Wonderful Japan – Kyushu

Jul 10, 2017 | Views: 506
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(By Tsem Rinpoche)

Located in the southernmost part of Japan is Kyushu, which literally means “Nine Provinces” in Japanese. It is Japan’s third biggest island and was the earliest centre of civilisation in Japan. It is also home to Japan’s most active volcano, Mount Aso, as well as a haven for natural hot springs. Fukuoka is Kyushu’s biggest city on the island and has seven districts. With its subtropical climate, Kyushu counts rice, tea, sweet potatoes, soy, and tobacco among its agricultural products.

Those who make their way to Kyushu will find ancient historical sights, great food, and natural wonders with mountainous terrain that will captivate and warm their hearts.

 

History

 

The Origins of Yamato kingdom

Kyushu’s name comes from the nine ancient regions of Saikaido on the island. In ancient times, Kyushu was also known as Kyūkoku (Nine States), Tsukushi-no-shima (Island of Tsukushi) and Chinzei (West of the Pacified Area).

An image of the Sun Goddess Amaterasu who asked her grandson, Ninigi, to rule Japan

An image of the Sun Goddess Amaterasu who asked her grandson, Ninigi, to rule Japan

Its close proximity to South Korea and China made Kyushu an entry point for cultural, artistic, and religious influences from Asia and, later on, the West.

Japanese mythology tells of the sun goddess Amaterasu’s grandson, Ninigi, who came from Mount Takachiho in Miyaki-ken to Earth. The goddess told her grandson to rule over Japan and presented him with royal regalia that included a sword (signifying courage), a mirror (signifying purity), and jewels (signifying benevolence). These Japanese imperial symbols endure to this day.

The God of Wealth, Okuninushi, submitted to Ninigi and gave him control over the religious affairs of Japan. This pleased the goddess Amaterasu who presented him with a Grand Shrine in Izumo as an expression of her gratitude. Today, Okuninushi continues to be worshipped as an important deity in Kyushu.

 

The Mongol Invasion

In 1274, Kublai Khan sent the Mongol and the Korean armies to invade Japan. They landed their ships at Hataka, but a huge storm destroyed the Mongol fleet and forced them to retreat. After this incident, the Japanese became more vigilant and were prepared for the second Mongol invasion in 1281. Yet again, 200 of Kublai Khan’s ships were destroyed by a treacherous typhoon, driving the survivors back to Korea. The locals believe that the gods answered their prayers by sending these great typhoons, called “kamikaze” (Divine Wind), to protect them.

200 of Kublai Khan’s ships were destroyed by a treacherous Japanese typhoon during the second invasion by the Mongols

200 of Kublai Khan’s ships were destroyed by a treacherous Japanese typhoon during the second invasion by the Mongols

 

Western Influence

Japan’s first contact with the West occurred in 1543 when three Portuguese merchants were blown off-course and landed at an island called Tanega-shima. Then, in 1549, Saint Francis Xavier travelled to Japan via Kyushu and spread Catholicism across the island. However, in 1637, the Tokugawa Shogun warriors attacked and killed 40,000 Catholics in a battle called Shimabara. They did not want Christianity to rule and considered it a direct threat to the country’s sovereignty. This forced the Japanese Christians to go underground. Japanese Christianity only re-established itself again in the mid-1800s.

 

Location

Map of Kyushu. Click on image to enlarge.

Map of Kyushu. Click on image to enlarge.

Map of Kyushu. Click on image to enlarge.

Map of Kyushu. Click on image to enlarge.

Japan is made up of four main islands – Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu in the south. Kyushu is the third largest island in Japan and is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean, the Japan Sea, and the East China Sea. As a southern island, Kyushu enjoys the slightly warmer climate of the subtropics but is also vulnerable to annual typhoons. Like the rest of Japan, Kyushu’s landscape is mountainous with fertile valleys, except for the top of the island, which is a wide plain area where the largest cities, Fukuoka and Kitakyushu, are located.

 

Prefectures

Fukuoka – Home to the cities of Kitakyushu and Fukuoka.

Kumamoto – A major city on the west coast of Kyushu, home to the Amakusa chain of islands and Mount Aso, with a caldera known to be the largest in the world.

Nagasaki – A hilly city that has gone through World War II as it was the main harbour and the target of America’s second atomic weapon attack. The Atomic Bomb Museum and Peace Park are memorials for this unfortunate event.

Oita – A rural area famed for its many onsen hot springs, especially in Beppu city.

Saga – A small and rustic district, famous for its pre-historic ruins and pottery.

Miyazaki – Japan’s surfers’ paradise boasting big waves and beaches, and the gorgeous Takachiho Gorge with Shinto shrines.

Kagoshima – This is a seaside city dominated by the Sakurajima volcano, where it is hot enough for even sugarcanes to grow, and hot sandy beaches.You can also visit the famous Tanegashima and Yakushima islands.

Okinawa – The southernmost prefecture covers hundreds of the Ryukyu Islands, which extend south-west from Kyushu to Taiwan. 75% of U.S. military installations stationed in Japan are on this island and, currently, about 26,000 troops are based here.

 

Population

Kyushu covers 35,640 square kilometres (13,761 square miles) with a population of 13. 320 million people.

 

Climate

Kyushu has a subtropical climate and in the southern Honshu regions, the temperature can range from 5°C during the winter to just over 30°C during the summer.

The winters here are mild and, from early April onwards, you will get to enjoy the cherry blossoms, which can be seen all over the island.

Here is when you can expect the four different seasons in Kyushu:

  • Winter – January to February

Expect cold air from Siberia, but you can also experience sunny weather in Kyushu. However, in Amami, expect cloudy or rainy conditions. Winter is considered mild here due to its subtropical climate.

  • Spring – March to May

Temperatures start to increase with the warm southerly winds. Expect longer days from April to May. Take note that in Amami, the rainy season (Baiu) starts around mid-May.

  • Summer – June to August

In Kyushu, the rainy season, Baiu, starts at the end of May and ends in mid-July. But, in Amami, it starts in mid-May and ends in late June. They have the heaviest rainfalls in Japan. From July to August, which is the second half of summer, expect very hot and humid conditions. Temperatures can rise up to 35°C and above. However, in Amami Island, it is very rare that the temperatures will go up to 35°C and above due to the seaside climate.

  • Autumn – September to November

With decreasing temperatures, expect autumn rainfalls and tropical cyclones. In October, you can expect better sunny conditions and refreshing winds in Kyushu. However, in Amami, be prepared for cloudy or rainy days with cold winds.

 

When to Visit

Spring and summer are the best time to visit as the temperatures are at a pleasant level. Most of the days will be sunny during this time, and you will experience some tropical rainfall in June. There is also high chance of typhoons during the tail end of the summer season turning towards autumn, which is around August to September.

However, once the typhoon season is over, you can expect to enjoy blue skies for the rest of the autumn.

 

What to Wear

It all depends on when you are travelling to Kyushu and where you will be going. Bear in mind that the rainy season is in June, so make sure that you have raincoats and umbrellas with you. Alternatively, you can purchase them from the many convenience stores available. Try to avoid going to Kyushu during the typhoon season. Below is a quick guide on what to wear, but we would advise you to do further research on the local temperature and weather forecast during the time you plan to visit.

  1. March to May – Fairly warm. Wearing a long-sleeved shirt or blouse is ideal.
  2. May to September – Hot. Cooling cotton clothes, short sleeve shirts and shorts are best.
  3. October – Summer is ending. Prepare yourself with long sleeves and lots of layering.
  4. November – Cool to cold. Bring a coat, a jumper, and some sweaters.

 

Culture & Customs

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Japan’s multifaceted culture is fascinatingly profound. Although its society is in a continuous state of flux with shifting trends, fashion, and technology, they still hold on to traditions that go back thousands of years.

Japanese people are not known to be loud and flashy; they much prefer simplicity to luxurious clutter. This is what you will observe in their food, culture, and lifestyle. Everything is very clean and simple, yet they are prepared with extreme attention to the details. Something as simple as preparing tea or cutting a fish is executed with great care, making it a profound art in itself. This is the general Japanese culture. There are many customs and strict etiquette rules that you should be aware of while you are in Japan.

Here are some basic customs and social etiquette to observe when visiting Japan, and Kyushu is no different.

1. Greeting Custom

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In Japan, one of the basic ways to greet someone with respect is by bowing. This form of greeting has been instilled in children from the moment they are old enough to enter school. As a tourist, you can just bow your head slightly. It is sufficient to show that you are attempting to bow, although it would be nice to give a proper bow.

The duration and angle of your bow depend on the status or hierarchy of the person you are greeting. For example, a friend will get a quick 30-degree bow, whereas a superior in the office will probably get a slow 70-degree bow.

Besides bowing, it is also important to address someone by attaching the suffix “san” to their last name. You would use “sama” if you wish to show great respect, perhaps to a senior or someone of high status. It is the same as addressing someone who is a doctor with their title, for example, “Doctor XXX”, rather than just calling them by their name.

You can address children by just their names but, if you wish to follow their customs all the way, you can attach the suffix “chan” for girls, and “kun” for boys, at the end of their last names.

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Click on image to enlarge

2. Mind Your Table Manners

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Click on image to enlarge

  • You will be shown to your seat, so be patient as there are protocols to follow.
  • The most senior or honoured guest will usually be seated in the middle of the table and the furthest away from the entrance door.
  • When you are served drinks at a party, do not drink immediately. Instead, observe and wait for everyone else to be served. Then, someone in the group will usually take the lead and make a speech. The Japanese toast of “Kampai!” carries the same meaning as “Cheers!”.
  • In most Japanese restaurants, you will be given a small wet cloth to wipe your hands with before eating. After you have done so, carefully fold it and place it aside. It is not be used to wipe your face or as a napkin.
  • Slurping or making loud noises while eating noodles is considered polite. It means the food that you are eating is delicious and that you are enjoying it.
  • You can bring your rice bowl to your mouth when you are eating with chopsticks.
  • It is polite to say “itadakimasu” (“I will receive”) before you start eating, and this applies everywhere. It does not matter if you are having a full seven-course dinner or just sampling food at the markets.
  • It is good to try a bit of everything and acceptable to enquire what type of food you are being served before eating it. It is alright if you make a face when you accidentally eat something you do not like.
  • Japanese people do not normally mix other food with rice. It is good manners to eat a bit of one item at a time instead of mixing it all up in your rice.
  • If you do not want more drinks, do not leave an empty cup as that is considered a request to refill your drink.
  • Finish your rice because, if you leave even just a small amount in your bowl, you will be served more. It is best to finish everything in your bowl if you do not want more.
  • If you cannot finish your food, it is acceptable to leave a small amount on your plate.

3. Using Chopsticks

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In most of the local eateries, your food will be served with chopsticks. There are no forks and spoons available, so it would be wise of you to learn how to eat with chopsticks before heading to Japan. It is not difficult to learn, and you will even amaze some of the locals with your ability. Here some basic things you need to know when using chopsticks.

  • Do not use your chopsticks to point at anything or wave them in the air.
  • Do not use your chopsticks to pierce your food or your rice.
  • Return your chopsticks onto the chopstick rest when you are not eating, or when you stop to drink or speak.
  • When you place your chopsticks on the chopstick rest, do not cross them.
  • Once you are done eating, place your chopsticks back on its rest or on the side. Do not place them on top of your bowl.

4. No Tipping

You do not need to tip anyone for anything in Japan. It is actually considered insulting to tip someone in Japan because the price that you are charged already covers his or her services.

5. Take Your Shoes Off

When visiting someone’s home, please remove your shoes at the entrance. This also applies to most businesses and hotels. They will usually provide a rack or a place to store your shoes. Guest slippers are provided for you to use indoors. Most Japanese people will bring their own indoor slippers.

Do not wear your slippers on a tatami mat. If you need to go to the toilet, slippers are provided. Do use them, but remember to take them off and place them back where you found them.

6. Blowing Your Nose

It is considered rude to blow your nose in public. If you need to do it, go to the washroom.

7. Eating on the Go

It is considered very sloppy to eat while you are walking. If you need to eat, find a place to sit and eat your food properly before proceeding to your next destination.

8. Talking on the Phone

In general, Japanese do not speak loudly, and they definitely do not have loud conversations on their mobile phones for the world to hear while travelling on public transports. You will notice that people do not speak on the phone when they are on the train or in a shop. Copy their example to draw unnecessary attention to yourself.

9. Public Bathing

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There are many public bathhouses all across Japan called “onsen” or hot springs. Here are some basic etiquette to observe:

  • In most bathhouses, you will be required to go nude. You are not allowed to wear a bathing suit.
  • You can only bring a small towel with you into the “onsen”. At some places, such as hotels and “ryokan”, you are provided with soap and shampoo. Otherwise, it is best to bring your own.
  • You need to completely wash and clean yourself at the showers before entering the bath. You cannot bring any soap into the “onsen” water.
  • You may not be allowed to enter an “onsen” if you have a tattoo. It is nothing personal as they are concerned for the general public’s comfort, so please don’t get offended.
  • The “onsen” is not a swimming pool, so please do not splash or play in the water. Just sit back and relax.
  • The” onsen” is not unisex. There is a section for females, which is red, and a section for males, which is blue. Be careful not to go into the wrong section!
  • The little towel you bring to the “onsen” is not to be used in the water. Instead, you can place them on your head.
  • If you are invited into a Japanese household, they will give you the honour of using the bath first. Take extra care to not dirty the water in any way. Maintaining the sanctity of the “ofuro” (bath) is of extremely important to the Japanese.
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Click on image to enlarge

10. Etiquette When Visiting a Buddhist Temple or Shinto Shrine

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Visiting a Temple

  • You are advised to behave in a calm and respectful manner.
  • Before entering the temple, bow slightly then purify yourself at the chozuya, which is a water-filled basin used for washing your hands and mouth before approaching the temple. This rule also applies when you are visiting a shrine. Do not wash your mouth by using the water directly from the ladle. Instead, pour the water into a cup provided. Some visitors will skip this part of the purification ritual and go without rinsing their mouths.
  • You may offer incense (“osenko”), which is provided, and place them in a large incense burner, which is usually placed in the middle of the courtyard. You can fan some smoke towards yourself as it is believed that the smoke has healing properties. Some people would fan the smoke on to the areas of their injuries.
  • Remove your shoes before entering the temple. Place your shoes neatly on the shelves provided at the entrance. In some temples, you will be provided with a plastic bag to take your shoes with you. It would be wise to wear socks.
  • If you are a Buddhist, you can make a short, respectful prayer in front of the Buddha. You may do so by gently tossing a coin into the offering box in the front, then ringing the bell two to three times, provided the temple has a bell. After that, proceed with your prayer.
  • Photography is allowed on the temple grounds but not inside the temple. This applies to some temples but not all, so do look out for the signs.

Visiting a Shrine

  • As with visiting temples, you are advised to behave in a calm and respectful manner.
  • If you are ill, have an open wound, or in mourning, it is recommended that you do not visit a shrine as they are thought to be causes of impurity.
  • Before entering the shrine, bow slightly then purify yourself at the chozuya (purification fountain) located near the shrine’s entrance. You should wash your hands and rinse your mouth.
  • In the main prayer hall, before making a prayer, gently place a coin into the offering box. Then, bow deeply twice, clap your hands twice, and then bow deeply again before proceeding with your short prayer. This is the part that is slightly different from visiting a temple. If the shrine has a gong, you may strike it before saying your prayers.
  • Photography is generally allowed at shrines, but it is best to look out for the signs.
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Click on image to enlarge

 

Visas

Visa-Free

Countries that are allowed visa-free visits for up to 90 days are: EU & EEA member states, Australia, Andorra, Argentina, Bahamas, Canada, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Hong Kong, Honduras, Macau, Macedonia, Mauritius, Monaco, Mexico, Israel, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, San Marino, Switzerland, Suriname, Tunisia, Uruguay and United States/American Samoa.

  • Brunei – visa-free visits for up to 15 days.
  • United Kingdom, Austria, Ireland, Germany, Mexico, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein can apply for 6-month extended stay visas with Japan’s Ministry of Justice.
  • Malaysia, Barbados, Serbia, Lesotho, and Turkey are allowed to visit visa-free for up to 90 days, provided they have a biometric passport. For Thailand, it is only 15 days.
  • Taiwan is allowed to visit visa-free for 90 days, provided that the passport has a personal identification number.
  • Indonesian citizens with a biometric passport who have been issued a Visa Waiver Registration Certificate are allowed to visit visa-free for up to 15 days.
  • Chinese citizens who are travelling via cruise ships do not need a visa. However, they must leave on the same cruise ship in order for them to be qualified for this.
  • All other nationalities are required to obtain a “temporary visitor” visa prior to arrival. The temporary visitor visa is valid for 90 days. You can visit The Ministry of Foreign Affairs website to get more information on visas.
  • If you are just transiting between international flights at the airport, no visa is required as long as you stay within the secured designated area.

 

Food

Kyushu offers a variety of unique local cuisines from seven different prefectures; Fukuoka, Nagasaki, Saga, Kumamoto, Oita, Miyazaki, and Kagoshima. Each prefecture has their own speciality dishes. Below is a list of fabulous food that you can find in each prefecture.

1. Fukuoka Prefecture – Pork Bone Ramen

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You can find many popular Japanese dishes in Kyushu, but the pork bone ramen is especially famous here. The broth is made from boiling pork bones, making the soup very sweet and tasty. The original pork bone ramen stall is said to be in front of JR Kurume Station.
Fukuoka Prefecture is also the home of famous strawberry brands such as “Amaou” and “Hakata Toyonoka”. Being an island, you can also find an abundance of seafood.

2. Saga Prefecture: Chargrilled Seafood and Branded Beef

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Saga Prefecture is well-known for its fresh seafood products from the Ariake Sea, like the turban shell, clams, mantis shrimp, shiba shrimp, gazami (crab), and many kinds of fishes. The most popular dish among tourists is “Hamayaki”, which is grilled seafood. Fresh oysters and turban shells are chargrilled in their shells.

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Saga beef is considered one of the highest graded beef (Japanese Wagyu) in Japan. Saga cattle are bred and nurtured with great care. They are provided with a clean, rich, and natural environment, delicious water, and good climate conditions. This helps produce the best quality of beef, known as premium-marbled meat. It is a type of Japanese black beef that has a very tender texture. People from all over the world come here especially to savour their branded beef.

3. Nagasaki Prefecture: Shippoku Course Meal and Chanpon

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Nagasaki Prefecture has a variety of unique local dishes, and one of them is known as “Shippoku”. It is an assortment of dishes, which are a fusion of Japanese, Chinese, and Western dishes. Some of the dishes are various types of sashimi, Tonpo-ni (boiled pork), Hashito (shrimp toast), tempura, bean dishes, vegetables, soups, desserts, and more. They are best enjoyed in groups and are usually served on round tables for everyone to enjoy.

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Another popular Nagasaki dish is “chanpon”, which is a special type of thick noodles served with a lot of different toppings such as seafood and vegetables.

4. Oita Prefecture: Toriten Chicken

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Oita prefecture is the best place to have chicken, particularly the popular chicken tempura dishes known as “Toriten”. They are pieces of bite-sized chicken, battered with wheat flour, deep-fried, and served with its special Ponzu sauce, which is a dipping sauce made from soy sauce and citrus juice.

Although the Toriten can be easily found in every restaurant in Oita, it is said to have originated from the Touyouken Restaurant in Beppu City. So, if you are visiting Beppu, be sure to try this delicious dish!

5. Kumamoto Prefecture: Karashi-renkon

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Here in Kumamoto Prefecture, you will get a chance to try many historical local dishes. One of them is “Karashi-renkon”, which is lotus root with mustard. This dish was originally created as a healthy dish in the 17th century for the Lord of Kumamoto Domain. The holes of a lotus root are filled with mustard and miso paste. Next, it is coated with a batter made from wheat flour and turmeric, and then deep-fried. Traditionally, Karashi-renkon is served during special occasions such as the New Year, but, today, there are many shops that specialise in this unique, authentic dish.

6. Miyazaki Prefecture: Hyuga Kabocha Pumpkin, Hyuganatsu and Chicken-nanban

Steamed Hyuga Kabocha

Steamed Hyuga Kabocha

The prosperous farming and poultry industries have made Miyazaki Prefecture a land famous for its fruits and vegetables. One of its more famous species of pumpkin is the “Hyuga Kabocha”. This special type of pumpkin and the “Hyuganatsu”, a type of citrus fruit, are indigenous to Miyazaki.

Hyuganatsu is an indigenous fruit from Miyazaki

Hyuganatsu is an indigenous fruit from Miyazaki

Chicken-nanban is a popular dish everywhere

Chicken-nanban is a popular dish everywhere

One of the very popular local dishes here in Miyazaki Prefecture is the “Chicken-nanban”. The chicken fillet is battered and then deep-fried until it is crispy. Served with sweet vinegar sauce and tartar sauce, this tasty crispy chicken with a refreshing sweet and sour flavour is usually eaten with rice or enjoyed as a snack by itself.

7. Kagoshima Prefecture: Kurobuta Pork

A Kurobuta pork dish cooked with radish, miso and shochu

A Kurobuta pork dish cooked with radish, miso and shochu

Kagoshima Prefecture is famous for its prosperous livestock industry, and for “Kagoshima Kurobuta”, which is their famous brand of pork used in their local dishes. Kurobuta meat with bone is usually boiled for several hours with ingredients such as daikon radish, brown sugar, Kagoshima miso, konnyaku, and shochu, which brings out a rich and distinct flavour. This dish used to be enjoyed at banquets but, due to its popularity, it is now a side dish served with alcohol.

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Another well-known dish is the “Satsuma-age” fish cake, where grounded fish meat is marinated and deep-fried in oil. There are a few types of Satsuma-age fish cake – some are mixed with vegetables or beans, while some are plain.

 

20 Great Places to Visit in Kyushu

 

1. Shofukuji Temple in Fukuoka

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Shofukuji Temple in Fukuoka city is considered the very first Zen temple built in Japan. The temple was established by the Zen priest Eisai in 1195, who also started the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism that came from China to Japan.

Zen is known as Chan Buddhism in China and was introduced during the 6th century by an Indian monk named Bodhidharma (Daruma in Japan). For the next six centuries, emissaries from Japan tried to spread Zen Buddhism in Japan, but it did not take root until Eisai brought back the teachings of Rinzai Zen at the end of the 12th century.

The Golden Buddhas inside Shofukuji temple Butsuden Hall

The Golden Buddhas inside Shofukuji temple’s Butsuden Hall

Visitors are not allowed to enter the temple, but you are allowed to walk freely around the exterior parts of the temple, which is very beautiful and calming.

There are a few gates around the pristine Shofukuji temple grounds. One of the more prominent ones is the Sanmon Gate, which leads to a tree-lined path towards Butsuden Hall. In this special hall, there is an ancient wooden Buddha statue that has been painted in gold and on his side are two huge standing Buddhas, one on each side. While you cannot enter the temple, you might be able to sneak a peek from outside. The temple ceiling features a beautifully painted dragon. Other points of interest at this temple is the Korean-style belfry and a hall dedicated to the Zen master Eisai.

It is very peaceful to explore and walk along the narrow walled lanes of the Shofukuji temple ground as it is surrounded by many smaller temples with classical Zen architecture.

 

How to Get There

You can walk to Shofukuji Temple from Gion Station, which is one station away from the Hakata subway station. Tickets cost 100 yen for one way. Or, you can just start walking from Hakata Station as it is just a 15- to 20-minute walk.

Address/Location: 6-1 Gokusho-machi, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka, 812-0037, Japan
Phone: +81 92 291 0775
Entrance Fee: Free
Opening Hours: A temple is always open
Website: http://www.shofukuji.or.jp/

 

Accommodation

There many hotels around Shofukuji Temple ranging from luxurious five-star to budget hotels. We recommend you do further research to find one that fits your budget and requirements. It is always best to stay near the subway station as it is the main mode of transport to get around Fukuoka City.

1. Fukuoka Toei Hotel
Address: 1-1-23 Takasago, Chuo-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 810-0011, Japan
Phone: +81 92 524 2121
Website: http://toei-hotels.jp/fukuoka/

2. Hotel Nikko Fukuoka
Address: 2-18-25 Hakata Eki-Mae, Hakata, Fukuoka 812-0011, Japan
Phone: +81 92 482 1111
Website: http://www.hotelnikko-fukuoka.com/

 

2. Kawachi Fujien Wisteria Garden in Fukuoka

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Kawachi Fujien Wisteria Garden is a private garden located in the south of central Kitakyushu, Fukuoka. It is famous for its amazing garden filled with an abundance of wisteria flowers. The flowers bloom at the end of April to mid-May, which is peak season, and during the maple leaf season in autumn. Hence, the garden is open to the public during that time.

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The garden’s prominent feature is the two long tunnels, one is approximately 80 meters long and the other 220 meter long tunnel made with a variety of wisteria trees, giving a beautiful range of purple, pink, green and white colours. There is also a group of large wisteria trees with beautiful flowers dangling down, forming a colossal roof of heavenly purple flowers. Enjoy the spectacular breathtaking view of a sea of wisteria flowers at the top of the hillside garden, surrounded by valleys of bamboo groves. This is definitely a must-visit garden for purple flower lovers.

Due to its growing popularity with the locals as well as international visitors, the garden can become very busy and crowded during blooming season. It is advisable to buy your tickets in advance. Cars are discouraged from accessing the garden during the peak season.

 

How to Get There

The best way to get to Kawachi Wisteria Garden is by public transportation. You can access the garden via JR Yahata Station. It takes about 15 minutes, and costs 280 yen one-way, when you take it from Kokura Station. You can also rent a car to get around as long as it is not during the weekends and public holidays, as the roads will be filled with traffic.

By Shuttle Bus

A shuttle bus runs between Yahata Station and the Kawachi Wisteria Garden during the peak season. Do note that even the bus service will be affected during the busy periods due to heavy traffic.

By Bus

Take Nishitetsu bus number 56, which comes every hour from Yahata Station to Kamishigeta, It costs 260 yen one-way and will take 20 minutes. Once you alight from the bus, it can take you about 45-55 minutes to walk to the garden. Unlike the shuttle bus, these buses will not be affected by heavy traffic on busy days as it is located far from the garden.

By Car

If you plan to drive there, it is best to go during the non-peak season. There are about 200 free parking spaces located near the garden entrance and the Ajisainoyu bathhouse. However, during peak season, weekends, and public holidays, the parking lots fill up quickly. Expect long traffic jams along the road, from central Kitakyushu towards the garden. The southern access road may be a better choice (e.g. from Yahata IC or Kokura-minami IC along the Kyushu Expressway) as it is less crowded and you can find ample parking spaces. The walk from the parking space to the garden is about 15-20 minutes.

Address/Location: 805-0045 Fukuoka Prefecture, Kitakyushu, Yahatahigashi Ward, Kawachi, 2 Chome-2-4-8, Japan
Phone: +81 93 652 0334
Entrance Fee: 500 yen, 1000 yen or 1500 yen (depending on the season)

Note: Tickets purchased in advance cost 500 yen. Advance reservations are required during the peak season or visitors will not be allowed into the garden. You can purchase your ticket online via japanican.com or from 7-Eleven and Family Mart convenience stores with ticket machines. Take note that these ticket machines are only in the Japanese language, so you may need to ask someone to help you if you do not read Japanese. During the non-peak season, you can purchase tickets on the same day at the garden.

Opening Hours: 8am – 6pm daily
Website: http://kawachi-fujien.com/

 

Accommodation

There are many accommodation near Kawachi Fujien Wisteria Garden ranging from luxurious 5-star hotels to more economical options. These are two hotels that are relatively near. However, it is recommended that you do further research to find the right accommodation to suit your needs and budget.

1. Comfort Hotel Kurosaki, Kitakyushu
Address: 3-13-13 Kurosaki, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka-ken, 806-0021, Japan
Phone: +81 93 644 1411
Website: https://goo.gl/ckRzkd

2. ARC INN KUROSAKI, Kitakyushu
Address: 3-2-1 Kurosaki, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, 806-0021, Japan
Phone: +81 93 632 8100
Website: http://www.arcinn-kurosaki.com/

 

3. Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine in Fukuoka

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Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine is considered the most important shrine among the hundreds of Tenmangu Shrines across Japan. The Tenmangu Shrines are dedicated to Sugawara Michizane, who was a great scholar and politician during the Heian period. Michizane is often related to a Shinto deity for education named Tenjin, who is popular with students.

From a very young age, Michizane showed extraordinary talents. He wrote his first piece of poetry at the tender age of eleven. He went on to become a very successful politician and wielded influence in the imperial court, which was dominated by the Fujiwara clan at that time.

Sugawara Michizane who is a great scholar and politician during the Heian period (845 – 903)

Sugawara Michizane who is a great scholar and politician during the Heian period (845 – 903)

He passed away in the year 903 in Dazaifu, a few years after he was sent into exile. Many natural disasters occurred shortly after his death. The locals believed that these catastrophes were caused by the angry spirit of Michizine who was not pleased by the unjust treatment he received. The locals made special offerings to appease him, which was how the tradition of Tenmangu Shrine began.

The shrine measures about 250 meters from one end to the other. After you have passed the tori gate, you will see a pond in the shape of the Japanese character for “heart”. Then, you will come across a path leading to two arched bridges and an island representing the past, present, and future.

After you have crossed the bridges, you will enter a courtyard where the shrine’s main hall, known as honden, is located. You can find a special plum tree on the right side of the main hall. Legend has it that it flew from Kyoto to Dazaifu to accompany Michizine when he went into exile as he was particularly fond of plum trees. There are 6000 plum trees dotted around the Dazaifu Tenmangu grounds, and they usually bloom from late February to mid-March.

During exam season, Dazaifu Tenmangu temple will be filled with many students buying ema charms to make wishes for their exams to be successful

During exam season, Dazaifu Tenmangu temple will be filled with many students buying ema charms to make wishes for their exams to be successful

There is a huge range of good luck charms that can be purchased from the shops around the main hall. Since Michizane is associated with education, these charms are especially popular with students who believe that they will help them through their exams. You will find Dazaifu Tenmangu very popular among students, especially during exam time, when you will see hundreds of ema charms (wooden plates) hanging all over the place.

There is a direct path from Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine leading to the Kyushu National Museum if you are keen to visit and learn more about Michizane.

 

How to Get There

Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine is just a five-minute walk from Dazaifu Station. Another option is to take a one-minute bus ride which costs 100 yen. Miya-mae bus stop is where you get off to head to the shrine. There are three buses running every hour.

Address/Location: 818-0117 4-7-1 Dazaifu, Dazaifu-shi, Fukuoka, Japan
Phone: +81 92 922 8225
Fee: Free
Opening Hours: 6am to 7pm; 6am to 7:30pm (June to August); 6:30am to 6:30pm (winter)

 

Accommodation

There are many accommodation near and around Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine ranging from simple hostels to luxurious hotels. Here are just two examples, so we recommend you do further research to find the right accommodation for you.

1. Guesthouse Asobigokoro Fukuoka Dazaifu – Hostel
Address: 1-22-26, Ishizaka, Dazaifu, Fukuoka, 818-0118, Japan
Phone: +81 92 923 1123
Website: http://www.aso.ne.jp/asobi-gokoro/dazaifu/index.html

2. Green Rich Hotel Nishitetsu Ohashi Ekimae
Address: 1-7-15 Ohashi Minamiku, Fukuoka, 830-0017, Japan
Phone: +81 92 552 4400
Website: http://www.gr-ohhashi.com/

 

4. Yatai Food Stalls in Fukuoka

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If you are in Fukuoka, you must experience their popular open-air food stands known as yatai. These yatai provides a small bench with seats around it. It can usually fit around seven to eight people at one go. These mobile food stands allow people to enjoy simple, quick meals like ramen, yakitori (chicken skewers), oden (hot pot) and other local dishes in the fresh outdoor environment.

The Japanese government have implemented regulations against these food stands due to health concerns. Hence, there has been a huge decrease in these food stands. Fukuoka seems to be the place where it is most prevalent, though they are also slowly diminishing there. So far, there are more than 150 yatai spread all over Fukuoka. The most popular place to find these yatai food stands would be in the south part of Nakasu Island. There are about 20 yatai parked along the waterfront in the city of Nakasu Island.

 

How to Get There

You can find yatai all around the city. However, if you wish to check out the yatai stands in Nakasu Island, you will need to take the bus from Hakata Station or Tenjin Station for 100 yen. There are plenty of buses, and they leave every 5-10 minutes.

You can also stop at Minami Tenjin Station or Nakasu Kawabata Station. From these stations, it is just a 10-minute walk.

Address/Location: Nakasu 1Chome Hakata/33.590830, 130.407645 (on Google map)
Phone: NIL
Fee: NIL
Opening Hours: 6pm – 1am (Most yatai stands are close on Sundays or during bad weather)
Website: http://yatai.fukuoka.jp/oyafuko/kitaro_oyafuko

 

Accommodation

There are many accommodation near these yatai food stands in Fukuoka, and they range from luxurious 5-star hotels to more economical options. These are two hotels that are relatively near. However, it is recommended that you do further research to find the right accommodation to fit your needs and budget.

1. Candeo Hotels – The Hakata Terrace
Address: 2-4-14 Haruyoshi Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-0003, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 92 734 0300
Website: https://www.candeohotels.com/en/hakata/

2. Vessel Inn Hakata Nakasu
Address: 5-1-12 Nakasu, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka 810-0801, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
Tel: +81 92 271 4055
Website: https://www.vessel-hotel.jp/inn/hakatanakasu/

 

5. Yoshinogari Park in Saga

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The Yoshinogari Park in Saga Prefecture is a remarkable archaeological site where you can explore and have a glimpse of how people used to live during the Yayoi Period (300 BC to 300 AD). These include dozens of pit dwellings, elevated storehouses, and the discovery of more than 2000 tombs that have been unearthed. This is the best place to learn more about Japanese history during this era.

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The unearthed settlements are considered the largest moat-encircled villages during that era. It was also the seat of one of Japan’s earliest government body. This ancient site has been well preserved with villages that have been realistically reproduced to bring visitors back in time to experience the life and culture of the Yayoi people. These carefully reconstructed settlements consist of elevated storehouses, watchtowers, dozens of pit dwellings, shrines, and other structures that visitors can explore.

There is also the Kita Naikaku settlement, which is located nearby. This settlement also consists of a large shrine and houses where ancient ceremonies were carried out. As you continue towards the north, you will discover an ancient forest that used to cover the entire area about two millennia ago.

Near the East Gate, you will come across a living centre where visitors can take part in hands-on activities such as building a fire using a bow-drill and stone carving. Besides its historical sites, this huge park has recreational areas, open fields for picnic sports, playgrounds, disc golf, and even a miniature golf course. There is also an agricultural field with flowers and a variety of crops grown here. The restaurant and souvenir shop is located at the East Gate.

 

How to Get There

From Fukuoka:
Take the Kyushu Shinkansen to Shin-Tosu from Hakata Station. Then, transfer to a local train to Yoshinogarikoen Station. The trip is around 35 minutes and costs about 2000 yen. Take note that not all shinkansen trains stop at Shin-Tosu Station.

Another alternative is to take a local/limited express train from Hakata to Tosu. From Yoshinogarikoen, you can take the local train. It takes about 45-75 minutes, and costs around 840 yen for the local train, or 2000 yen for the limited express train. It is a 10-15 minute walk from Yoshinogarikoen Station. Alternatively, you can take a taxi for 700 yen to the park’s East Gate.

From Nagasaki:
Catch the a limited express train to Saga. Then, transfer to a local train to Kanzaki Station. The trip takes around 2 hours and costs about 3500 yen. There is also a few direct local trains which take you all the way in. Travel time is 3 hours, and the cost is 2130 yen one-way.

If you are coming from Kanzaki Station, it will take you about 10-15 minutes to walk there. Alternatively, you can take a taxi for 700 yen to the park’s West Gate.

Address/Location: 1869 Tade, Yoshinogari-cho, Kanzaki-gun 842-0035, Japan
Phone: +81 952 53 3902
Fee: 420 yen (Adults); 80 yen (Elementary and middle school students); 200 yen Senior citizens (more than 65 years old)
Opening Hours: 9am to 5pm (6pm from June to August) There are actually no set opening hours, so you can start your climb as early as at 6am. The hill is a great spot to view the sunset at the summit, and they are open until late evening.
Website: http://www.yoshinogari.jp/en/

 

Accommodation

Below are two recommended hotels near Yoshinogari Park. However, there are many other hotels ranging from five-star accommodation to budget hotels. We recommend that you do further research to find the right accommodation that suits your needs.

1. Toyoko Inn Saga Ekimae
Address: 1-10-36 Ekimae-chuo, Saga, Saga, 840-0801, Japan
Phone: +81 952 23 1045
Website: https://goo.gl/GfjyBF

2. Comfort Hotel Saga
Address: 1-14-38 Ekimaechuo, Saga, Saga-ken, 840-0801, Japan
Phone: +81 952 36 6311
Website: https://goo.gl/cCdKer

 

6. Yutoku Inari Shrine in Saga

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The Yutoku Inari Shrine is one of three major Inari shrines in Japan along with the Fushimi Inari Shrine in Kyoto and the Kasama Inari Shrine in Aichi Prefecture. Locals affectionately call them “Yutoku-san”. The Inari, Japanese fox spirits known as kami, is a very popular deity in the Shinto religion. They are known to bestow fertility, good harvest, rice, resources, and prosperity.

The shrine was established in 1687 by the local lord’s wife and built by the Nabeshima Clan, who were rulers of Saga at the time. Yutoku Inari was built onto very steep slopes on a hill. The main hall stands on 18 meter-tall wooden beams, which are unique from other shrines. Walking along the terrace from the main hall will lead you further into the enchanting wooded hill. Red torii gates are built in various sections with little shrines dotted along the path. After walking for 10 minutes, you will discover a small Okunoin shrine at the top of the hill and gorgeous views looking out to the city of Kashima and the Ariake Sea.

The famous red torii gates are seen in various sections on the temple ground

The famous red torii gates are seen in various sections on the temple ground

You will find many walking trails to explore aside from the beautiful traditional Japanese garden, famous for its lovely peonies, which bloom around April and January. The Yutoku Inari Shrine is part of Higashiyama Park, a public park famous for its azalea flowers. This is a beautiful sight not to be missed during its blooming season in April.

Aside from the gardens, there is also an ancient museum called the Yutoku Museum, which houses precious treasures of the Yutoku Inari Shrine. The museum also displays different armours worn by generations of feudal lords, as well as ceremonial swords and many local artworks.

 

How to Get There

The best way to get here is by train. Get off at Hizen-Kashima Station on the JR Nagasaki Main Line. Using the direct limited express train, you can reach your destination in one hour. The cost is around 2500-3000 yen from Hakata Station or Nagasaki. There are one to two trains every hour. Once you’ve arrived, the shrine is just a 10-minute bus ride which you can take from Yutoku Bus station for 320 yen (one-way). Alternatively, you can choose to take a taxi which will cost around 1600 yen.

Address/Location: 1855 Furueda, Kashima 849-1321, Saga Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 954 62 2151
Fee: Free
Opening Hours: Always Open

Shrine Garden
Opening Hours: 9am to 4:30pm everyday
Fee: 200 yen

Shrine Museum
Opening Hours: 9am to 4:30pm
Fee: 300 yen

 

Accommodation

1. Ryokan Oomuraya, Ureshino
Address: 848 Shimojuku Ureshino-machi, Ureshino, Saga-ken, Japan
Phone: +81 954 43 1234
Website: http://www.oomuraya.co.jp/

2. Hotel Kasuien, Ureshino
Address: 333 Ureshinomachi OazaKo Iwayagawachi, Ureshino, Saga, 843-0304, Japan
Phone: +81 954 42 2111
Website: http://www.kasuien.co.jp/

 

7. Arita and Imari Town in Saga

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For pottery and porcelain lovers, Saga Prefecture will be a treat. Famous for its beautiful pottery, visitors can find the best in the townships of Arita and Imari. The origins of Japan’s porcelain can be traced back to 400 years ago when the essential mineral called kaolin was discovered at a local mountain.

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It was said that the kilns at Arita were produced the most beautiful porcelains. However, legend has it that this was discovered by a Korean potter who later on started producing the Korean-style blue and white porcelains called Shoki-Imari. Later on, in the mid-17th century, Chinese refugees in northern Kyushu introduced the over glaze colouring technique to Arita.

The beautiful mountainous village of Okawachiyama in Imari

The beautiful mountainous village of Okawachiyama in Imari

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As new technologies were introduced, the porcelain industry became better and stronger than their contemporary pottery counterparts. Japanese porcelain became an extremely valuable resource that is highly sought after all over the world and a major Japanese export.

The two main places that produce these wonderful porcelains are in Arita town and the mountainous village of Okawachiyama in Imari. Imari is the port where the finished products are shipped out.

Some of the must-visit places in Arita are the Kyushu Ceramic Museum, Zwinger Palace, and the Arita Ceramic Art Museum. For more information and other interesting places around the Arita township, please go to: http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e8302.html.

Okawachiyama Village is another pottery haven. This is where the first Japanese porcelain was produced  after the discovery of the kaolin mineral. This small isolated village is located just outside of central Imari.

 

How to Get There

Arita
By Train – Take the JR limited express “Midori” to Arita from Hakata. It is a 90-minute journey and costs about 3000 yen (one-way). Alternatively, you can take the local train on JR Sasebo Line, from Saga to Kami-Arita, which is about 50-60 minutes.

Okawachiyama in Imari
You can take the bus from Imari Station, which leaves every two hours to Okawachiyama. It is a 15-minute ride costing only 150 yen (one-way). You can also take a 10-minute taxi ride for 1800 yen (one-way). Another option is to take the JR Chikuhi Line from Karatsu, which takes about an hour and costs 650 yen (one-way). The frequency of the trains are one every 1-3 hours.

 

Accommodation

There are many hotels in central Imari, but none in Okawachiyama Village. Below are two examples. We recommend you do further research to choose a hotel that suits your requirements.

1. Quintessa Hotel Sasebo
Address: 857-0055 Nagasaki, Sasebo, Minatomachi 5-24, Japan
Phone: +81 956 24 0200
Website: http://quintessahotels.com/sasebo/

2. Forest Inn Imari
Address: 1704-1 Ko Ozato Niricho, Imari 848-0032, Saga Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 955 23 1001
Website: Http://www.forest-inn-imari.com/

 

8. Glover Garden in Nagasaki

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Glover Garden is a beautiful open-air museum located on a hill overlooking the beautiful Nagasaki city harbour. Here, you will find an old western-style mansion called the Glover Residence. There is also a tea house in the Glover Residence so that you can enjoy a drink while taking in the gorgeous scenery.

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The beautiful view of the Nagasaki city harbour at Glover Garden museum

The beautiful view of the Nagasaki city harbour at Glover Garden museum

Besides the Glover Residence, there are also other mansions on this park that stand as reminders of the Western residents that used to live on this island during the 19th century. For example, there is a mansion that used to belong to British merchants William Alt and Frederick Ringer, as well as a Scottish merchant who were fortunate to be accepted by the locals and live in that region.

 

How to Get There

Once you are in Nagasaki, take the tram and get off at Ouratenshudo-shita tram station. It is just a 5-minute walk from the tram station, and the entrance of the garden is located next to a Catholic Church called Oura.

Address/Location: 8-1 Minamiyamatemachi, Nagasaki 850-0931, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 95 822 8223
Entrance Fee: 610 yen
Opening Hours: 8am to 6pm
Summer & Peak Season: The park closes at 9pm or 9:30pm
Website: http://www.glover-garden.jp/

 

Accommodation

There are many hotels ranging from the luxurious to the more budgeted ones all over Nagasaki. It is best that you do further research to find what suits your needs and budget. Here are two examples.

1. Crowne Plaza ANA Nagasaki Gloverhill, Nagasaki
Address: 1-18 Minamiyamate-machi, Nagasaki, Nagasaki-ken, 850-0931, Japan
Phone: +81 95 818 6601
Website: https://goo.gl/hokdSZ

2. Hotel Monterey Nagasaki
Address: 1-22 Oura-machi, Nagasaki, Nagasaki-ken, 850-0918, Japan
Phone: +81 95 827 7111
Website: https://www.hotelmonterey.co.jp/nagasaki/

 

9. Huis Ten Bosch in Nagasaki

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Known as the Little Holland of Japan, this recreated Dutch town is the central feature of the Huis Ten Bosch theme park. The park is named after a member of the Dutch royal family who once resided here. With traditional windmills, charming canals, colourful flower gardens, and Dutch architecture, visiting Huis Ten Bosch will make you feel as if you have stepped into Holland.

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Many visitors come here to stroll around the beautiful park, take a relaxing boat tour around the canals, and enjoy the amazing amusement parks. There are also many restaurants and cafes you can dine and savour from, and, of course, shopping!

When the sun goes down, Huis Ten Bosch illuminates into a kingdom of light

When the sun goes down, Huis Ten Bosch illuminates into a kingdom of light

The park is divided into two zones: the Theme Park Zone and the Harbour Zone. Both zones feature many entertainment outlets and attractions. Some are free, but you may need to pay a fee for others. If you have a regular admission ticket, you are allowed to enter both zones.

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The majority of the attractions can be found in the Theme Park Zone. Here, you will find 3D theatres, a haunted house, a Ferris wheel, a mirror maze, and a replica of the Domtoren (Dom Tower) which has a deck that provides an awesome panoramic view of the park.

The attractions in the Harbour Zone consist of a theatre and a replica of the Huis Ten Bosch Palace that also doubles as an exquisite art museum.

There are also several European-style accommodation located around the park. For example, there is the Hotel Europe with fine restaurants, and Hotel Amsterdam, which is located inside the Theme Park Zone. Hotel guests get special discounted tickets to enter the Theme Park Zone.

 

How to Get There

From Fukuoka:
For 3800 yen, you can take the JR limited express train from Hakata Station to Huis Ten Bosch Station, which leaves every hour and takes about 110 minutes. There are five trains per day that travel directly to stations. Others trains will require transiting to another local train at Haiki Station. This, however, is just a 6-minute ride.

From Nagasaki:
Take the JR Seaside Liner from Nagasaki Station to Huis Ten Bosch Station. It is a 75-minute journey that will cost you 1470 yen. The trains leave every hour.

From Nagasaki Airport:
From the airport, the best and most convenient way to get to the theme park is by high-speed boat. It takes about 50 minutes and costs 1960 yen.

Address/Location: Hausutenbosu-machi, Sasebo 859-3243, Nagasaki Prefecture
Phone: +81 956 27 0001
Entrance Fee: 5,000 Kip (US$ 0.62) for foreigners
Parking Fee: 6700 yen (Park admission + Unlimited entry to most attractions); 4200 yen (Park admission only); Paid attractions in the park costs around 300 to 1000 yen.
Opening Hours: There are no specific opening hours for this place. It is open all year round every day.
Website: http://english.huistenbosch.co.jp/

 

Accommodation

There are four main hotels in Huis Ten Bosch. For your reference here are two of them. If you prefer to stay outside the park, you can easily find many hotels all over Nagasaki. We recommend you do further research to find a hotel that suits your needs and budget.

1. Hotel Europe
Address: 859-3243 Nagasaki, Sasebo, Huis Ten Bosch Machi, 7-7, Japan
Phone: +81 570 064 110
Website: http://www.huistenbosch.co.jp/hotels/he/

2. Huis Ten Bosch Hotel Amsterdam
Address: 859-3293 Nagasaki, Sasebo, Huis Tenbosch 7-7, Japan
Phone: +81 570 064 110
Website: http://english.huistenbosch.co.jp/hotel/?mode=hotel&Type=2

 

10. Kurokawa Onsen in Kumamoto

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This is perhaps one of the most attractive hot spring towns in the whole of Japan. Located about 20km north of Mount Aso, Kurokawa Onsen sits in the centre of Kyushu Island. This town has managed to preserve its traditional environment, free from the modern pollution, loud commercialisation, and concrete hotels that are usually found in the cities.

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The enchanting beauty of nature pleasantly dominates the landscapes of Kurokawa’s township. The houses and buildings blend in harmoniously with nature, as the colours and materials used resemble nature itself. Situated in the forested valley is its town centre, which you can easily explore by foot. Along the lanes are rows and rows of ryokan, public bathhouses, little shops, and cafes. There is also a small shrine and some bridges that cross over the river leading to the entrances of a few ryokan. A stroll along this town is so relaxing that you will easily fall for this enchanting little town.

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Besides its beautiful town, Kurokawa is also famous for its unmatched outdoor baths known as rotenburo. Some of these baths actually sit right beside a river, and some are impressively big. Larger baths with good views are mostly located outside the town.

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If you choose to stay in this highly recommended township, you will be able to enjoy your hotel’s own ryokan baths at any time. If not, you can still explore the baths during the daytime, or pay for a package “tour of outdoor baths” called Rotemburo Meguri. For 1300 yen, you will receive a wooden pass called tegata, which allows you admission to three different ryokan baths of your choice. These passes are valid for six months and can be purchased from the information centre in town or from participating ryokan. Otherwise, it will cost you around 500 yen per bath. Be sure to drop by the information centre for more details. It is also good to know if any ryokan you are planning to visit is open or close.

Kurokawa is such a breath of fresh air from the polluted concrete jungles of the city. It is a quaint little town, existing harmoniously with nature. Definitely an experience not be missed in Kyushu

Kurokawa is such a breath of fresh air from the polluted concrete jungles of the city. It is a quaint little town, existing harmoniously with nature. Definitely an experience not be missed in Kyushu

 

How to Get There

By Bus
Take a direct highway bus, which operates twice a day from Fukuoka (Hakata Station, Tenjin Bus Center and Fukuoka Airport), to Kurokawa Onsen. The 2.5-hour journey costs 3090 yen.

By Train (for rail pass holders)
Although Kurokawa Onsen is not connected by rail, you can still use your Japan Rail Pass and Kyushu Rail Pass, which saves you a few yen when you take the highway bus mentioned above. It is best to take the highway bus at Hita station, instead of Hakata, as it will only a 70-minute for 1860 yen (one-way). This bus service runs twice a day.

NOTE: Fees and schedules are subject to change, so do check online before making your trip. Here are the location and contact details of the Kurokawa Onsen’s Tourist Information Centre.

Address/Location: 869-2402 Kumamoto Prefecture, Aso District, 6594−3, Japan
Phone: +81 967 44 0076
Entrance Fee: NIL
Opening Hours: 9am – 6pm
Website: http://www.kurokawaonsen.com/eng_new/

 

Accommodation

There are several ryokan accommodation available all over Kurokawa Onsen. Below are two examples. However, we recommend that you do further research to choose a ryokan accommodation that suits your needs and budget.

1. Ryokan Wakaba
Address: 869-2402 Kumamoto, Minamioguni, Manganji 6431, Japan
Phone: +81 967 44 0500
Website: https://goo.gl/D1e6ra

2. Kurokawa Onsen Oyado Noshiyu
Address: 869-2402 Kumamoto, Minamioguni, Manganji 6591-1, Japan
Phone: +81 967 44 0308
Website: http://noshiyu.jp/

 

11. Mount Aso in Kumamoto

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The great Mount Aso is a huge active volcano that sits in the centre of Kyushu Island. Several huge eruptions in the past have made its ancient caldera into one of the world’s largest at a diameter of 25km and a circumference of over 100km. Within its caldera, there are several small townships and large rice fields. Horses and cows can be seen grazing on the green grassy slopes, making it a picturesque scene.

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The currently active peaks are in the centre of the caldera, but the highest point is the summit of Mt. Taka, which stands at 1592 meters above sea level. Visitors are allowed to access and view the main crater. However, due to high levels of volcanic gases, it may be closed at times, so it is best to check before heading there. If you have respiratory problems, it is best not to visit the crater.

 

How to Get There

You can get to Mount Aso by bus, which takes about 30-40 minutes, from JR Aso Station to Nakadake Crater. A bus leaves every 1-2 hours, and it costs 650 yen (one-way). You will not be able to use your Japan Rail Pass for this. Buses will only go as far as the Asosan Nishi Station. From there, take a short cable car ride or ropeway ride to the crater. This costs 1200 yen (round-trip). Another alternative is to take a 30-minute walk to the crater. There are parking lots next to the crater, but you will need to pay a 600 yen toll if you decide to drive there.

Take Note: Do remember to check the volcano’s current state before you visit as it may be closed off due to volcanic activity.

Address/Location: Mount Aso, Kurokawa, Aso, Kumamoto Prefecture 869-2225, Japan
Phone: +81 967 34 0411
Entrance Fee: 860 yen
Opening Hours: 9am to 5pm (last entry is at 4:30pm) Closed on the fourth Tuesday of every month
Website: http://www.kyusanko.co.jp/aso/lang_en/

 

Accommodation

There are quite a few accommodation near Mount Aso. However, it would still be good for you to do further research on the accommodation so that you can find one that suits your budget and requirements. Here are two examples of nearby accommodation.

1. Aso no Shiki
Address: 869-2611 Kumamoto, Aso, Ichinomiya, Sakanashi 3030-2, Japan
Phone: NIL
Website: https://goo.gl/tLbtBd

2. Aso Base Backpackers
Address: 869-2225 Kumamoto, Aso, Kurokawa 1498, Japan
Phone: +81 967 34 0408
Website: http://www.aso-backpackers.com/index.html

 

12. Tochoji Temple in Fukuoka

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Tochoji Temple is one of the oldest temples in Japan and the head temple of the Kyushu sect of Shingon Buddhism. It is also known as Nangakuzan and is dedicated to a famous monk called Kobo-Daishi or Kukai. Kobo-daishi built Tochoji Temple after returning from China with a strong desire to spread Tantric Buddhism in Japan.

The temple was originally located by the sea, but it was later relocated inland to its current location by Kuroda Tadayuki, the second lord of Fukuoka province. Later, it became the family temple of the Kuroda family, who helped maintain the sanctity of the temple. This is why you will find the graves of the second lord Tadayuki, the third Mitsuyuki, as well as the eighth Harutaka, on the temple grounds.

Tochoji Temple is considered a historical site in Kyushu, and it is surrounded by breathtaking mountains that are dotted with many other traditional temples. Inside the temple, you will find a Senjukan non-Buddhist statue of the temple from the Heian era.

You will also come across a hut, called Rokkakudo, which houses sacred sutra texts placed in revolving bookshelves, and is considered a very important part of the temple.

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In the temple, you will also find a magnificent 10.8-meter wood carving of a Buddha statue. Work on the largest Buddha statue in Japan began in 1988 but took four years to complete. The backing behind the Buddha, called the “ring of light”, stands at 16.1 meters high and has hundreds of little Buddha images carved on it.

 

How to Get There

Depending on where you are staying in Hakata, you can probably just walk to the temple. Otherwise, the best way to get to this temple is by taking the subway train. The temple is located directly across from Gion subway exit.

Address/Location: 2-4, Gokusho-machi, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka, Japan
Phone: +81 92 291 4459
Entrance Fee: Free
Opening Hours: 9am – 5pm daily
Website: NIL

 

Accommodation

There are many different types of accommodation in Fukuoka, and they range from the luxurious five-star hotels to simple budget motels. Below are two accommodation within walking distance to the temple. We recommend that you do further research to find the one that suits your plans, budget, and requirements.

1. Hotel Nikko Fukuoka, Fukuoka
Address: 2-18-25 Hakata-ekimae, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka-Ken, 812 0011, Japan
Phone: +81 92 482 1111
Website: http://www.hotelnikko-fukuoka.com/

2. Dormy Inn Hakata Gion Natural Hot Spring, Fukuoka
Address: 1-12 Reisen-Cho Hakata-Ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka-ken, 812-0039, Japan
Phone: +81 92-271-5489
Website: http://www.hotespa.net/hotels/hakata/

 

13. Rokugo Manzan Temples in Oita

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The Kunisaki Peninsula’s landscape is made up of the magnificent Mount Futago, standing at 721 meters tall in the centre with lush valleys surrounding it. The region’s tranquil countryside with its many temples and several shrines has been divided into six areas. Collectively, it is called Rokugo Manzan, which literally means “Six Towns Full Mountain”.

Rokugo Manzan has a unique religious culture consisting of elements from Buddhism, Shinto, and mountain worship. This can be seen in the many temples and the Usa Shrine in this peninsula. A prominent feature is beautiful stone statues of the Buddha and local deities or guardians.

Futagoji Temple

Futagoji Temple

Near the peak of Mount Futago is Futagoji Temple with a history that dates back more than 1300 years. Its temple grounds are covered with a huge area of natural forested slopes that are part of the mountain. Stone gravel paths lead to several temple halls and home to various deities.

Futagoji Temple - Gomado Hall

Futagoji Temple – Gomado Hall

One of them is the Gomado Hall, which is dedicated to a protector of Buddhism, named Fudomyoo. The Okunoin Hall, on the other hand, enshrines the thousand-armed Bodhisattva of Compassion.

Fukiji Temple

Fukiji Temple

Buddha Amida or Amitabha inside Fukiji Temple

Buddha Amida or Amitabha inside Fukiji Temple

Another temple worth visiting is the Fukiji Temple, which is located about 15 km south-west of Futagoji. The main hall of the Fukiji Temple is a national treasure. It is the oldest wooden structure existing in Kyushu and dates back to the Heian Period. Fukiji Temple is dedicated to an intricate wooden Amida Buddha or Buddha Amitabha. The Fukiji Temple hall was ranked as one of the top three Amida Buddha halls in all of Japan.

Makiodo Temple

Makiodo Temple

Buddha Amida or Amitabha with the four heavenly kings in Makiodo Temple

Buddha Amida or Amitabha with the four heavenly kings in Makiodo Temple

Then, there is the Makiodo Temple, located just by the main road about 5km south of Fukiji. Besides the many beautiful wooden Amida Buddha statues, there are the four heavenly kings and Fudomyoo in its treasure house. There was a fire about 700 years ago which caused the loss of the original temple hall. Fortunately, many of the wooden Buddha statues were rescued.

Kumano Magaibutsu large stone carvings

Kumano Magaibutsu large stone carvings

Kumano Magaibutsu stone carving Dainichi Buddha

Kumano Magaibutsu stone carving Dainichi Buddha

The Kumano Magaibutsu stone Buddha is located less than 5km from the south of Makiodo. You will also discover two of the largest stone carvings in Japan etched into the walls of a cliff. They present an image of Fudomyoo at 8 meters tall, and an image of Dainichi Buddha, which is 7 meters tall. It is unclear when these stone carvings were created, but a rough estimate places them in the late Heian period. You will need to take a 20-30 minute walk through the forest in order to see these giant stone carvings.

If you are a Buddhist, this is definitely a bucket list destination not to be missed.

 

How to Get There

It is not easy to get to these temples as there are no reliable public transports to Kinisaki Peninsula. The best way to get here is by renting a car, which can be easily found at Oita Airport, and in Usa and Beppu.

Alternatively, you can hire a taxi from Oita Airport. There are several taxi tours which includes visits to some of the temples. They charge anywhere from 9,000 to 15,000 yen per taxi that seats four to five people. Do take note that your taxi driver may not be able to speak or understand English.

Once you have found your way to the peninsula, there is a daily guided tour bus which you can take for 3,050 yen to 5,650 yen, depending on which station you board and get off. The tour bus covers the above-mentioned temples and the Usa Shrine, and departs from Oita Station. It also stops at Beppu and Usa Stations before heading to the shrines and temples, and then returns to Beppu and Usa via Oita Airport.

1. Futagoji Temple
Address/Location: 873-0356 Oita Prefecture, Kunisaki, Akimachi Futago, 1548, Japan
Phone: +81 978 65 0253
Entrance Fee: 300 yen
Opening Hours: 8am to 5pm (8:30am to 4:30pm from December to February)
Admission is not allowed 30 minutes before closing
Website: http://www.futagoji.jp/

2. Fukiji Temple
Address/Location: Tashibu Fuki, Bungotakada 879-0841, Oita Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 978 26 3189
Entrance Fee: 300 yen
Opening Hours: 8:30am to 4:30pm
Website: NIL

3. Makiodo
Address/Location: Tashibu Manaka, Bungotakada 879-0852, Oita Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 978 26 2075
Entrance Fee: 300 yen
Opening Hours: 8:30am to 5:30pm (Close at 5pm from November to April)
Website: http://www.makiodo.jp/

4. Kumano Magaibutsu
Address/Location: Tashibu Hirano, Bungotakada 879-0853, Oita Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 978 26 2070
Entrance Fee: 300 yen
Opening Hours: 8am to 5pm (Closes at 4:30pm from November to April)
Website: NIL

 

Accommodation

There are several ryokan style of accommodation near the Rokugo Manzan Temples in Oita to choose from. However, we recommend that you do further research on the types of accommodation you prefer based on your requirements. Below are two examples.

1. Kaisei Ryokan Kaifso
Address: 452 Kunisaki-Machi Tsurugawa, Kunisaki City, Oita 873-0503, Japan
Phone: +81 978 72 0059
Website: http://kaikisou.com/

2. Akane no Sato
Address: 2064-3 Akane, Kunimi, Kunisaki City, Oita 872-1405, Japan
Phone: +81 978 82 1571
Website: http://www.gokunisaki.com/akane-no-sato/

 

14. Hells (Jigoku) in Beppu, Oita

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Jigoku means “hells” in English, which may be an apt description of these hot springs in Beppu. They are definitely not for bathing but for viewing only as some of them are above boiling point. They have been beautifully landscaped to make them presentable to visitors.

There are seven hot hells with natural hot ponds that gush out water as hot as 150°C. Five of the hells are in the district of Kannawa, and two are in a more remote district called Shibaseki.

1. Umi Jigoku

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This is the “sea hell” and is considered one of the more beautiful hells in Beppu. The spacious landscape features a turquoise blue boiling pond, and smaller orange-coloured hells as well as a pond with lotus flowers.

2. Oniishibozu Jigoku

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This hell has a pond that emerged from boiling mud pools, which is what it is named after. Oniishibozu Jigoku, or “grey mud bubbles”, spouts out 99°C bubbles that are said to look like the shaven heads of monks. Visitors can enjoy a foot bath with clear water, or a public bath with various pools located adjacent to the hell. The entrance fee is 620 yen.

3. Shiraike Jigoku

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True to its name, Shiraike, or “white pond hell”, produces milky-white water from its hot spring. Its waters have been measured at 95°C temperature. It has been landscaped to resemble a tranquil Japanese Zen garden.

4. Kamado Jigoku

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This is the “cooking pot hell”. It consists of several boiling ponds with a huge red demon statue which seems to be the cook in this hell. Visitors can enjoy some hot spring water with provided hand and foot baths. You can also try some of the snacks and puddings that were cooked using the steam from the hot spring.

5. Oniyama Jigoku

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6. Chinoike Jigoku

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It is called “blood pond hell” for a reason. It has a hot pond with red water with steam rising from it. This is the oldest hell pond. With waters measuring 78°C, there are signs encouraging visitors to soak their feet. There is a special ointment sold here that is made from local clay, which apparently helps to treat skin problems.

7. Tatsumaki Jigoku

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Tatsumaki, or “the spout hell”, is considered a natural treasure of Beppu. This is one of Japan’s few geysers, and it erupts every 30-40 minutes for up to 10 minutes. The spout of hot boiling water can reach 50 meters high if not for the stone slab t placed above it. Tatsumak is also the hottest hell among all the hot hell ponds with water temperatures at 150°C.

 

How to Get There

You can get to the five hot hells in the Kannawa district rather easily as there are buses that depart every 15 minutes from JR Beppu Station. Take bus number 5, 7, and 9, as they are the fastest, and get down at Kannawa bus terminal. From the bus terminal, you can walk to all the five hells.

To get yourself to the other two remaining hells, catch bus number 16/16A. They run twice every hour from Kannawa to Shibaseki.

Address/Location: 559-1 Kannawa, Beppu 874-0045, Oita Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 977 66 1577
Entrance Fee: 400 yen per hell / 2000 yen for all seven hells
Opening Hours: 8am to 5pm
Website: http://www.beppu-jigoku.com/

 

Accommodation

There are many different accommodation in Beppu area, so be sure to do further research so you can find one that suits your budget and requirements. Below are two examples that are near the seven hot hells.

1. Tashiro Annex
Address: 2330-1 Miyanora, Kumage-gun Yakushima-cho 891-4205, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 345 40 2658
Website: https://www.booking.com/hotel/jp/tashiro-bekkan.html?aid=330843;lang=en

2. Hotel Sansuikan, Beppu
Address: 628-1 Tsurumi, Beppu, Oita-ken, 8740840, Japan
Phone: + +856 209 8548500
Website: https://goo.gl/VKkVsf

 

15. Usuki Stone Buddhas in Oita

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You will find the Usuki Stone Buddha about 5km south-west of Usuki’s city centre. These ancient stone Buddhas, sculpted into a cliff, presents an astonishing view. Most Buddha statues in Japan are made from wood or metal. These stone Buddhas, which can only be found in Usuki, is the rare exception, which explains why they were chosen as national treasures of Japan.

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The beautifully carved stone Buddhas are believed to have been created during the late Heian period (794-1185). They are carved on volcanic rock, which is believed to have come from the nearby Mount Aso. The rock is soft, which makes it ideal for sculpting. However, because it is soft, the humidity levels around the area also makes them prone to erosion. Due to this, great efforts have been made to preserve them. Shelters have been built over them to protect them from the elements.

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Just a 5-minute walk across the field from the stone Buddhas will lead you to a quaint little temple called Mangatsuji Temple. Two stone sculptures of Nio guardians stand guard on each side of the temple’s entrance. Inside the temple, you will find a few more stone sculptures. One of them is the sculpture of a Buddhist priest, who is believed to be the artist who sculpted the stone Buddhas.

 

How to Get There

You can get here by catching a bus from Usuki Station to Usuki Sekibutsu bus stop, which takes about 20 minutes and costs 310 yen (one-way). However, do take note that these buses only run once every 1-2 hours. Hence, getting there via taxi or renting a car would be faster and more convenient. It costs around 2000 yen (one-way) from Usuki Station, or 1500 yen from Kami-Usuki Station. You can find a car rental service near Kami-Usuki Station, or at Beppu or Oita.

Address/Location: Fukata, Usuki, Oita Prefecture 875-0064, Japan
Phone: +81 972 65 3300
Entrance Fee: 540 yen (Stone Buddhas only) Or 1100 yen (includes Inaba Residence and entry to two museums in the city centre)
Opening Hours: 6am to 7pm (Close at 6pm from October to March)
Website: http://sekibutsu.com/

 

Accommodation

There are many different types of accommodation available near Usuki Stone Buddhas in Oita. It is a good idea to do some research to choose one based on your budget and requirements. Below are two examples.

1. Hotel Route-Inn Saiki Ekimae
Address: 2-6-40 Ekimae, Saiki, Oita-ken, 876-0803, Japan
Phone: +81 972 20 5252
Website: http://www.route-inn.co.jp/search/hotel/index_hotel_id_630

2. New Hotel Tamaya, Usuki
Address: 2573-24 Oaza Kaizoe, Usuki, Oita-Ken, 875-0042, Japan
Phone: +81 972 632 898
Website: http://www.new-tamaya.com/

 

16. Takachiho in Miyazakia

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Located in the northern Miyazaki Prefecture, Takachiho is a charming little town with a population of 12,589. Its breathtaking landscape presents amazing natural wonders, majestic mountains, and lush green forests. This little township is steeped in Japanese mythology and has many ancient stories to share. Legend has it that the Shinto Sun Goddess, Amaterasu, hid in the caves of Takachiho so that she could escape her brother’s cruel pranks.

Some also claim that this is the landing place of the god Ninigi no Mikoto, grandson of Amaterasu, instead of Mount Takachiho-no-mine. Legend has it that he came down from heaven to establish the lineage of Japanese emperors.

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Takachiho is known to be a place filled with profound spirituality and natural wonders. It is definitely one of the best places to visit here in Kyushu. Two other highly-recommended places to explore for a spiritual experience are the Takachiho Gorge and the Amano Iwato Shrine.

 

How to Get There

The best way to get to Takachiho is by train, which is covered by the Japan Rail Pass. From Fukuoka (Hakata Station), catch the JR limited express trains that go via Oita to Nobeoka. It is a 4-hour journey and costs 8000 yen (one-way with one connection per hour). After that, hop on a bus to Takachiho which takes about 90 minutes and costs 1790 yen (one-way with one running per hour).

Address/Location: Takachiho is a town in Nishiusuki District, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: NIL
Entrance Fee: NIL
Opening Hours: NIL

 

Accommodations

There are many different types of accommodation in Takachiho, so it’s best if you did further research to find one that suits your budget and requirements. Below are two examples.

1. Takachiho B&B Ukigumo
Address: 882-1101 Miyazaki, Takachiho, Mitai 983-7, Japan
Phone: +81 982 82 2703
Website: http://www.takachiho-ukigumo.com/

2. Kokumin Syukusya Hotel Takachiho
Address: 882-1101 Miyazaki, Takachiho, Takachiho-cho, Mitai 1037-4, Japan
Phone: NIL
Website: https://goo.gl/NKK4Dy

 

17. Takachiho Gorge in Miyazaki

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For all adventurers and nature lovers, Takachiho Gorge cannot be left out of your itinerary. Carved by the Gokase River, it leaves a narrow gap that cuts through rock cliffs lining the gorge and giving it a mystical experience as you slowly paddle through. As you pass these cliffs, you will be able to see the cooled basaltic lava formation that looks like the scales of a dragon.

The main highlight here is the magnificent 17-meter Minainotaki waterfall. With lush green foliage amongst its grey cliffs, the view is almost magical.

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There are two ways to enjoy Takachiho Gorge. You can view it from below by rowing a boat through the calm and smooth river. Boats can be easily rented at the south end of the gorge. This route is highly recommended as it allows you to have a close-up view of the cliffs as well as the waterfall.

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The second way is to experience Takachiho Gorge from above. You can hike along the paved path, which runs along the edge of the gorge, and enjoy the scenic view along the way. The trail can also lead you down to the river and continues for another 1km to lead you to Takachiho Shrine.

 

How to Get There

Located just outside the town centre, it is about a 30-40 minute walk from the Takachiho Bus Center. The best way to get to Takachiho Gorge would be to rent a car or hire a taxi from Nobeoka City, around Mount Aso, or Kumamoto or Miyazaki Airports.

Another option is to rent an electric bicycle near the Takachiho Bus Centre for 300 yen an hour, or 1500 yen for a day.

There is a tourist bus that you can take from the bus station. It will take you to the gorge and other attractions on weekends and public holidays. However, this bus does not operate on weekdays.

Address/Location: Mukoyama, Takachiho, Nishiusuki District, Miyazaki Prefecture 882-1103, Japan
Phone: NIL
Entrance Fee: NIL
Boat Rental Services: 8:30am to 5pm (last departure is at 4:30pm)
Opening Hours: NIL
Website: NIL

 

Accommodation

There are many different types of accommodation near Takachiho Gorge ranging from luxurious 5-star to budget hotels, so there is one to suit every budget. Below are two examples.

1. Hanare No Yado Kamigakure
Address: 882-1101 Miyazaki, Takachiho, Mitai 1120-5, Japan
Phone: NIL
Website: https://landmarkmekongriversidehotel.com/en/redefining-luxury/

2. Kokumin Syukusya Hotel Takachiho
Address: 882-1101 Miyazaki, Takachiho, Takachiho-cho, Mitai 1037-4, Japan
Phone: NIL
Website: https://goo.gl/wfGD57

 

18. Udo Shrine in Miyazaki

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Located in the south of Miyazaki City on the Nichinan Coast, Udo Shrine is dedicated to Yamasachihiko, the father of Emperor Jimmu, who is the mythical first emperor of Japan. The shrine is set inside a cave that sits on a cliff-side overlooking the magnificent ocean.

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There are several legendary stories regarding Emperor Jimmu and this cave. Some say he was born here, and some say he visited this place as a baby. There is one story that everyone agrees on, though. Locals believe that the breast-shaped rocks seen on the cave walls were what nourished the young Emperor.

Hence, it is said that drinking the water dews from these rocks would help with fertility, childbirth, and nursing. The shrine is also thought to bestow good fortune to couples and newlyweds.

Rocks at the bottom of the temple are marked as targets

Rocks at the bottom of the temple are marked as targets

The small ceramic balls, undama are used to aim into the rock target. It is believed that if you succeed, it will bring you good luck!

The small ceramic balls, undama are used to aim into the rock target. It is believed that if you succeed, it will bring you good luck!

Step onto the terrace that overlooks the grand sea and take a look down below. You will see rocks with holes marked as targets with a rope around them. People will try to aim for the opening using small ceramic undama balls, known as lucky balls. It is believed that landing an undama in the target brings you good luck. Women throw with their right hand and the men will use their left hand.

 

How to Get There

The best way to get to Udo Shrine is by renting a car. Another option would be to take a bus from Miyazaki Station. The 90-minute journey costs 1480 yen (one-way). The bus also stops at Aoshima. You can get off at the Udo Jingu bus stop, and walk 10 minutes to the shrine.

Address/Location: 3232 Miyaura, Nichinan 887-0101, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 987 29 1001
Entrance Fee: NIL
Opening Hours: 6am to 7pm (from April to September); 7am to 6pm (from October to March)
Website: http://www.udojingu.com/

 

Accommodation

Below are two suggested accommodation near Udo Shrine. We recommend that you do your own research so that you can find lodgings that suit your needs and budget.

1. Hotel J’s Nichinan Resort
Address: 2821-1 Gonohara Ko, Nichinan 889-2402, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 987 55 3333
Website: http://www.jsgroup.jp/

2. Kiraku Obi
Address: 4-2-20-1 Obi, Nichinan, Miyazaki-ken, 889-2535, Japan
Phone: +81 987 25 1333
Website: https://goo.gl/P3CFK8

 

19. Amano Iwato Shrine in Miyazaki

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Takachiho is famous for its legendary Japanese mythological stories. In one of the stories, the Shinto sun goddess, Amaterasu, hid in a cave to escape her brother’s cruel pranks. She refused to come out, so the world was deprived of her life-giving light source.

All the gods and goddesses gathered here to try to lure Amaterasu out but to no avail. One of the goddesses then performed an outrageous dance that made all the gods roar in laughter. Curious, Amaterasu left her cave to see what was going on and when she came out, she brought her light back to the world.

Situated around 10km outside of central Takachiho, Amano Iwato Shrine, or Amano Iwato Jinja, was built near the cave where Amaterasu hid. All the main buildings of the shrine are built on the opposite side of the cave.

The cave is not accessible, but there is an observation deck behind the shrine’s main building. If you wish to go onto the deck, you will need to inquire at the entrance of the shrine. A priest will usually give you a guided tour in Japanese.

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Take a short walk down from the shrine and you will reach a river. Continue on a little further, you will discover many little stones that have been neatly stacked up along the river by previous visitors. It is to mark their pilgrimage to this “sacred spot”. The path will finally lead to a simple shrine that is believed to be the very cave where all the gods gathered to discuss how they can lure Amaterasu out of hiding.

 

How to Get There

Located 10km outside of central Takachiho, you can take a bus from Takachiho Bus Centre to the location of the shrine. The train runs once every 2-3 hours, and it is a short 15-minute journey for 300 yen (one-way). Another option would be to take a taxi that costs around 2500 yen (one-way).

Address/Location: 882-1621 Miyazaki Prefecture, Nishiusuki District, Takachiho, Iwato, 1073 1, Japan
Phone: +81 982 74 8239
Entrance Fee: Free
Opening Hours: (always open)
Website: https://www.gibbonexperience.org/

 

Accommodation

There are several types of accommodation near Amano Iwato Shrine ranging from 5-star hotels to the more budgeted ones. We recommend you do further research to find the right accommodation for you. Here are two examples.

1. Nichinan Kaigan Nango Prince Hotel
Address: Shiroura Nango-cho, Nichinan 889-3204, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 987 64 2111
Website: https://goo.gl/Ghmz7M

2. Kanpo no Yado Nichinan
Address: 2228-1 Hoshikura, Nichinan 889-2533, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan
Phone: NIL
Website: https://goo.gl/k4FeRG

 

20. Shiratani Unsuikyo in Kagoshima

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For nature lovers, this is a beautiful place to visit without much strenuous hiking. Shiratani Unsuikyo Ravine is full of lush, green forest landscapes with several ancient Japanese cedars such as the Nidaiosugi, Kugurisugi, and Yayoisugi.

You will find well-maintained hiking trails along the ravine where you can wander freely, if you choose to do so. The difficulty of the trails varies, but there are signages in English all over the park, so you won’t be left clueless.

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One of the main attractions of the park is that part of it was used as an inspiration for the animated film Mononoke Hime (Princess Mononoke). The artist Oga Kazuo spent lots of her time here sketching the movie’s forests scenes. Explore and be mesmerised by Shiratani Unsuikyo’s beautiful green wilderness.

 

How to Get There

You can get to Shiratani Unsuikyo by renting a car, as it is located 30 minutes from Miyanoura Port.

Besides that, you can also take the bus from Miyanoura Port, which is a 35-minute journey that costs 550 yen (one-way). Buses are not very frequent; you can expect one bus every 2-3 hours.

Address/Location: Kumage-gun Yakushima-cho 891-4200, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81 72 423 4371
Entrance Fee: 300 yen
Opening Hours: Always Open
Website: http://www.uxolao.org/

 

Accommodation

There are several types of accommodation near Shiratani Unsuikyo in Kagoshima ranging from budget to the luxurious hotels. Here are two examples. We recommend you do further research to find the right accommodation that suits your budget and requirements.

1. Remm Kagoshima
Address: 892-0842 Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Higashi Sengokucho 1-32, Japan
Phone: +81 99 224 0606
Website: http://www-a.global.hankyu-hotel.com/remm-kagoshima/

2. Hotel Urbic Kagoshima
Address: 890-0045 Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Take 1-3-1, Japan
Phone: +81 99 214 3588
Website: http://www.urbic.jp/

 

Travel Books on Kyushu

Get the most out of your visit to Kyushu. Before you arrive, read up on some travel books or search online to help you plan your trip better and make your journey more enjoyable. These are two books recommended to help you plan your trip.

 

1. Lonely Planet Kyushu & Okinawa (Travel Guide Chapter)

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Authors: Lonely Planet

“Lonely Planet Kyushu & Okinawa is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you in this region. See where the last samurai made their last stand at Kumamoto Castle, recharge in a riverside rotemburo (outdoor baths) in Kurokawa Onsen or take a ferry to a simpler time on the living museum island of Taketomi-jima, all with your trusted travel companion. Begin your journey now!“

 

2. Rurubu Omotenashi Travel Guide Kyushu

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Author: JTB Publishing

“Learn all about the island of Kyushu and its eight prefectures: Fukuoka, Saga, Nagasaki, Oita, Kumamoto, Kagoshima, and Miyazaki! Want to combine all your destinations into a single trip? Then this is the guide you need. Get info on the best in Kyushu cuisine, including Hakata ramen, Nagasaki champon noodles, Kumamoto ramen, Kagoshima black pork (or kurobuta), Miyazaki free-range chicken, and much, much more.”

 
Sources:

  • http://wikitravel.org/en/Kyushu
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyushu
  • http://www.japan-guide.com/list/e1108.html
  • https://www.thoughtco.com/islands-of-japan-1435071
  • http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Ky%C5%ABsh%C5%AB
  • https://matadornetwork.com/abroad/10-japanese-customs-you-must-know-before-a-trip-to-japan/
  • http://japan-magazine.jnto.go.jp/en/1606_kyushufood.html
  • http://www.welcomekyushu.com/event/?mode=detail&isSpot=1&id=9999901005131
  • https://www.tripadvisor.com.my/
  • http://bookingnow.com/
  • http://www.welcomekyushu.com/

 
For more interesting information:

 

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  1. Anne Ong on Aug 3, 2017 at 9:57 pm

    Love this Wonderful Japan-Kyushu. Beautiful pictures,sceneries and history. Beautiful Buddha statues.I enjoyed reading about their culture and etiquette. We always learn something new by reading up on other cultures and etiquette. Love the foods too. Looks yummy! My Dad used to say to me. Reading is knowledge. Thank you very much Rinpoche and writers for this very beautiful article. Hope for more great articles coming up! 🙂

  2. Jason on Jul 23, 2017 at 1:10 am

    It take some time for me to read this article but it really worth to read. This article really give very details on Kyushu especially on tourist places and the way to get to tourist places and accommodations as well. I like Kamado Jigoku hot spring because it look like demon being cook by the hot spring. This very good educational source to people to become good person. Besides that, temples are always in my travel itinerary, so I would to visit Fukiji and Makiodo temple where a huge Amitabha statue was located inside.
    I will recommend this article my friend because it really informative and sure will help in Kyushu travel itinerary.
    Thanks Reinpoche and others to gather so much information on Kyushu to open our eye on Kyushu.

    Jason

  3. Wai Meng Wan on Jul 20, 2017 at 12:07 am

    There is so much culture and history that can be discovered in Japan. Japan was heavily influenced by China’s history and systems of beliefs. Its great to know some of the etiquette and mannerisms of the Japanese. As far I know the japanese hold on to their culture ever so strongly preserving for their future generations.

  4. Lim Han Nee on Jul 19, 2017 at 6:34 pm

    Kyushu, in southern Japan, is the land of the active volcanic Mt Aso and the haven of natural hot “hell” springs, an unusually fascinating sight of natural wonders! However, its attractions extend beyond these.
    Besides the amazing hot springs, there are ancient temples and shrines -Buddhist, Shinto and Inari -like the Shofukuji Temple in Fukuoka , the very first zen temple in Japan. The gardens are equally fascinating. There is the most breathtakingly beautiful wisteria garden -the Kawachi Fujien Wisteria Garden, with its amazing and unique 80 meter and 220 meter long tunnels, formed by wisteria trees of different hues. Then there is the breathtaking view of a canopy of purple wisteria flowers at the top of the hillside garden!

    Kyushu’s historical and ancient sites are equally fascinating . There are stone Buddhas,some of which seemed to be carved into the rocks, such as the Kumano Magaibutsu stone Buddha . Then there is the archaeological park, the Yoshinogari Park in Saga Prefecture . As for interesting parks, there is the theme park, the Huis Ten Bosch theme park, where you enter an entirely different world known as the little Holland of Japan.
    Kyushu has its own unique historical story of the thwarting of a Mongolian invasion by the sudden arising of fierce typhoons known as the ‘kamikaze’.

    Kyushu has beautiful natural places like the surfer’s paradise visited by big waves and with lovely beaches, the gorgeous Takachiho Gorge as well as lovely mountainous terrain. All in all, in terms of the natural,spiritual and cultural as well as the historical, Kyushi offers a unique experience to all visitors!

  5. Stella Cheang on Jul 17, 2017 at 3:59 pm

    Thank you, Rinpoche, for this comprehensive write up on Kyushu, Japan. At a glance, the beautiful scenery, shrines and quiescence arcitecture of Kyushu looks like the animated movie by Hayao Miyazaki, Spirited Away comes alive! Kyushu preserves the history and culture very well. It can be seen in the way their shrine and being upkeep. Folklores about spirits, divine intervention and attained beings are common and popular in Kyushu. It will be very nice to visit Kyushu to understand more about the culture from the locals.

  6. Vivian Ong on Jul 15, 2017 at 1:31 am

    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing thus article about Kyushu. By reading through this article, Kyushu is indeed a nice place to visit especially the temples and shrines. The scenery is beautiful too with the beautiful flowers blooming. It is also good to give a try to their local food to know about their culture. By reading this article, you will come to notice that Japanese people are polite, have good manners and also preserve their culture strongly.

    With folded palms,
    Vivian

  7. William Chua on Jul 13, 2017 at 5:42 pm

    This is such a detailed article on Kyushu, Japan. Perfect for those who wants to visit the places as all information are included on how to travel to those places of interests and also where to stay. Japan is definitely beautiful with its natural beauty and steep in tradition. The Japanese also preserves their culture and hands them down to their next generation. Despite the modernisation of society, they still maintain their roots. If I ever plan to travel to Kyushu, I will definitely use this article as my guide.

  8. Esther Goh on Jul 13, 2017 at 3:25 pm

    Japan is a beautiful country with its diversity of culture and tradition. The people are very polite and they take pride in keeping their country clean. I have been to Osaka and Kyoto and during my visit there I did not come across any dirty public toilet. This article provides all the details and useful information if one wishes to visit Kyushu. Hopefully one day I may have the chance to visit this lovely place.

    Thank you H.E. Tsem Tulku Rinpoche and his dedicated team for sharing this article with us.

  9. Samfoonheei on Jul 12, 2017 at 11:14 am

    An early center of Japanese civilization, Kyushu offers many historic treasures, modern cities and natural beauty.I have not been to any of the Japanese cities but heard of the beauty of it.Its a expensive country to visit.To explore Kyushu, Japan’s southernmost main island, is a journey to largely unknown, yet divine, places.To visit Kyushu and discover more beautiful sceneries, dine on great delicacies, and enjoy the richness of culture and history is a lifetime experience for everyone.Well i love , a dream for me.
    Wow….there is alot of do and do’nt while visiting Japan a country with many historic treasures, modern cities and natural beauty.
    Thank you Rinpoche for sharing ,very informative for anyone who is planning a trip there.

  10. Lin Mun on Jul 11, 2017 at 9:41 pm

    Wow Kyushu is so beautiful. There are just so many nice parks and temples around. Thank you Rinpoche for sharing this article. It is interesting to know about other countries culture, food and place of interest. Japanese are so courteous. I really wish I can go to Japan to experience it myself.

  11. Fong on Jul 11, 2017 at 2:36 pm

    Japan seems like a country full of tradition and culture. One should really read up on the do’s and don’ts of the country before visiting. What I can gather form here is that calm and quiet is treasured in the Japanese society. There is rich culture everywhere you look.

    Thank you for this article which really helps us to be prepared to when we visit.

  12. Datuk May on Jul 11, 2017 at 1:31 pm

    When my family was in the automobile business, we were the distributor of a Japanese car in Malaysia and I used to visit Japan quite often during those times. My trips were mainly confined to Tokyo and Hiroshima on the island of Hokkaido and never had the opportunity to visit Kyushu.

    Having some experience of Japan, reading this very well presented article, I feel that I have visited Kyushu.

    Kyushu is so well described in this article, from her history to what is of interest to tourist, on customs, social etiquette, places to visit and artworks.

    The diversity and through research of Tsemrinpoch.com articles are amazing and greatly appreciated by more than 10 million people from every corner of the world who have visited and read all the interesting topics published.

    Thank you, H.E. the 25th Tsem Rinpoche and team for this fabulous educational site.

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  • Alice Tay
    Wednesday, Nov 22. 2017 03:25 AM
    Dorje Shugden is an emanation of Manjushri in dhama protector form. Dorje Shugden practice has been passed for over 400 years by the lineage gurus. Our lineage gurus have strong faith and practice Dorje Shugden including H.E. Tsem Tulku Rinpoche, H.H. Kyabje Zong Rinpoche, H.H. Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and H.H. Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche. All these gurus have achieve attainments and now they have returned in perfect human body to continue their previous life dharma works for the benefit of others. If Dorje Shugden is a spirit and can harm H.H. Dalai Lama and other great masters e.g. from other lineage like Sakya and our lineage gurus, the dharma will not grow and spread to the western countries.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/why-cant-the-dalai-lama-bind-dorje-shugden.html



  • Alice Tay
    Tuesday, Nov 21. 2017 01:20 AM
    Dharma Protector practice especially Kawang prayer is very powerful to purify our negative karma that accumulated since our countless past lifetimes. If this karma is not purified, it can manifest as obstacles to our Dharma practice and can hinder our spiritual progress. When we practice diligently, Kawang prayer is very effective to clear and stabilise the mind when doubts and confusion arise. Eventually, we will achieve the ultimate happiness of full enlightenment and no longer need any dharma protector.

    Thank you Rinpoche for your kindness and compassion to give us this practice to liberate us from suffering and toward enlightenment.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/kawang-a-dorje-shugden-confessional-practice.html?nomobile
  • Lin Mun
    Sunday, Nov 19. 2017 10:39 PM
    Amazing to have Dorje Shugden in so many styles. Rinpoche is really creative to create and commission so many types and styles to suit everyone so all of us have a chance to connect and practise Dorje Shugden. Thank you Rinpoche and team for getting all the various beautiful paintings within a short time.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/art-architecture/which-dorje-shugden-style-is-your-favourite.html
  • Lin Mun
    Sunday, Nov 19. 2017 10:19 PM
    Puan Sabariah really has a big heart. She cooks and serves everyone regardless of race as she only wants to bring joy, happiness and warm food to the homeless. It is already not easy to cook for 20 or 30 person but she managed to cook for 300 a day from her apartment and even up to 1,000 during Ramadhan. Her work it a great inspiration to many and great reminder to always love and help people no matter what their background is. And now at 70 years old still continue working to help the refugees. So we also should not give up helping others and don’t use age as an excuse.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/the-malaysian-mother-teresa-of-montreal.html
  • Stella Cheang
    Sunday, Nov 19. 2017 02:37 AM
    I used to hear a few people around me say that they are OCD towards certain triggers. From their description, I was under the impression that OCD means they have low tolerance towards the trigger. With this article clearly stating the symptoms of people with OCD suffering from the obsession that triggers compulsion in doing something, OCD actually is a serious illness. It results in physical or emotional distress. It appears to me that OCD sufferer’s mind are programed to hold onto to a certain perception very strongly. I hope there will be medical help to reduce their fixation so that their quality of life will improve. Thank you for this sharing, Rinpoche.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/understanding-obsessive-compulsive-disorder.html
  • Lin Mun
    Saturday, Nov 18. 2017 09:22 PM
    I feel very sad for the animals and embarrassing at the same time that our national zoo were in such a poor state. Charging RM 30 (with MyKad) and RM50 (without MyKad) per entry is not cheap and this clearly shows that the zoo is not well managed. Animals are already being captured with no freedom and the situation is made worse with poor condition, unsanitary, lack of food and medical assistance. I hope the authority will look into this urgently and take action to rectify the situation.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/animals-vegetarianism/a-living-hell.html
  • Lin Mun
    Saturday, Nov 18. 2017 09:13 PM
    This is indeed a great move from the California authority and passing it as a law. This move will surely reduce the number of puppy mills and reduce the suffering of animals tremendously. Many cats and dogs suffered as most breeders do not maintain and treat the animals poorly. Hopefully more states in United States and other countries will follow suit on this noble act.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/animals-vegetarianism/california-says-pet-stores-can-only-sell-rescued-animals.html
  • Stella Cheang
    Friday, Nov 17. 2017 09:27 AM
    There are three purification practices and Kawang is one of them, most suitable to purify heavy bodily karma as well as clearing and stabilising the mind when doubts or confusion arise in times of conflict or when one is on the verge of giving up on something virtuous. From the sharing by Pastor David, the key to this practice is consistency. Doing the kawang prayer as part of our daily sadhana is akin to building up a strong bond with Dorje Shugden, hence, able to invoke his blessing more effectively.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/buddhas-dharma/kawang-a-dorje-shugden-confessional-practice.html
  • Jason
    Thursday, Nov 16. 2017 11:02 PM
    这是一个很好的佛法教育的视频。仁波切选择了转世到恶劣的环境下成长,但是在这不影响仁波切放弃学习佛法的精神,反而造就了一个菩萨心肠的圣人。仁波切承受很多的痛苦,仁波切不愿意看到他人痛苦,所以发愿要帮助更多流宿街头者给他们援助。
    仁波切的坎坷成长过程给我们一个很正面的教育。环境的影响大不过于我们内心的想法。所以要先修心然后才修行。

    感恩仁波切的教悔使我知道快乐不仅是拥有而是我们付出多少让别人快乐。

    Jason

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/personal-attendant/凡人和圣人的差别.html#comments
  • Jason
    Thursday, Nov 16. 2017 10:18 PM
    This 5 ft Gyenze Statue very stunning and it look so real like a man ride a horse. Gyenze is the increase form of Dorje Shugden and he will bestow us increase in any material or spiritual forms in order to help us in our spiritual path.

    This chapel open 24 hrs and open to public so anyone can visit this chapel anytime. Remember to lit a lotus candle and offer to Gyenze. By doing so, it will lesssen our ignorance and very benefit in our spiritual path.

    Thanks sponsor for contribution in making this 5 ft Gyenze Statue come into real.
    Thanks Rinpoche for conceptualize of this chapel to benefit more people.

    Jason

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/kechara-13-depts/5foot-gyenze-statue-arrives-in-kechara-forest-retreat.html
  • Pastor Adeline Woon
    Thursday, Nov 16. 2017 12:02 AM
    This is an unbiased piece that gives a clear and easy to understand overview of the Dorje Shugden controversy. It is a “as a matter fact” piece that should be accepted easily by the general public.

    It has been a 20 year struggle for the Dorje Shugden practitioners since His Holiness the Dalai Lama imposed a ban on the practice. Families, friends, relatives, couples, etc. were separated due to it. There were many innocent people who were hurt, abandoned and killed because of it. This intended result is totally against the concept of compassion, kindness and equality His Holiness represents.

    Many assumed that all Dorje Shugden practitioners do not like His Holiness and they all demonstrated in his teachings for the last 20 years or so with the New Kadampa Tradition (NKT) founded by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. It has been pointed out distinctively in this article that it is not the case.

    His Eminence the 25th Tsem Rinpoche has always fought the unlawful ban by peaceful and powerful means – writing and education. His Eminence preaches patience and kindness that reflect on his approach in the face of hate speech, threats, etc. He also taught his students to do the same.

    His Eminence’s approach seems to be more effective as people are being educated on the controversy and many turned their minds because of that.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/huffpost-on-dorje-shugden.html
  • Tsem Rinpoche
    Wednesday, Nov 15. 2017 09:35 PM
    Being creative and making things around us interesting makes life so much more bearable.~Tsem Rinpoche


    Spontaneity is the state of realizing boredom does have enemies.~Tsem Rinpoche

    Boredom is the mind that thinks this is it, when it’s not.~Tsem Rinpoche

    Being creative is not a choice, direction or lifestyle but my natural state of mind~Tsem Rinpoche

    Depression is a state of mind only when you are a piece of wood~Tsem Rinpoche

    Losing is just letting yourself know that winning is not the goal but only part of the journey~Tsem Rinpoche


    When you hate or love something extremely, both leads to sufferings.~Tsem Rinpoche

    Being with someone we love or don’t love should not make a difference to a genuine practioner expunged of the I.~Tsem Rinpoche

    Dorje Shugden is not a cause, a movement or religion but who I am, for that person is compassion, love and acceptance.~Tsem Rinpoche
  • Alice Tay
    Wednesday, Nov 15. 2017 03:44 PM
    Thank you Rinpoche sharing this article from Huffington Post. Dorje Shugden ban is getting more people’s attention in the world now. This is a good time for everyone to think, find out more and understand the truth about this issue. This is no longer about the issue of religious but it is more to the fundamental human rights on their freedom and religious that bring much impact in their life.

    Basically, everyone may wish to have their life is improving and getting better. But, it seems that this is not applied to the Tibetan people. The Tibetan people especially Dorje Shugden practitioners have suffered and facing a lot of difficulties, segregation and discrimination for the past 20 years. This situation is getting worse when Sera Jey Monastery introduced an identity badge system to for its monks to indicate that they were not Dorje Shugden practitioner. From that, we can understand those who are practiced Dorje Shugden were not welcome at the monastic university. This is another kind of discrimination happening now in Tibet.

    I humbly wish that those who are given Dorje Shugden practice by your guru, please continue to have strong faith in your guru and Dorje Shugden. For those who have misunderstand or do not know about Dorje Shugden, please think and understand that our concern now is not only about the religious but the importance of fundamental human rights for people.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/huffpost-on-dorje-shugden.html
  • Stella Cheang
    Wednesday, Nov 15. 2017 03:15 PM
    It is uncommon to read unbiased articles about Dorje Shugden issue, more so on international mainstream media. Many international mainstream media shy away from the issue because it is controversial, it involves a 400 years old deity practice that “outsider” finds hard to verify and it deeply intertwines in the entangled Tibetan-China political relationship. Therefore, I rejoice for the job well done by the Huffington Post for carrying this unbiased, well researched and factual article; it is very refreshing and encouraging for all Shugdenpas, for a change.

    Shugden practice is being accused of threatening the unity of all the Buddhism sects in Tibet. The Huffington Post rightly points out that for the past four centuries, Dorje Shugden was propitiated alongside all these main Buddhism schools without any signs of aggressive purge, as claimed by the HHDL people post 1976.

    The only difference between the Shugden practice and the rest of the Tibetan Buddhism practice is almost close to zero. It is really a matter of emphasis. Yet, the ban initiated by HHDL, in all his wisdom, have been fervently actualised by the CTA over the years. Resulting in the ostracisation of the entire Shugden community, and followed by many abuse, beating and threats that ensued on a day-to-day basis. Is it not the exact aggressive purge that threatens the unity of the Buddhism community?

    The deity is being demonised further with no basis. And the community is accused of being Chinese spy. Interestingly, the Chinese angle became an opportune played well by the Beijing after they learnt of this fall out and exploit the discord against their arch rival, HHDL. Will HHDL and his think-tank finally admit that it is better to lift the ban so that the Chinese can stop using it to widen the divide?

    There is another key issue not being pressed on in this article, which I believe it is out of respect to HHDL. This article did not question why HHDL, a 1989 Nobel Peace Prize Laurette, is not hesitant to show no mercy to his own people practicing Dorje Shugden; which is to go against what he championed for the rest of the world.

    Thank you, Rinpoche and the team for this wonderful and uplifting sharing!

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/current-affairs/huffpost-on-dorje-shugden.html
  • Pastor Adeline Woon
    Wednesday, Nov 15. 2017 06:29 AM
    These videos are very necessary to counter the repeated false claims by the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) on the unlawful ban of Dorje Shugden. These videos were highly circulated by the Tibetans on social media platform. Now that the Tibetan version is available, more Tibetans can understand the contradictory statements made by their leader Lobsang Sangyay and the kashag (cabinet). It is very important that the Tibetans understand so that they can unite and join force to vote for a different and more capable leaders who will really do something that benefit them.

    http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-leaderships-new-anti-shugden-video.html

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Known is being comfortable and stagnant,
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Dear friends, The Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Shartse Monastery was authorized and blessed by both Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Zong Rinpoche. He was a favorite among high lamas for his smooth trances and clear prophecies. This video is a one-of-a-kind where you see the Choyang Dulzin Kuten oracle take trance of the peaceful form of Dorje Shugden wearing the robes of a high lama giving teachings, blessings and transmissions. Very sacred and rare video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pawS1TMOe8k
7 days ago
Dear friends, The Dorje Shugden oracle of Gaden Shartse Monastery was authorized and blessed by both Kyabje Trijang Rinpoche and Kyabje Zong Rinpoche. He was a favorite among high lamas for his smooth trances and clear prophecies. This video is a one-of-a-kind where you see the Choyang Dulzin Kuten oracle take trance of the peaceful form of Dorje Shugden wearing the robes of a high lama giving teachings, blessings and transmissions. Very sacred and rare video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pawS1TMOe8k
Beautiful contemporary art piece of Dorje Shugden for free high res download here:  http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html
1 week ago
Beautiful contemporary art piece of Dorje Shugden for free high res download here: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html
The Huffington Post extensively covers the Dorje Shugden issue. I had no idea that this article was being written. I was not contacted, not asked for an interview or asked for any comments, and then it was published and my students alerted me to it. So it was a very, very pleasant and encouraging surprise to read such balanced coverage from such a reputable news website. You can read it here: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=149806
1 week ago
The Huffington Post extensively covers the Dorje Shugden issue. I had no idea that this article was being written. I was not contacted, not asked for an interview or asked for any comments, and then it was published and my students alerted me to it. So it was a very, very pleasant and encouraging surprise to read such balanced coverage from such a reputable news website. You can read it here: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=149806
དེ་རིང་ང་ཁྱེད་རང་ཚོ་མཉམ་དུ་བོད་མིའི་ཆབ་སྲིད་ནང་གི་བློ་མགུ་ནུས་པའི་མངོན་འགྱུར་ཞིག་ཞུའི་ཡིན། གང་དག་བོད་པའི་སྤྱི་ཚོགས་ནང་ཆོས་ལུགས་ཁྱད་པར། དབྱེ་འབྱེད། ཕྱོགས་རིས་ཐོག་ལ་གང་འདྲ་སྟངས་འཛིན་བྱེད་དགོས་ཀྱི་སྐོར་ངེས་གཏན་སྣུན་ཤུགས་བྱེད་ཐུབ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-mp-tenpa-yarphel-speaks-up-against-nechung-tibetan.html
1 week ago
དེ་རིང་ང་ཁྱེད་རང་ཚོ་མཉམ་དུ་བོད་མིའི་ཆབ་སྲིད་ནང་གི་བློ་མགུ་ནུས་པའི་མངོན་འགྱུར་ཞིག་ཞུའི་ཡིན། གང་དག་བོད་པའི་སྤྱི་ཚོགས་ནང་ཆོས་ལུགས་ཁྱད་པར། དབྱེ་འབྱེད། ཕྱོགས་རིས་ཐོག་ལ་གང་འདྲ་སྟངས་འཛིན་བྱེད་དགོས་ཀྱི་སྐོར་ངེས་གཏན་སྣུན་ཤུགས་བྱེད་ཐུབ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-mp-tenpa-yarphel-speaks-up-against-nechung-tibetan.html
བོད་པའི་དབུ་ཁྲིད་ཚོའི་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན་བསྟེན་མཁན་ཚོར་མ་ཉེས་ཁ་ཡོག་གི་བརྙན་ཕྲིན་གསར་པ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-leaderships-new-anti-shugden-video-tibetan.html
1 week ago
བོད་པའི་དབུ་ཁྲིད་ཚོའི་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན་བསྟེན་མཁན་ཚོར་མ་ཉེས་ཁ་ཡོག་གི་བརྙན་ཕྲིན་གསར་པ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-leaderships-new-anti-shugden-video-tibetan.html
(Drepung) Dear friends, In the effort to be creative about something as holy and beneficial as Dorje Shugden, we\'ve come out with these new and realistic depictions. One is Dorje Shugden visiting the Potala Palace and the other is Dorje Shugden arising from Drepung Monastery where he lived in Zimkhang Gangma Ladrang as a high lama. Please enjoy and be blessed. Sincerely, Tsem Rinpoche (High resolution downloads: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html )
2 weeks ago
(Drepung) Dear friends, In the effort to be creative about something as holy and beneficial as Dorje Shugden, we've come out with these new and realistic depictions. One is Dorje Shugden visiting the Potala Palace and the other is Dorje Shugden arising from Drepung Monastery where he lived in Zimkhang Gangma Ladrang as a high lama. Please enjoy and be blessed. Sincerely, Tsem Rinpoche (High resolution downloads: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html )
Dear friends, In the effort to be creative about something as holy and beneficial as Dorje Shugden, we\'ve come out with these new and realistic depictions. One is Dorje Shugden visiting the Potala Palace and the other is Dorje Shugden arising from Drepung Monastery where he lived in Zimkhang Gangma Ladrang as a high lama. Please enjoy and be blessed. Sincerely, Tsem Rinpoche (High resolution downloads: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html )
2 weeks ago
Dear friends, In the effort to be creative about something as holy and beneficial as Dorje Shugden, we've come out with these new and realistic depictions. One is Dorje Shugden visiting the Potala Palace and the other is Dorje Shugden arising from Drepung Monastery where he lived in Zimkhang Gangma Ladrang as a high lama. Please enjoy and be blessed. Sincerely, Tsem Rinpoche (High resolution downloads: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html )
I had this painting commissioned. Please read more here on this great master-
 http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=146195
3 weeks ago
I had this painting commissioned. Please read more here on this great master- http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=146195
How can all the high lamas of Tibet and all the protectors not be able to defeat Dorje Shugden? This is food for thought: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Bj0254UG-Y
3 weeks ago
How can all the high lamas of Tibet and all the protectors not be able to defeat Dorje Shugden? This is food for thought: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Bj0254UG-Y
致全世界的华人:这是我一份小小的心意:一幅富有古中国传统艺术的作品。希望你们会喜欢! http://bit.ly/2zLOjnK
4 weeks ago
致全世界的华人:这是我一份小小的心意:一幅富有古中国传统艺术的作品。希望你们会喜欢! http://bit.ly/2zLOjnK
“One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.”

~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
1 month ago
“One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
Download for free this high res photo of Lord Shugden: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html
1 month ago
Download for free this high res photo of Lord Shugden: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/downloads/buddha-images.html
Whatever we can do to spread the teachings of our Guru, we should do so.
1 month ago
Whatever we can do to spread the teachings of our Guru, we should do so.
 These three (Dharma, Oser and Mumu) are super adorable.
1 month ago
These three (Dharma, Oser and Mumu) are super adorable.
Beautiful Vajra Yogini print.
1 month ago
Beautiful Vajra Yogini print.
Beautiful and holy new statues arrived to Kechara Forest Retreat. Please enjoy the pictures: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=146950
1 month ago
Beautiful and holy new statues arrived to Kechara Forest Retreat. Please enjoy the pictures: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=146950
Beautiful old thangka of Buddha Nageshvaraja
1 month ago
Beautiful old thangka of Buddha Nageshvaraja
Dear friends, This meme is powerful. Who you hang around with and the types of attitude they have is who you will be influenced by many times and who you will become in the future. Look at your friends and the people that always surround you to know who you will become. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
Dear friends, This meme is powerful. Who you hang around with and the types of attitude they have is who you will be influenced by many times and who you will become in the future. Look at your friends and the people that always surround you to know who you will become. Tsem Rinpoche
October 2017, His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal graciously reading our Kechara album and updates as presented by Beng Kooi and Martin. He was very pleased with our progress and offers his blessings. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
October 2017, His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal graciously reading our Kechara album and updates as presented by Beng Kooi and Martin. He was very pleased with our progress and offers his blessings. Tsem Rinpoche
His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche grants audience to Beng Kooi and Martin in France.  Read more on His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche: http://bit.ly/1PlaNNS
1 month ago
His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche grants audience to Beng Kooi and Martin in France. Read more on His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche: http://bit.ly/1PlaNNS
Recently Beng Kooi and Martin on behalf of myself and Kechara was lucky to have audience with His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal of Gaden Shartse Monastery. He lives in around Paris, France. His Holiness is 91 years old and very healthy and alert. He was the 101st throne holder for Tsongkapa and was the head of the Gelugpa school of Buddhism and was very successful during his tenure. He is a strong practitioner of both Sutra and Tantra of Je Tsongkapa\'s tradition and a master of all Buddhist knowledge. He holds steadfast to his protector Dorje Shugden very strongly. So we can see even the highest throneholders who are masters of Sutra and Tantra also practices Dorje Shugden knowing the benefits.

Beng Kooi and Martin brought photo albums of Kechara Forest Retreat/Kechara and updates on Kechara and our works. His Holiness was very pleased to listen and offered some gifts back. 

This is a beautiful picture and the great blessings bestowed on us from His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal.

Humbly, Tsem Rinpoche 
Read more on His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche: http://bit.ly/1PlaNNS
1 month ago
Recently Beng Kooi and Martin on behalf of myself and Kechara was lucky to have audience with His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal of Gaden Shartse Monastery. He lives in around Paris, France. His Holiness is 91 years old and very healthy and alert. He was the 101st throne holder for Tsongkapa and was the head of the Gelugpa school of Buddhism and was very successful during his tenure. He is a strong practitioner of both Sutra and Tantra of Je Tsongkapa's tradition and a master of all Buddhist knowledge. He holds steadfast to his protector Dorje Shugden very strongly. So we can see even the highest throneholders who are masters of Sutra and Tantra also practices Dorje Shugden knowing the benefits. Beng Kooi and Martin brought photo albums of Kechara Forest Retreat/Kechara and updates on Kechara and our works. His Holiness was very pleased to listen and offered some gifts back. This is a beautiful picture and the great blessings bestowed on us from His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche Jetsun Lungrik Namgyal. Humbly, Tsem Rinpoche Read more on His Holiness Gaden Trisur Rinpoche: http://bit.ly/1PlaNNS
The meaning and origins of Halloween: http://bit.ly/2egnVrp
*****and****
My Halloween in Salem: http://bit.ly/2zwq6li

Fantastic Reads!!
1 month ago
The meaning and origins of Halloween: http://bit.ly/2egnVrp *****and**** My Halloween in Salem: http://bit.ly/2zwq6li Fantastic Reads!!
The meaning and origins of Halloween: http://bit.ly/2egnVrp
*****and****
My Halloween in Salem: http://bit.ly/2zwq6li
1 month ago
The meaning and origins of Halloween: http://bit.ly/2egnVrp *****and**** My Halloween in Salem: http://bit.ly/2zwq6li
This is so powerful. It is a must read and must share.
1 month ago
This is so powerful. It is a must read and must share.
Beng Kooi meeting with the scholar and teacher Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen lak. Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen has been very active and you can see his youtubes in Tibetan speaking about the benefits of Dorje Shugden practice. He is a direct student of Trijang Rinpoche and Zong Rinpoche.
1 month ago
Beng Kooi meeting with the scholar and teacher Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen lak. Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen has been very active and you can see his youtubes in Tibetan speaking about the benefits of Dorje Shugden practice. He is a direct student of Trijang Rinpoche and Zong Rinpoche.
Martin meeting with Gen Tashi. Gen Tashi is a very devoted and committed activist of Dorje Shugden\'s cause. He is tireless in speaking for the truth. They enjoyed sharing some time together.
1 month ago
Martin meeting with Gen Tashi. Gen Tashi is a very devoted and committed activist of Dorje Shugden's cause. He is tireless in speaking for the truth. They enjoyed sharing some time together.
Martin meeting with the well known strong and devoted Dorje Shugden activist and scholar Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen lak. Geshe lak was very happy to meet Martin and shared so much wonderful information. Beautiful meeting.
1 month ago
Martin meeting with the well known strong and devoted Dorje Shugden activist and scholar Geshe Konchok Gyeltsen lak. Geshe lak was very happy to meet Martin and shared so much wonderful information. Beautiful meeting.
Beng Kooi meeting with friend and strong and devoted Dorje Shugden activist Gen Tashi
1 month ago
Beng Kooi meeting with friend and strong and devoted Dorje Shugden activist Gen Tashi
Another stunning digital print art of Dorje Shugden from an artist in Peru. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
Another stunning digital print art of Dorje Shugden from an artist in Peru. Tsem Rinpoche
This beautiful Dorje Shugden is from an artist in the Ukraine. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
This beautiful Dorje Shugden is from an artist in the Ukraine. Tsem Rinpoche
Please never get tired of speaking for those who do not have a voice. If we can alleviate their pain or try our best, why not? Thank you all so much. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
Please never get tired of speaking for those who do not have a voice. If we can alleviate their pain or try our best, why not? Thank you all so much. Tsem Rinpoche
Pastor Antoinette of Kechara arranged a Malaysian artist to paint this special Dorje Shugden painting conceptualized by myself. She oversaw the process and completed it. Wonderful beautiful Dorje Shugden Malaysian style by Malaysian artist. Tsem Rinpoche
1 month ago
Pastor Antoinette of Kechara arranged a Malaysian artist to paint this special Dorje Shugden painting conceptualized by myself. She oversaw the process and completed it. Wonderful beautiful Dorje Shugden Malaysian style by Malaysian artist. Tsem Rinpoche
Sometimes after my prayers, reading on sasquatch is relaxing. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
Sometimes after my prayers, reading on sasquatch is relaxing. Tsem Rinpoche
This gorgeous outdoor bronze Buddha is in Korea. Would be lovely to pay homage to Him there.
2 months ago
This gorgeous outdoor bronze Buddha is in Korea. Would be lovely to pay homage to Him there.
Beautiful old vintage photo of Kamakura Buddha in Japan. I had the good fortune to visit this holy Buddha a few years back. I do hope I can go again with some students. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
Beautiful old vintage photo of Kamakura Buddha in Japan. I had the good fortune to visit this holy Buddha a few years back. I do hope I can go again with some students. Tsem Rinpoche
Tsem Rinpoche with Kyabje Gangchen Rinpoche in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during the Medicine Buddha festival.
2 months ago
Tsem Rinpoche with Kyabje Gangchen Rinpoche in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during the Medicine Buddha festival.
This is a unique thangka of Pelden Hlamo with Dorje Shugden and Setrap and Nechung. Of course they all get along unlike what Tibetan leadership likes to say they don\'t get along. All enlightened beings get along with other enlightened beings and unenlightened beings. Enlightened beings have no karma to not get along with others. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
This is a unique thangka of Pelden Hlamo with Dorje Shugden and Setrap and Nechung. Of course they all get along unlike what Tibetan leadership likes to say they don't get along. All enlightened beings get along with other enlightened beings and unenlightened beings. Enlightened beings have no karma to not get along with others. Tsem Rinpoche
I love this picture. I wish it will all settle down soon.
2 months ago
I love this picture. I wish it will all settle down soon.
 I love this picture of Mumu peeking through the screen and window to see what is going on. He is always been very busy body and active. He has to know what is going on. I love you Mumu.
2 months ago
I love this picture of Mumu peeking through the screen and window to see what is going on. He is always been very busy body and active. He has to know what is going on. I love you Mumu.
How would you like to get one piece of this beautiful piece of art?
2 months ago
How would you like to get one piece of this beautiful piece of art?
First time PM Tenpa Yarphel speaks up against Nechung. It has created a huge stir. Must read: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=144220
2 months ago
First time PM Tenpa Yarphel speaks up against Nechung. It has created a huge stir. Must read: http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/?p=144220
I always like my rooms to smell clean, fresh, woodsy and a bit like the forest. my favorite types of essential oils to burn daily or as an offering to the Buddhas are Juniper, Cypress, Black Spruce, Peppermint and sometimes Rosemary. I like the smell of the forest, woods and wooded areas very much. I\'ve been using essential oils in my rooms for years. I don\'t necessarily purchase the brand you see in the picture as I buy any brand as long as it\'s made naturally. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
I always like my rooms to smell clean, fresh, woodsy and a bit like the forest. my favorite types of essential oils to burn daily or as an offering to the Buddhas are Juniper, Cypress, Black Spruce, Peppermint and sometimes Rosemary. I like the smell of the forest, woods and wooded areas very much. I've been using essential oils in my rooms for years. I don't necessarily purchase the brand you see in the picture as I buy any brand as long as it's made naturally. Tsem Rinpoche
In the bitter coldness of Yachen Gar, Tibet, several nuns are practicing meditation. You can see many small single \'huts\' in the background. They do this yearly and throughout the year. It is very inspiring to see people practice even under extreme conditions because they realize how samsara is so full of deceptions. Praise to the Dharma that liberates us with truth and practice. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
In the bitter coldness of Yachen Gar, Tibet, several nuns are practicing meditation. You can see many small single 'huts' in the background. They do this yearly and throughout the year. It is very inspiring to see people practice even under extreme conditions because they realize how samsara is so full of deceptions. Praise to the Dharma that liberates us with truth and practice. Tsem Rinpoche
More than you have....
2 months ago
More than you have....
The holiest place for the spiritual seeker is where our guru abides. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
The holiest place for the spiritual seeker is where our guru abides. Tsem Rinpoche
Beautiful flowers offered on my shrine to Sacred Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
Beautiful flowers offered on my shrine to Sacred Vajra Yogini. Tsem Rinpoche
This is my favorite image of Lord Manjusri. I had this exact same image as a kid in the 1980\'s and treasured it very much. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
This is my favorite image of Lord Manjusri. I had this exact same image as a kid in the 1980's and treasured it very much. Tsem Rinpoche
I love this idyllic painting of a beautiful Buddhist temple in a small town with foliage, natural, blue skies and country living. I can definitely live in this type of environment any time. I love living near nature. I wish I can go inside this picture to start living there now. Tsem Rinpoche
2 months ago
I love this idyllic painting of a beautiful Buddhist temple in a small town with foliage, natural, blue skies and country living. I can definitely live in this type of environment any time. I love living near nature. I wish I can go inside this picture to start living there now. Tsem Rinpoche
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    2 months ago
    Important video to watch and learn.
  • Bigfoot’s voice captured on tape.
    2 months ago
    Bigfoot’s voice captured on tape.
  • Amazing video that you will not regret watching.
    2 months ago
    Amazing video that you will not regret watching.
  • Norma Jean
    3 months ago
    Norma Jean
    These are the heartbreaking scenes we see over and over again, that we share in the hopes of telling the stories of those who otherwise would have suffered and vanished from this earth without a trace. This is Norma Jean. Free for a little over five months, she knew more happiness than millions of her sisters ever will. But she couldn’t escape the fate genetically programmed into her as an egg producing machine. She seemed more lethargic than usual this morning, so we brought her inside to administer fluids and antibiotics in the hopes of pulling her through until we could get her in to see our vet. She couldn’t hang on. She died this evening shortly after this video was taken, severely infected from the rotting egg yolk adhered to various organs throughout her abdominal cavity. Like virtually every single one of her sisters, caged or free range, rescued or not, she paid the ultimate price for eggs (from FB)
  • If you want to change the world, start of by making your bed
    3 months ago
    If you want to change the world, start of by making your bed
    If you want to change the world, measure a person by the size of their heart
  • Canadian PM Justin Trudeau visits a Hindu mandir (temple)
    3 months ago
    Canadian PM Justin Trudeau visits a Hindu mandir (temple)
    While on a visit to a Hindu mandir (temple), Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks on diversity as Canada's strength.

ASK A PASTOR


Ask the Pastors

A section for you to clarify your Dharma questions with Kechara’s esteemed pastors.

Just post your name and your question below and one of our pastors will provide you with an answer.

Scroll down and click on "View All Questions" to view archived questions.

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CHAT PICTURES

Your wedding venue @ Kechara Oasis Viva Home #vegetarian #restaurant ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Your wedding venue @ Kechara Oasis Viva Home #vegetarian #restaurant ~ Guat Hee
Before the wedding lunch, the #children are Q up for Ang Pow #happy #幸福 ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Before the wedding lunch, the #children are Q up for Ang Pow #happy #幸福 ~ Guat Hee
Reception and photo booth #register #table ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Reception and photo booth #register #table ~ Guat Hee
Tea ceremony @ kechara oasis #vegetarian #lunch #lovely #couple ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Tea ceremony @ kechara oasis #vegetarian #lunch #lovely #couple ~ Guat Hee
Door gift #wedding #banquet #喜糖 ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Door gift #wedding #banquet #喜糖 ~ Guat Hee
While waiting for the next section #study #homework #school #bless #partime ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
While waiting for the next section #study #homework #school #bless #partime ~ Guat Hee
Weekend at Kechara Oasis #partime #homework #student #vegetarian ~ Guat Hee
yesterday
Weekend at Kechara Oasis #partime #homework #student #vegetarian ~ Guat Hee
KSDS parents & students worked together for the discussion during the Talk on Acceptance, Kindness and Helping Each Other. Alice Tay, KSDS
3 days ago
KSDS parents & students worked together for the discussion during the Talk on Acceptance, Kindness and Helping Each Other. Alice Tay, KSDS
Ms. Mok Pui Leng has offered lights and incense to Lama Tsongkhapa and all the Buddhas on behalf of KISG today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
3 days ago
Ms. Mok Pui Leng has offered lights and incense to Lama Tsongkhapa and all the Buddhas on behalf of KISG today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
Kechara Ipoh Study Group has carried out a session of Mother Tara's prayer recitations in Ipoh today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
3 days ago
Kechara Ipoh Study Group has carried out a session of Mother Tara's prayer recitations in Ipoh today. So Kin Hoe (KISG)
KSDS Students are very cooperative & creative in making the artwork for coming event, Graduation / Halloween / Art Event. Alice Tay, KSDS
3 days ago
KSDS Students are very cooperative & creative in making the artwork for coming event, Graduation / Halloween / Art Event. Alice Tay, KSDS
KSDS students age 7 and the above learned to do&paint their own mask. Alice Tay, KSDS
3 days ago
KSDS students age 7 and the above learned to do&paint their own mask. Alice Tay, KSDS
The youngest group of KSDS learned to recite Migtsema mantra. Alice Tay, KSDS
3 days ago
The youngest group of KSDS learned to recite Migtsema mantra. Alice Tay, KSDS
KSDS teachers in the progress for the Graduation/Halloween 2017 backdrop. Alice Tay, KSDS
3 days ago
KSDS teachers in the progress for the Graduation/Halloween 2017 backdrop. Alice Tay, KSDS
Teacher Peggy gave a talk on Bully to parents and students. Lin Mun KSDS
4 days ago
Teacher Peggy gave a talk on Bully to parents and students. Lin Mun KSDS
Great to hv parents and students goodnight group work and share ideas from different perspectives. Lin Mun KSDS
4 days ago
Great to hv parents and students goodnight group work and share ideas from different perspectives. Lin Mun KSDS
Photographer team for Mid Autumn Charity Dinner 2017. Lin Mun KSDS
4 days ago
Photographer team for Mid Autumn Charity Dinner 2017. Lin Mun KSDS
KSDS team had meeting in Kechara Oasis in preparation for the Graduation/ Halloween event. Lin Mun KSDS
4 days ago
KSDS team had meeting in Kechara Oasis in preparation for the Graduation/ Halloween event. Lin Mun KSDS
Artwork done by children of 2-6 yrs old for the upcoming Graduation/ Halloween/ Art event. Lin Mun Ksds
4 days ago
Artwork done by children of 2-6 yrs old for the upcoming Graduation/ Halloween/ Art event. Lin Mun Ksds
At Dukkar Apartment, Kechara Forest Retreat, this morning, we completed a three day Amitayus Retreat and promised to come together for this spiritually powerful retreat again in the near future. We had looked forward to this retreat and, owing to the blessings of our Guru, Tsem Rinpoche, and Dorje Shugden, it went smoothly and as planned. by Pastor Han Nee
6 days ago
At Dukkar Apartment, Kechara Forest Retreat, this morning, we completed a three day Amitayus Retreat and promised to come together for this spiritually powerful retreat again in the near future. We had looked forward to this retreat and, owing to the blessings of our Guru, Tsem Rinpoche, and Dorje Shugden, it went smoothly and as planned. by Pastor Han Nee
དེ་རིང་ང་ཁྱེད་རང་ཚོ་མཉམ་དུ་བོད་མིའི་ཆབ་སྲིད་ནང་གི་བློ་མགུ་ནུས་པའི་མངོན་འགྱུར་ཞིག་ཞུའི་ཡིན། གང་དག་བོད་པའི་སྤྱི་ཚོགས་ནང་ཆོས་ལུགས་ཁྱད་པར། དབྱེ་འབྱེད། ཕྱོགས་རིས་ཐོག་ལ་གང་འདྲ་སྟངས་འཛིན་བྱེད་དགོས་ཀྱི་སྐོར་ངེས་གཏན་སྣུན་ཤུགས་བྱེད་ཐུབ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-mp-tenpa-yarphel-speaks-up-against-nechung-tibetan.html
1 week ago
དེ་རིང་ང་ཁྱེད་རང་ཚོ་མཉམ་དུ་བོད་མིའི་ཆབ་སྲིད་ནང་གི་བློ་མགུ་ནུས་པའི་མངོན་འགྱུར་ཞིག་ཞུའི་ཡིན། གང་དག་བོད་པའི་སྤྱི་ཚོགས་ནང་ཆོས་ལུགས་ཁྱད་པར། དབྱེ་འབྱེད། ཕྱོགས་རིས་ཐོག་ལ་གང་འདྲ་སྟངས་འཛིན་བྱེད་དགོས་ཀྱི་སྐོར་ངེས་གཏན་སྣུན་ཤུགས་བྱེད་ཐུབ། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-mp-tenpa-yarphel-speaks-up-against-nechung-tibetan.html
ལོ་སྔོན་མར་བོད་གཞུང་གིས་ཆོས་སྐྱོང་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན་དང་འདིའི་བསྟེན་གསོལ་བ་རྣམས་ལ་སྐྱོན་བརྗོད་བྱེད་ཏེ་དེའི་ཁ་གཏད་དུ་ཡིག་ཆ་འགྲེམས་ཡོད་པས། དེའི་ལན་ལ་ཀེ་ཆ་ར་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ནས་བརྙེན་འཕྲིན་ཁྱོན་བསྡོམས་ལྔ་འགྲེམས་ཡོད། བརྙེན་འཕྲིན་དེ་དག་ནང་རིག་པ་དང་མཐུན་པའི་རྩོད་གླེང་ནང་ཡོད་པ་དང་དོན་དངོས་གང་ཡིན་སྐོར་གསལ་བཤད་གནང་ཏེ་བདེན་པ་རྭ་སྤྲོད་བྱེད་ཡོད། དེར་རྣམ་པ་ཚོ་ཚང་མའི་གཟིགས་རོ་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་དང་། གལ་ཏེ་ཡ་ལེན་ཡོད་ན་གནང་རོ་གནང་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་ཡིན། ཐུགས་རྗེ་ཆེ།། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-leaderships-new-anti-shugden-video-tibetan.html
1 week ago
ལོ་སྔོན་མར་བོད་གཞུང་གིས་ཆོས་སྐྱོང་རྡོ་རྗེ་ཤུགས་ལྡན་དང་འདིའི་བསྟེན་གསོལ་བ་རྣམས་ལ་སྐྱོན་བརྗོད་བྱེད་ཏེ་དེའི་ཁ་གཏད་དུ་ཡིག་ཆ་འགྲེམས་ཡོད་པས། དེའི་ལན་ལ་ཀེ་ཆ་ར་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ནས་བརྙེན་འཕྲིན་ཁྱོན་བསྡོམས་ལྔ་འགྲེམས་ཡོད། བརྙེན་འཕྲིན་དེ་དག་ནང་རིག་པ་དང་མཐུན་པའི་རྩོད་གླེང་ནང་ཡོད་པ་དང་དོན་དངོས་གང་ཡིན་སྐོར་གསལ་བཤད་གནང་ཏེ་བདེན་པ་རྭ་སྤྲོད་བྱེད་ཡོད། དེར་རྣམ་པ་ཚོ་ཚང་མའི་གཟིགས་རོ་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་དང་། གལ་ཏེ་ཡ་ལེན་ཡོད་ན་གནང་རོ་གནང་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་ཡིན། ཐུགས་རྗེ་ཆེ།། http://www.tsemrinpoche.com/tsem-tulku-rinpoche/dorje-shugden/tibetan-leaderships-new-anti-shugden-video-tibetan.html
Kechara Sunday Dharma School art activities. StellaC
1 week ago
Kechara Sunday Dharma School art activities. StellaC
Kechara Sunday Dharma School art activities. StellaC
1 week ago
Kechara Sunday Dharma School art activities. StellaC
Kechara Sunday Dharma school class 4 to 6 years old. StellaC
1 week ago
Kechara Sunday Dharma school class 4 to 6 years old. StellaC
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Dorje Shugden
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