

China builds world’s largest radio telescope to hunt for aliens

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 5, 2016

Dear friends around the world, It is interesting that China is looking for extraterrestrial communications. China is really catching up on all fields of interest. Take a read. Tsem...

Einstein on Buddhism

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 9, 2015

Dear friends around the world, I came across this interesting article recently and thought that it’d be nice to share it on my blog. People would often pick science...

Initial DNA analysis of Paracas elongated skull released

by Tsem Rinpoche | Oct 24, 2014

Initial DNA analysis of Paracas elongated skull released – with incredible results 5 February, 2014 – 13:47 by April Holloway Paracas is a desert peninsula located within the Pisco...

Guess what was found!!!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 18, 2012

I have interests in many subjects. I just don’t have enough time in the day to get deeper into many of the subjects that captures my mind. One of...

Top 10 Space Mysteries

by Tsem Rinpoche | Mar 9, 2011

In something as big as the universe, there are bound to be unexplainable phenomena... and things we truly can’t grasp. The universe shows us how small we really are...

Resurrecting Mammoths

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 17, 2011

Researchers aim to resurrect mammoth in five years By Agence France-Presse | Updated: 1/17/2011 Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using...

A Planet discovered that could have life…..

by Tsem Rinpoche | Sep 30, 2010

Imagine there are 40 BILLION planets out there that can support life in our universe… Wow… There has to be other life forms. The mathematical chances is beyond doubt...

Into The Universe With Stephen Hawking – Time Travel

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 25, 2010

Watch enlightening documentaries online! Into The Universe With Stephen Hawking – Time Travel (2010).The promise of time travel has long been one of the worlds favorite scientific what-ifs? Hawking...

Into the Universe With Stephen Hawking – The Story Of Everything

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 25, 2010

Watch enlightening documentaries online! Into the Universe With Stephen Hawking – The Story Of Everything (2010) In two mind-blowing hours, Hawking reveals the wonders of the cosmos to a...

A Statue that came with Something Else

by Tsem Rinpoche | May 27, 2012

When we toy with the supernatural, we can expect the resultant effect coming back to us. Whether it is a good or bad effect depends on our motivation, and...

Paranormal Experiences Occur Everywhere – Part 2!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 8, 2012

In the late 80’s, I was a university student in Essex, England. I was living in a student hostel at the university ground. The hostel was a high-rise building...

Paranormal Experiences Occur Everywhere – Part 1!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 3, 2012

I like Steven Wong's stories very much as it shows that spirits and unseen beings are actually not restricted to specific areas like cemeteries or abandoned houses. Instead, they...

Bukit Antarabangsa Hauntings

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 2, 2012

Remember the Bukit Antarabangsa Landslide in 2008? What about the Highland Towers apartment building which collapsed in 1993? I am sure that you know many died during those two...

The Shadow On My Bed

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 18, 2012

More and more people are sharing their paranormal experiences with us, and I thank Mr. Michael Moore for sharing with us a very kind and sincere story... can you...

A Relieving Experience

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 17, 2012

Some people encounter with spirits directly and have disturbing experiences with the unseen whilst there are others who experience it very differently, where they feel that the incident has...

A swirl at the foot of my bed

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 24, 2011

  Perhaps Paranormal: Two night ago in the middle of the night in my hotel room, I woke up and noticed a dark swirling ‘entity’ that was not exactly...

The Lady in Red

by Admin | Sep 5, 2011

The two men disappeared into the woods and came out on the other side. They walked very fast without saying a word to one another. Finally, they stopped at...

The Paranormal Zone: Ghost Marriages

by Phng Li Kim | Aug 5, 2017

For this episode, I travelled to Taiwan to visit a temple dedicated to unmarried women who had passed on. I could not understand why a temple needed to be...

The Balan-Balan

by Phng Li Kim | Apr 14, 2017

My adventures in Sabah are kept alive in Kota Belud – a place where the natives are firm believers of paganism and the practice of dark magic since hundreds...

Jean Ai

by Tsem Rinpoche | Apr 12, 2012

Thailand is known for their terrifying horror movies and you know what people say...where there is smoke, there is fire so when Jean Ai went to Bangkok to work...

JP Revisited

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 21, 2012

Whilst the Chinese have practised ancestral worship for centuries, for most people a visit to the graves of their forefathers stops there. A few offerings and some flowers, and...

David Lai

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 13, 2012

Quiet and unassuming, on first appearance David Lai does not come across as a person who has paranormal experiences. As they say however, looks can be deceiving...

JP

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 7, 2012

Facing college life in a new city, JP Thong had no idea what awaited him when he moved thousands of miles away from home to New York, where he...

Till I See Blood

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 2, 2012

After sleepless nights in Bangkok, Angel finally fell asleep, only to find herself struggling for her breath as she was rudely awakened by an unseen stranger. Feeling pressed down...

CJ

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 18, 2012

Many of us have heard that some people have the ability to see the dead and many of us have heard of the movie 'The Sixth Sense'. For 16...

Edward

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 10, 2012

There are many children around the world who tell their parents that they see dark figures. Most of the time, their parents would brush them off and tell them...

Snake Spirit

by Tsem Rinpoche | Dec 13, 2011

This week, I share with you a story that relates to the time when I was residing in southern Thailand. I stayed there for about a month to do...

Burmese Temple & Floating Heads

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 17, 2011

In this episode, we have exclusive rights to film at one of the most exotic locations in Malaysia at night: The Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple. Founded on 1st August...

Red Face

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 1, 2011

This week, I share with all of you 2 paranormal stories. The first relates to the filming location: Shih Chung Branch School. Around 1885, the very first 5-storey bungalow in Penang...

Flatwoods Monster: Close Encounter of the Third Kind?

by Cindy Hew | Nov 25, 2017

If you were in Flatwoods in Braxton Country, West Virginia around September 1952, chances are you would have been caught up in the hype surrounding the first sighting of...

Legends of Mount Shasta

by Pastor David Lai | Sep 1, 2016

In the language of the Karuk natives, Mt Shasta is known as Úytaahkoo or ‘White Mountain’. It is an active volcano located at the southern tip of the Cascade...

They are Everywhere

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 14, 2011

Whether we believe in aliens or not, it is undeniable that the thought of other beings existing in places unknown to mankind yet is interesting...

Foreign Visitor in the Amazon!!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 14, 2011

Alien enthusiasts are always eager to find the latest alien discovery or encounters. Over the years, hundreds of media releases turn out to be hoaxes… It’s difficult to figure...

Spotted in a Sandstorm

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 21, 2011

I received an interesting email from Philip Yong, which shows some live CNN footage of a sandstorm also known as a “Haboob”. What’s interesting to note about this live...

A HUGE Collection of UFO Photographs from 1870 to 2011

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

  I was sent an email with a link to one of the most interesting websites on UFOs: UFOCasebook.com! This website contains A LOT of information in the form...

Top 10 Space Mysteries

by Tsem Rinpoche | Mar 9, 2011

In something as big as the universe, there are bound to be unexplainable phenomena... and things we truly can’t grasp. The universe shows us how small we really are...

Astronauts & Military Men Speak

by Tsem Rinpoche | Feb 16, 2011

There are 2 videos below that are of UFOs. These are probably 2 of the most convincing videos on UFOs so far. This is mostly because the presenters are...

They’re Sighted Everywhere

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jan 31, 2011

This YouTube video was forwarded to me by Shirley Tan. It is of a UFO sighting on the 18th of January in Moscow, Russia. The video was taken from...

Second UFO sighting baffles China & Malaysia

by Tsem Rinpoche | Sep 24, 2010

Another unidentified flying object (UFO) has been spotted hovering over a part in southwestern China’s Chongqing province after a similar sighting last week caused massive flight delays at a...

More UFO videos from China!!! Very Convincing!!!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 29, 2010

You have to watch these neat videos. They are very convincing. I copy and pasted the information below just so you have more to go on and understand. Enjoy...

Unsolved Mysteries – UFO’s & Me…

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jun 14, 2010

Since I was very young, I was naturally drawn to phenomena that was not accepted by ‘mainstream’ public. That didn’t bother me. I was always the type of person...

Lama Jampa Ngodup Wangchuk Rinpoche on Guru Devotion | 向巴恩珠上师(旺秋喇嘛)讲解依师法 | བླ་མ་བྱམས་པ་དངོས་གྲུབ་དབང་ཕྱུག་རིན་བོ་ཆེ་ནས་བཤེས་གཉེན་བསྟེན་ཚུལ་གྱི་སྐོར།

by Tsem Rinpoche | Sep 20, 2017

(中文请往下阅读) Dear friends around the world, The erudite master, teacher, scholar and compassionate spiritual friend Jetsun Jampa Ngodup Wangchuk Rinpoche is one of the greatest teachers in Tibet today. He...

Reincarnation Videos YOU MUST WATCH!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Apr 24, 2015

Nov 28, 2012 (By Tsem Rinpoche) Dear friends, I wanted to share this videos with you for the longest time and happy I can do so now. Learn, ponder...

Pastor Chia on Wah Lai Toi!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Dec 29, 2012

Pastor Chia, a long time student of mine appeared on TV recently. He was interviewed by a Paranormal Program on Astro Wah Lai Toi. It is so exciting to...

Inhuman Entity caught on film

by Tsem Rinpoche | Aug 30, 2012

See this episode. It is very good. Very interesting! Look at 5:01 and see an inhuman entity caught on film. Very interesting how these beings can be caught on...

Bigfoot Proven?? Must Watch!!!

by Tsem Rinpoche | May 22, 2012

American Paranormal is a one year old series on the National Geographic channel. They kicked-off their new series in 2010 with a documentary on Bigfoot!! This documentary uses thorough...

The Mysterious Monsters – narrated by Peter Graves

by Tsem Rinpoche | May 22, 2012

Dear Everyone, Another favorite video of mine narrated by Peter Graves. He does a good job as he seems convinced in what he is narrating. I wish I can...

Foreign Visitor in the Amazon!!

by Tsem Rinpoche | Nov 14, 2011

Alien enthusiasts are always eager to find the latest alien discovery or encounters. Over the years, hundreds of media releases turn out to be hoaxes… It’s difficult to figure...

Ancient Aliens – Season 1 to Season 3

by Tsem Rinpoche | Sep 16, 2011

Ancient Aliens is a series that launched their first episode on 20 April 2010. The series proposes various evidence around the theory that sometime within the existence of human civilization,...

League of Gentlemen visit ‘haunted’ Gloucestershire pub

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 21, 2011

Below is an article that my student, Shirley Tan, sent me. It is about a popular group of British comedians who decided to brave potential scares in a haunted...

Who are the Freemasons?

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

The Freemasons are known to be very secretive and according to some people, almost cult-like. Cult is a very subjective word of course. Although I do not know much....

Are angels ancient aliens??

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

Many of us believe in angels. 70% of Americans, believe in the existence of angels… 55% of Americans believe in guardian angels. It is said that every day, one...

Ancient Aliens: The Return

by Tsem Rinpoche | Jul 3, 2011

“The Return” is the last episode of Season 1 of the Ancient Aliens series. In the 20th century there was evidence that we were still being visited by alien...

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